Question about Bushnell NorthStar 78-8846 (675 x 114mm) Telescope

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Image Obstruction No matter what I do there is always this roung object with a line coming off the top right of it obstruction my view of EVERY star and planet that I have viewed does anyone know what is going on?

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I have got this scope and i can also see the vanes from the spider all the time. How can looking at stars be enjoyed if i cannot see them without this obstruction?

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

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????? I am having the same problem the eyepiece I am using is 22 mm focal lengh?????

Posted on Sep 16, 2009

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That is the reflection of the secondary mirror and holder - are you using an eyepiece? If so, is it between 10 and 30 mm focal length? More than thirty you may start to see a dark spot in the center, less than 10 and everything will probably be pretty blurry.

Posted on Jul 22, 2009

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Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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1 Answer

I cannot see anything and what is the finder scope on top for?


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

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1 Answer

Image is upside down (inverted)


All astronomical telescopes show upside down images this is normal.

You can buy an "erecting prism" to use for terrestrial viewing from many on-line retailers here is one: This will flip the image so it is not upside down.

http://www.amazon.com/Bushnell-780103-1-25%C3%93-Format-Erecting/dp/B000EY2ZFK

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Like others, I have trouble seeing stars. There is an obstruction, an image of the secondary mirror which obscures most of the star. Is this the spider? Others have asked the same question, but I haven't...


Yes, you are not focusing the telescope properly. When in focus you cannot see the spider.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. Go outside during the day and practice focusing on a distant object.

Oct 18, 2009 | Bushnell NorthStar® 78-8846 (675 x 114mm)...

2 Answers

Ditto


You bought what we call a toy "department store telescope". Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the scope. DO NOT use any 2x barlow which might have been included.

Go outside during the daytime and practice focusing on a distant object. AND---- no you will not get 450 magnification from that telescope, even though it was written in bold letters on the box.

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You can slow down dew forming on the mirror by NOT pointing the telescope toward the sky during cool-down-- just leave it parallel to the ground. Same goes for your eyepieces -- leave them covered, or inside a case.

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