Question about Nikon 100mm f/2.8 Lens

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Manual focus ring very hard to turn

This is a Nikon 100 mm f/2.8 Series E... it was used for years in photo studio for shooting portraits so the manual focus ring was hardly ever used. at present is very hard to turn the ring in order to focus the lens.

Any help?

thanks
asamado

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  • Randy Wheatley
    Randy Wheatley May 11, 2010

    asamdo,

    So it was used in autofocus mode primarily, how are you using it now? How long has it been since it was used? What camera body are you using it with now - before? I would like to know more about the combination of factors to help you come up with a solution. It is rare that a lens "freezes up" or "gets rusty" unless it has been submerged or left buried in sand. Even sitting for a long time it should turn freely.

    randy320sgi

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Unfortunately not. If the Nikon centre think it's been dropped, then you're stuck. They may well think so due to additional wear and damage caused as the initial fault progressed; this may well resemble the damage caused when a lens is dropped. You should really have sent it for repair as soon as the fault occurred.

All you can do is to write a letter of complaint to Nikon, asking them to intervene on your behalf with their authorised repair centre. It will help if you tell them how long you've been loyal to Nikon for and what other Nikon products you own; also state that if you must buy another lens that your money will instead go to one of their competitors instead and that when you replace your camera you will think hard before purchasing from Nikon again. It also helps if you tell them that you were well aware that you would be charged for any repairs caused by misuse, such as dropping your lens, and so would not have bothered to try and claim under warranty under such circumstances as it wasn't worth the risk of having to pay a big bill just to get a broken lens returned to you. Tell them that you have not dropped the lens and so you dispute their findings, and at the very least request that the lens is returned to you without charge so that you can get the lens examined by an independent repairer.

As long as your letter is polite, factual and states your argument clearly then you maximise your chances of getting them to revise their position to give you the benefit of any doubt.

Good luck.

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Testimonial: "Good honest reply and very constructive ideas for what to include in a "polite letter of complaint"."

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