Question about EliteGroup ECS 945GCT-M/1333 Motherboard - v3.0, Intel 945GC, Socket 775, MicroATX, Audio, Video, PCI Express

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No power - EliteGroup ECS 945GCT-M/1333 Motherboard - v3.0, Intel 945GC, Socket 775, MicroATX, Audio, Video, PCI Express

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If you aren't getting power to the mother board, unhook everything from the powersupply, and put a paperclip in the green wire, and the black wire to the left of it. That will tell you if your power supply is working. If it works great its your motherboard, if not, its your powersupply.

Please rate my awnser. Thank you.

Posted on Jan 22, 2009

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My computer not powering up and the power supply is good because I tested it another computer. Can you please help me.


  1. Verify that the power supply voltage switch is set correctly. If the input voltage for the power supply does not match the correct setting for your country, your computer may not power on at all.
  2. Check for disconnected computer power cable connections. A loose or unplugged power cable is one of the top reasons why a computer doesn't turn on.
  3. Replace the computer's power cable. This is the power cable that runs between the computer case and the power source.
    A bad power cable isn't a common cause of a computer not receiving power but it does happen and is very easy to test for. You can use the one that's powering your monitor (as long as it seems to be getting power), one from another computer, or a new one.
  4. Perform a "lamp test" to verify power is being provided from the wall. Your computer isn't going to turn on if it's not getting power so you need to make sure that the power source is working properly ,.

Sep 13, 2013 | Biostar MCP6P M2+ 6.x Motherboard

1 Answer

New GA-990AX-UD3 motherboard will not boot


You really should take that Power Supply, and use it on grandma's computer.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to provide more power To the motherboard AND processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable has TWO yellow wires.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR 12 Volt wires.

In the motherboard manual, does it say, "Yes Tom. Go ahead and use a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. We don't care. We just use an 8-pin EPS for fun."

[ This is an 8-pin PCI Express power cable. Completely different,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8 ]

The motherboard probably uses 150 Watts by itself.
No Ram Memory, no CPU, no fans, etc.

The CPU could use up to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what AMD, socket AM3, processor you are using.

Now to graphics card's power;
The most Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The most power a 6-pin PCI Express power cable can deliver is 75 Watts.
8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable? 150 Watts.

When buying a Power Supply you should calculate all components needing power,

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

,then buy a Power Supply that has AT LEAST 10 percent more power than needed. Easier on the Power Supply.
Also a computer will NOT use more power than it needs.

10,000 Watt power supply, (Exaggeration ), and the computer only needs about 100 Watts for surfing the internet?

Computer ONLY uses 100 Watts.

Due to the price, the above, and the availability, you should use a 500 Watt power supply at least.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899123&CatId=1079

http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6in-Pin-Power-Adapter/dp/B002O21XHQ

Or use it on yours if it has enough Wattage.

Back in the day, the motherboard didn't need to supply that much power to components on it.
More powerful Processors, Ram Memory, and graphics cards, brought the power needed, up.

A 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was added for the motherboard. Then 6-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Then the 8-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Lastly the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

(Better make sure the Power Supply you have is good, if you wish to use the above power adapter cable. Nothing like having a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, and a new build, to pull your hair out on )

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3894#ov


Out of the motherboard manual Page 23,

"With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design.

Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation. The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system."

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 25, 2012 | Gigabyte Technology GA-990FXA-UD3-...

1 Answer

Gateway dx4822-01 power supply


Gateway DX4822 Desktop PC,

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/product/default.aspx?tab=1&modelId=2291

Just a regular Ol' ATX power supply. Rated at a maximum wattage rating of 300 to 525 Watts. Two different power supply options offered.

Power Supply case size is;
6 Inches Wide, by 5-1/2 Inches Long, by 3-1/4 Inches Tall. (152.4mm Wide, by 139.7mm Long, by 82.55mm Tall )

Has the following power cables;

A) 1 -> 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

[ NOTE* Color of connector on power cable, OR motherboard, does NOT matter.

Proper connector, proper power cable, DOES matter; connector color does not matter ]

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

{ Power to the motherboard, and all components connected to it }

C) 2 or more -> SATA power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

{ Power to a SATA harddrive, and/or power to SATA optical drive/s.
(CD/DVD drive) Or power for an upgrade in the future, for a SATA optical drive }

D) 3 or more -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

{ Power for an IDE (PATA) harddrive, or drives. Also power for IDE (PATA) optical drive/s. Plus power in some instances, for computer case fans }

E) Two or more Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

{ Listed as a Floppy Drive power cable. Back in the day when the article was written, such was true.
It can still be used for a Floppy Drive, but is more used now as a power cable for a;
1) Card Reader.
2) Computer case fans (IF needed }

It's name is Small 4-pin Peripheral power cable. It is smaller than it's larger cousin, the Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

Also has smaller gauge of wiring. This means it cannot carry the same amperage, as the standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

I would recommend this,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899124&CatId=1483

A) 1 -> 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.
Can be used as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable, which is what you need.

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

C) 6 -> SATA power cables

D) 4 -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables

E) 1 -> Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables

F) 1 -> 6-pin PCI Express power cable

G) 1 -> 6/8-pin PCI Express power cable.

In the future, (Or now if you have one), you can upgrade to a better graphics card, that needs an additional power cable, IF you wish.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable.

You also have a 6-pin or 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
(6/8-pin PCI Express power cable)

All the pins can be used together, and make an 8-pin PCI Express power cable, for a very powerful graphics card that requires this cable.

Just added bonuses with today's modern power supply's.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jul 04, 2012 | Gateway DX4822-01 Power Supply 575 Watt...

1 Answer

Atx motherboard wiring diagram


For the power cables from the Power Supply? Or Power Supply, and Front Panel header on the motherboard?

