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Web server I want some sites to give information about web server? Please specify some computer sites.

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How can i fix http error 504,when im downloading microsoft office


Introduction

A server (not necessarily a Web server) is acting as a gateway or proxy to fulfil the request by the client (e.g. your Web browser or our CheckUpDown robot) to access the requested URL. This server did not receive a timely response from an upstream server it accessed to deal with your HTTP request.

This usually means that the upstream server is down (no response to the gateway/proxy), rather than that the upstream server and the gateway/proxy do not agree on the protocol for exchanging data.

504 errors in the HTTP cycle

Any client (e.g. your Web browser or our CheckUpDown robot) goes through the following cycle when it communicates with the Web server:
Obtain an IP address from the IP name of the site (the site URL without the leading 'http://'). This lookup (conversion of IP name to IP address) is provided by domain name servers (DNSs).
Open an IP socket connection to that IP address.
Write an HTTP data stream through that socket.
Receive an HTTP data stream back from the Web server in response. This data stream contains status codes whose values are determined by the HTTP protocol. Parse this data stream for status codes and other useful information.

This error occurs in the final step above when the client receives an HTTP status code that it recognises as '504'. Frank Vipond. September 2010.

Fixing 504 errors - general

This problem is entirely due to slow IP communication between back-end computers, possibly including the Web server. Only the people who set up the network at the site which hosts the Web server can fix this problem.

Fixing 504 errors - CheckUpDown

Use of proxies and caching is increasing on the Web. Our CheckUpDown robot will always try to 'drill through' to the real computer that actually hosts the Web site, but we do not have complete control over where our HTTP request actually ends up. If only one link in the chain of computers dealing with our HTTP request is broken, then an error such as 504 can easily occur.

Please contact us (email preferred) whenever you encounter 504 errors - there is nothing you can do to sort them out. We then have to liaise with your ISP and the vendor of the Web server software so that they can review the flow of IP data traffic between various computers under their control. However this is not an easy error to sort out, because the ebb and flow of Internet traffic makes this type of error very transient., with little chance of any real fix, as really there isn't much the end user can do?

Short answer, get another download site... or get a torrent link?

Apr 30, 2011 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

Tip

Registry Hacks


Menu Speed

When XP first appeared, there was a lot of conversation about the new interface, both good andad. In spite of the initial complaints, most users stick with the default settings rather than reverting to the Classic interface found in previous Windows versions. But you may want to change the delay you notice when you click on the Start Menu. I see no reason for there to be any delay when I click on the Start Menu. Effects are pretty, but I wouldn't click on it if I didn't have business inside, so let's get it open and get moving. The default speed can be adjusted with a quick Registry hack.
Go to the Registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop\MenuShowDelay. The default value is 400. Set it to 0 to remove the delay completely, but if you do that it will be nearly impossible to move the mouse fast enough not to activate All Programs if you mouse over it en route to your final selection. Pick a number that suits your style, make the change, then test it until you find a good compromise between speed and usability.
Place Windows Kernel into RAM
It's a given that anything that runs in RAM will be faster than an item that has to access the hard drive and virtual memory. Rather than have the kernel that is the foundation of XP using the slower Paging Executive functions, use this hack to create and set the DisablePagingExecutive DWORD to a value of 1.
Edit the Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\ Session Manager\Memory Management\DisablePagingExecutive to 1 to disable paging and have the kernel run in RAM (set the value to 0 to undo this hack). Exit the Registry and reboot. Perform this hack only if the system has 256 MB or more of installed RAM!
Disable 8.3 Name Creation in NTFS
Files that use the 8.3 naming convention can degrade NTFS drive performance. Unless you have a good reason for keeping the 8.3 naming convention intact (such as if you're using 16-bit programs), a performance gain can be achieved by disabling it:
Set the Registry DWORD key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\ FileSystem\NtfsDisable8dot3NameCreation to 1. Exit the Registry and reboot.

Whenever you surf the Web, you leave yourself open to being snooped upon by web sites. They can track your online travels, know what operating system and browser you're running, find out your machine name, peer into your clipboard, uncover the last sites you've visited, examine your history list, delve into your cache, examine your IP address and use that to learn basic information about you such as your geographic location, and more. To a great extent, your Internet life is an open book when you visit.
Don't believe me? Head to http://www.anonymizer.com/snoop/test_ip.shtml. This page, run by the Anonymizer.com web service, tells you what your IP address and machine name are. And that's just a start. Click on the links on the left side, such as "Exposed Clipboard" and "Geographical Location." You'll see just a small sampling of what web sites can learn about you.
Much of the reason why web sites can find out this information about you is due to the trusting nature of the Internet's infrastructure and is inherent in the open client/server relationship between your web browser and the servers on the sites you visit. But a lot of it also has to do with the ability to match up information from your PC to information in publicly available databases—for example, databases that have information about IP addresses.
The best way to make sure web sites can't gather personal information about you and your computer is to surf anonymously; use an anonymous proxy server to sit between you and the web sites you visit. When you use an anonymous proxy server, your browser doesn't contact a web site directly. Instead, it tells a proxy server which web site you want to visit. The proxy server then contacts the web site, and when you get the web site's page you don't get it directly from the site. Instead, it's delivered to you by the proxy server. In that way, your browser never directly contacts the web server whose site you want to view. The web site sees the IP address of the proxy server, not your PC's IP address. It can't read your cookies, see your history list, or examine your clipboard and cache, because your PC is never in direct contact with it. You're able to surf anonymously, without a trace.
There are two primary ways to use anonymous proxy servers. You can run client software on your PC, which does the work of contacting the server for you, or you can instead visit a web site, which then does the work of contacting the server.

