Question about Soundstream Di475.1 Sub Amp 950 W Max Class D Amplifier

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Ampliflier came in for repairs..Both the output & power transistor are missing.can you help with the part number for both transistors?

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I am attempting to repair a Kustom K100A-1 guitar amp. I found one shorted output transistor, an RCA 36892, which crosses with a NTE 130. Do I need to replace all 5 outputs with matched transistors, or can...


I don't have a schematic for this unit, however good design would not demand matched transistors.
If a transistor has shorted, USUALLY mating transistors have been damaged. I am not sure how "5" outputs are configured as usually there is symetry and an even number. If the "5" are all on one side and there are mating trnsistors of another number, then likely there is damage to more components and probably back one stage in the drivers or even farther.
Hint: when re-powering this after repair, put a 100 Watt light bulb in series with the power into the unit to act as a limiting fuse that resets without driving heavy current into the unit causing more damage due to failed parts that were not eliminated in the first reapir.

Jan 06, 2011 | Music

1 Answer

H out transistor defetive & number missing plz solve


Hello

The horizontal output transistor number for Sony KV-ES34M61

Horizontal output - [Q6807] == 2SC5480-01
Pin output - [Q6808] == 2SC5480-01 Again

Please replace bothe the transistor at the same time. Check horizontal output transformer [LOT of HOT], for any defects.. Ok

Jan 06, 2011 | Sony KV-ES34M61 34" TV

2 Answers

Wont work


I have the same amp I just bought off e-bay not working. It's what I do. I buy amps that don't work then repair them and resale. Anyway mine did the same thing and your problem is shorted output transistors. Find which ones and replace. But, since this is a 1 channel amp you will want to replace all the output transistors. Make sure the replacements are from same manufactuer, same date code/ batch number. It's better to have transistors that are from the same batch cause mixed transistors can have little variations that might cause problems later on. Good luck and let me know. I will help you if you need more help.

Feb 04, 2009 | Bazooka EL1500 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Sony xplod 1200 watt amp quit no kind of protect lite on please


short answer yes... Long answer... Amp Failure: There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors: In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals. Note: I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit. It is most likely the power supply that has taken a ****.

Jan 01, 2009 | Sony Xplod XM-1652Z Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

401s Rockford Fosgate Amp. Not turning on. No power light. Pos+ and GR- are solid. Thought it may be remote, so tried running a wire from the POS+ to REM to test it, no luck


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals. Note:
I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit.

These repairs are best left to a repair tech familiar with car audio amplifiers. Check with your local shop to get a reccomendation. If the light isnt even coming on, chances are your input or power supply has been taken out.

Jan 01, 2009 | Rockford Fosgate Punch 401S Car Audio...

1 Answer

No sound coming from speakers Blaupunkt GTA470 Amp


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.

Dec 31, 2008 | Blaupunkt PCA460 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

I have an audiobahn A8000t amp with the protection light on


There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure.
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.
Note:
I used the terms short and open on the previous paragraph. A short (short circuit) is a path through which current flows that should not be there. An open (open circuit) is a break in the circuit.

Dec 30, 2008 | AudioBahn A8000T Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Amp turns on just fine but no sound comes out


Amp Failure:
There are many different ways that an amp can fail but the two most common failures are shorted output transistors and blown power supply transistors (< those are not blown). There are several types of protection circuits in amplifiers. The most common are over-current and thermal. The over-current protection is supposed to protect the output transistors. Sometimes it doesn't work well enough to prevent the failure of the output transistors but it will work well enough to shut the supply down before the power supply FETs are destroyed. If the amp remains in protect mode, goes into protect mode or blows the fuse as soon as the remote voltage is applied, shorted output transistors are almost certainly the cause. If the fuse protecting the amp is too large, if the protection circuit doesn't respond quickly enough or if the power supply is poorly designed, the power supply transistors may fail. If you see a lot of black soot on the power supply transistors (near the power transformer), the power supply transistors have failed. Soot on the board doesn't necessarily mean the transistors have failed. Sometimes, technicians don't clean up the mess from a previous failure. Transistor Failure/Checking Transistors:
In general, when a transistor fails, it will either short (common for output AND power supply transistors) or open (common for power supply transistors). Transistors act like valves. They control the current flowing through a circuit. A shorted transistor acts like a valve that's stuck open (passing too much current). In the case of an output transistor, the shorted transistors tries to deliver the full rail voltage to the speaker output terminal. If you've ever seen a damaged amp that pushed or pulled the speaker cone to its limits when the amp powered up (common on some Rockford amplifiers), that was almost certainly due to a shorted output transistor. When checking transistors, you most commonly look for shorted connections inside the transistor. You do this by using a multimeter to look for low resistance connections between the transistor's terminals.

Seems as you have blown an output. Seek repairs.

Dec 29, 2008 | Power Acoustik A3000DB Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

Denon AVC-A1SE in protection mode


The numbers of the transistors thay you need to replaced are on the transistor themselfs. Just take out the bad transistors and get the numbers that you need. I ALWAYS replace the output, driver and bias control transistor myself. One thing to keep in mind, if the number on the transistor starts with "A or B or C or D or K" you need to add "2S" in front of that number when you order it. Now that this problem has repeated itself, double check your wire and speaker. They can cause this problem.

Nov 09, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Power On + red LED turns on + but final relay (click) don't come so no sound


Your audio output transistors are shorted and your unit is staying in "protect " mode to protect your speakers from 40 to 60 volts that is being sent at them from the shorted outputs. If you can use a meter you won't need the schematic MOST likely because the outputs are USUALLY the only parts that short out. The output transistors( or chip ) are mounted to the large, finned heatsink. The #'s on the transistors start with "2SA-" and "2SC-" followed by numbers. There are two output transistors per channel. If your unit uses an IC for audio output then the # on the IC will be "STK-" followed by numbers. These parts are available from tritronicsinc.com. Good Luck!

barneyluc

Oct 17, 2008 | Denon PMA-2000R 2-Channel Amplifier

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