For both of these you need to state the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number.
Post back in a Comment.


If you just wish a generic, one-size-fits-all explanation;

A) 20 or 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The older computers use a 20-pin ATX main power cable. As computers needed more power to the motherboard, the 24-pin ATX main power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Scroll the page down for info on the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

[ Much older motherboards (AT) used two main power cables. { In the link - Original PC main power cables} ]


B) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
Was brought out because Processors needed more power, than the 24-pin ATX main power cable feeding the motherboard, could deliver.

Power for the Processor,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4


C) 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable
Commonly misnomered as 'Molex'.

Molex was a model name given by the first manufacturer, of this design of power cable connector.
The name stuck. Kind of like referring to an adjustable open-end wrench as a Crescent wrench.

It is also referred to as a 4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable, because there are two styles of 4-pin Peripheral power cables.

4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Generally used for IDE (PATA) harddrives, and IDE optical drives.


4-pin Small Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

Older computers used it for power to the Floppy Drive. It's generally used now to provide power for a Card Reader.

Note that both types of connectors use the same power wires, and 2 ground wires.
Yellow is 12 Volts
Red is 5 Volts
Black is Ground

[ Also, in the ATX main power cable:
Orange is 3.3 Volts, the Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. Abbreviated as PS_ON.

Power Supply plugged into power, the Soft Power On wire is briefly touched to ANY Ground wire. This is bypassing the Power On switch.
If the computer (Power Supply) comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.
IF the computer (Power Supply) does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply ]

(ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They all lead back to one central Ground point.
ALL power wires lead back to one point in the power supply, for EACH power wire.

The 12 Volt power wires, (Yellow), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 12 Volt power rail.

The 5 Volt power wires, (Red), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 5 Volt power rail.

The 3.3 Volt power wires, (Orange), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 3.3 Volt power rail ]

D) SATA power cable
15-pin power cable for SATA harddrives, and SATA optical drives,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

[ The smaller 7-pin SATA connector is the interface cable, or data cable.

IF, you have a SATA harddrive that has a provision for a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable.

It will burn out the harddrive if you use both. It may not do it right away, but eventually it will.
I have had people state over the years, that they were using both power cables. Came back two months later to tell me their harddrives had burned out ]

More to follow in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 30, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

RE ASUS P5S800-VM Motherboard.. system will not power up.. processor heatsink fan does not power up ... but ... removing processor and pressing power switch fan does work.. what is the problem??


Bad Power Supply. Weak voltage power rail.

[There are three main power rails in the SMPS for your desktop computer.
A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail ]

1) ALL of the LED lights on at once use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it.

Remove the Processor, and you will have power to light LED lights, and spin fans.
Of course without a Processor operating, you have No computer.

Replace the Power Supply.

Do you have a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply available to use for a test unit?

Need guidance in replacing, or suggestions for Power Supply's to choose from, post In a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Dec 02, 2010 | ASUS P5S800-VM Motherboard

1 Answer

Is that any specified smps to be used for mother board


Depends on the age of the motherboard.

To clarify;

When Switched-Mode Power Supply's were first made for personal computers, for the main power cable they used two of them.
This was the AT power supply.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

The next version of the SMPS used a single main power cable, the ATX power supply.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

As personal computers increased in Processor power, and graphics power, it was found that more power to the motherboard was needed. The ATX main power cable was increased from 20-pin to 24-pin, to handle the extra load,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

A lot of motherboards also receive extra power through a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This power cable is used for power to the Processor.

Power Supply's (SMPS) have increased in power over the years to keep up with the demand for power.
They have also increased the number, and type of power cables used.

Some now have an extra 6-pin PCI Express power cable for added power to a graphics card, or two 6-pin PCI Express power cables.

Some SMPS's have an 8-pin PCI Express power cable for added power to a graphics card.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

If an SMPS has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, it is used for added power to the motherboard, for the Processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

If your concern is how much power can your motherboard handle, know this;

A computer ONLY uses the power it needs, and NO more.

If you had a 10,000 Watt power supply, and the computer only needs 100 Watts, the computer only uses 100 Watts. (10,000 Watts is an exaggeration)

Do you know the motherboard's name, and Model Number?
State in a Comment, and I should be able to tell you what power cables it needs, and give examples of an SMPS that will work.

SMPS,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Nov 06, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Acer 5630z power shutdown after 30 to 60 miniutes no power ON only battery LED will go to off for 6 to 8 seconds but no power ON


If the computer is not receiving any power this mean the power supply or your power cable may be faulty,you should try another power cable/ power supply, but if you can see the light indicating the computer is receiving power, this mean the power button may have a fault and need to be changed,if the problem still not solve you should replace the motherboard. Make sure you check the power cable and power supply first.

May 18, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

No power how can i resolve it


If none of the front panel lights turn on when you press the power button, then check the power lead is connected properly to the switch mode power supply and to the mains outlet.
Also try a different power cord.
If it still does not power up then the switch mode power supply is probably faulty.
Install a different switch mode power supply in the desktop computer to see if it powers up (make sure the capacity of this power supply is equal or greater than the original power supply).
If you cannot get another switch mode power supply to test in your desktop computer, then take the switch mode power supply to your friendly computer shop and have them test it for you. Replace the switch mode power supply if it is faulty..

Nov 07, 2009 | ASUS motherboard P5S-MX SE LGA775 SiS671FX...

1 Answer

Compaq Presario 4400us


Either the new power supply you purchased is not functioning correctly. But, assuming it is now that you are getting some form of power to your PC, it is very likely the motherboard. Whatever fried your old power supply (or it could have just been the power supply itself) most likely fried your motherboard in the process. Probably not the CPU since the MB can't even post.

Jun 21, 2007 | Compaq (388746-001)...

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