on Mar 20, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

I recive message on start the computer "Internet explorer 6 security prihibit runing ActiveX controls" and i do not view the filles, any filles!


Hi there,

cause:

This issue occurs if the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration feature is enabled. By default, the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration feature is enabled in Internet Explorer on Windows Server 2003-based computers.

This enhanced level of security may prevent certain Web sites from displaying as expected in Internet Explorer. For example, programs that require the Web browser may not work as expected because scripts, ActiveX controls, and downloads are disabled.

Resolution:

To resolve this issue, add the following Macromedia Web sites
  • http://www.macromedia.com
  • http://fpdownload.macromedia.com
  • http://sdc.shockwave.com
to the Trusted sites zone in Internet Explorer. To do so, follow these steps:
  1. Start Internet Explorer (if it is not already running).
  2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.
  3. Click the Security tab.
  4. Under Select a Web content zone to specify its security settings, click Trusted sites, and then click Sites.
  5. In the Add this Web site to the zone box, type http://www.macromedia.com, and then click Add, type http://fpdownload.macromedia.com.
  6. Click Add, type http://sdc.shockwave.com, and then click Add.

    The Macromedia Web sites are displayed in the Web sites list.
  7. Click Close, and then click OK.
Good to know information:

The Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration feature configures several security settings that define how you access Internet and intranet Web sites. The configuration also reduces the exposure of your server to Web sites that may pose a security risk. To log on to a Web site that requires Internet Explorer functionality that is disabled by the Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration feature, add that Web site to the Trusted sites zone in Internet Explorer.

For more information about Internet Explorer Enhanced Security Configuration, see the Internet Explorer "Enhanced Security Configuration" Help topic. To do so (on a computer that is running Windows Server 2003), start Internet Explorer, and then on the Help menu, click Enhanced Security Configuration.

Dec 24, 2010 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

?500 Internal Server Error? 100% 2003 Gateway 700S PC 2002 Windows XP Home Edition Late 8/20 or early 8/21 ?Guru? recommended I change my web browser from Internet Explorer to Foxfire Foxfire...


hi Fixing 500 errors - general
This error can only be resolved by fixes to the Web server software. It is not a client-side problem. It is up to the operators of the Web server site to locate and analyse the logs which should give further information about the error. Fixing 500 errors - CheckUpDown Please contact us (email preferred) whenever you encounter 500 errors on your CheckUpDown account. We then have to liaise with your ISP and the vendor of the Web server software so they can trace the exact reason for the error. Correcting the error may require recoding program logic for the Web server software, which could take some time. try sending email of your problems to support.microsoft.com.hope this helps sorry it sounds so complicated.

Aug 23, 2010 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

Hi , We are having 2 windows servers with identical configuration, and also we are using the windows 2003 with vendor application, We installed 8 GB of RAM in both server , But I could only 4 GB amount...


Hi

To reply your query in short. If you have any of the following versions of server it would support the maximum RAM upto 4 GB.

Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard Edition
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition SP1
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition SP2
Windows Storage Server 2003
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
Windows Small Business Server 2003

If you are using : Windows Server 2003, Web Edition
It will support only 2 GB of RAM

For your information to get a complete information about Memory Limits for Windows Releases. Please visit the following site:

(msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/aa366778.aspx)

If you find it useful please do not forget to rate this solution.

Jul 14, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise...

1 Answer

Cookie: VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE=I6ULXOL2hYU; __utma=27069237.3582438350991212000.1239168012.1245777657.1245801341.248; __utmz=27069237.1245220189.213.2.utmcsr=xat.com|utmccn=(referral)


In computing, a cookie (also tracking cookie, browser cookie, and HTTP cookie) is a small piece of text stored on a user's computer by a web browser. A cookie consists of one or more name-value pairs containing bits of information such as user preferences, shopping cart contents, the identifier for a server-based session, or other data used by websites.
It is sent as an HTTP header by a web server to a web browser and then sent back unchanged by the browser each time it accesses that server. A cookie can be used for authenticating, session tracking (state maintenance), and remembering specific information about users, such as site preferences or the contents of their electronic shopping carts. The term "cookie" is derived from "magic cookie", a well-known concept in UNIX computing which inspired both the idea and the name of browser cookies. Some alternatives to cookies exist; each has its own uses, advantages, and drawbacks.
Being simple pieces of text, cookies are not executable. They are neither spyware or viruses, although cookies from certain sites are detected by many anti-spyware products because they can allow users to be tracked when they visit various sites.
Most modern browsers allow users to decide whether to accept cookies, and the time frame to keep them, but rejecting cookies makes some websites unusable. For example, shopping carts or login systems implemented using cookies do not work if cookies are disabled.


Souce: WIKI

I hope this information helps you

Jon

Jun 24, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

Cannot Open DSA.MSC file error


When you install the Administration Tools Pack on a computer that is running Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in file (Dsa.msc) is installed in the %windir%\Syswow64 folder. Additionally, the computer's file system maps the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to the following path: DriveLetter:\%windir%\Syswow64\Dsa.mscHowever, the Active Directory Domains and Trust MMC snap-in incorrectly specifies the path of the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in as follows: DriveLetter:\%windir%\System32\Dsa.mscWhen the computer's file system tries to locate the Dsa.msc file from within the Active Directory Domains and Trust MMC snap-in, Mmc.exe is run. Mmc.exe is run because the Dsa.msc file is associated with Mmc.exe. When Mmc.exe is run, it uses the following path to locate Dsa.msc: DriveLetter:\%windir%\System32\Dsa.msc DomainPathAfter the Mmc.exe command is run, the Active Directory Domains and Trust MMC snap-in tries to locate the Dsa.msc file. Because the Dsa.msc file does not exist in the %windir%\System32 folder, the error message that is mentioned in the "Symptoms" section is generated.

To resolve this problem, manually copy the Dsa.msc file from the %windir%\Syswow64 folder to the %windir%\System32 folder.

Your hardware manufacturer provides technical support and assistance for Microsoft Windows x64 editions. Your hardware manufacturer provides support because a Windows x64 edition was included with your hardware. Your hardware manufacturer might have customized the Windows x64 edition installation with unique components. Unique components might include specific device drivers or might include optional settings to maximize the performance of the hardware. Microsoft will provide reasonable-effort assistance if you need technical help with your Windows x64 edition. However, you might have to contact your manufacturer directly. Your manufacturer is best qualified to support the software that your manufacturer installed on the hardware.

For product information about Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/64bit/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/64bit/default.mspx) For product information about Microsoft Windows Server 2003 x64 editions, visit the following Microsoft Web site:http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/64bit/x64/editions.mspx

May 30, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Server 2003 AD


Hello Dolly, and welcome to FixYa.
As I´m not sure if you want to make a folder for a Domain user or a Local user, so I´ll give you both.
Domain user:
Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> Active Directory Users and Computers.
In the console tree, click Users.
In the Details pane, right-click the user account, and then click Properties.
In the Properties dialog box, click Profile.
Under the Home folder, type the folder information. To do this, follow these steps:
To assign a home folder on a network server, click Connect, and then specify a drive letter.
In the To box, type a path. This path can be any one of the following types:
Network path, for example: \\server\users\test
You can substitute username for the last subfolder in the path, for example: \\server\users\username
NOTE: server is the name of the file server housing the home folders, and users are the shared folder.
Click OK.
- next in the next comment:

Dec 11, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers

How to configure FTP server in windows xp prof ?


Setting up an FTP site Using Windows XP Professional Windows XP professional (as well as Windows 2000) includes Microsoft's IIS (Internet Information Server) which can be used to create an FTP site on your computer. It's a fair bit less complicated and less flexible than using some third-party FTP server software packages, so we will give you guides for setting up both. If you are using XP Home you will need to use third-party software. There is no way to publish an FTP site with the Home Edition of XP.
The first step is to check that IIS (Internet Information Services, Microsoft's web-server application) is configured properly.
Go to start\'control panel'\'add/remove programs'\ choose the 'add/remove windows components' button from the bar on the left. Highlight the item 'Internet information services (IIS)' If it is unchecked, check it, then click 'details.'
ftparticle_2.gif

The components you will need are: 'common files,' 'file transfer protocol (FTP) service' and 'internet information services snap-in.' Uncheck any others then click next. IIS will configure itself, and you may be prompted for the XP CD.

Mar 21, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64...

1 Answer

Asp


Hi, Have you checked your security permissions on the 2003 IIS ?

Are the users using it as Intranet or Internet?

Is the site internal/external or possibly firewalled with rules restricting correct port operation and access permissions?

x-b-m

Feb 19, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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