Question about PC Desktops

1 Answer

I have a siemens current operated 5sz3 440 earth leakage circuit breaker and i need to know how to connect it. it will be using mains voltage (240v ) there are 4 input and 4 out put terminals. these are marked as follows, top: left to right 1, 3, 5, N bottom left to right 2, 4, 6, N. Can you help

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Teacher:

    An expert who has written 2 tips or uploaded 1 video tip.

  • Expert
  • 166 Answers

You need to see a electritian for this one man please i can see you never did this so please dont try to heart your self and seek an electritian advice please electricity kill man please dont play whid it thanks and good luck

Posted on Oct 24, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Hp-pavilion-dv7


First check your power supply earthing system.because some time earthing is not properly working than its damage electric system so we face some problem in laptop.unnecessary current was flow on motherboard than some operation going fail.

Feb 27, 2014 | PC Desktops

Tip

How to test your AC/DC Adapter or Computer Power Supply Unit.


A PSU or Power Supply Unit aka AC/DC adpater is then means by which a low tension (voltage) appliance receives its power from the 240 AV mains supply, the this is usually accompanied by the nominal current that is drawn from the PSU on load in milliamps. (e.g. 500mAmps = 0.5 Amps) most modern DC adapters are unregulated, where the output voltage is only regulated by the load current, and a smoothing Capacitor is sometimes used to reduce AC ripple on the DC Level.
If the PSU is regulated the DC Voltage that you measure using an AVO even off load will be the same as the rated current.

Also most, not all, are double insulated (indicated by small square inside a larger one) this means that it doesn't need a earth on the plug, the give away is a plastic pin instead of a metal one found in most domestic plugs with a 13A fuse.

Using Ohms Law P= I x V means that we can find out either the Current in Amps Power in Watts or the Voltage of any unit this is also called the VA rating

The Simple test is if the adapter gets really hot as soon as the you apply AC power then this may indicate catastrophic failure OR a dead short and you must turn OFF immediately the plastic may even start to melt, you may also smell electrical burning. This will also happen if you ever use a non-specific adapter on your device that has a different output voltage this will almost certianly cause damage to your device.

The main test if to test the step-down transformer using an AVO (Amps Volts Ohms) this is what is used to reduce the 240V ~AC voltage to something more in line with the required DC supply say 14-16V ~AC, a diode bridge converts this to DC, if it is regualted there will be either and either a zener or resistor drops this to the rated 12V and a capacitor to smooth the level.
You need to make sure this is socket is working correctly by checking with either a lamp electricians screw driver or a AC test plug, dont use this socket you have an earth fault or someother problem, usually two lines at the outside of a AC socket tester means all is correct.
  1. First measure the resistance (Ohms) across the two AC pins that is the Live and Neutral this should have VERY low resistance in the range 300 to 2,000 (2K) Ohms. if this is the case then your primary winding is probably OK if you see 1 on all settings this means open circuit (O/C)
  2. Then connect the power supply to a 240V AC socket, and check the output voltage with multimeter set at volts DC you should see a stable voltage of the rated value for a regulated adapter or slightly higher by about 5% if its unregulated as this is a reading off load, if you were able to test the voltage with the adapter on load you would see the rated DC voltage.
  3. If you connect an unregulated AC/DC adapter to the device and open up the cover to test it under load and the voltage is low around 5V or less then the adapter will need replacing even if the off load value appears correct in above test ( ** ref the table below)
NOTE: If you have a AC only output then the test done in 1 can also be done, if there is a diode bridge, Zener Dicde OR Capacitor on the secondary this test wont work so you might have to remove the cover by unscrewing the tamper-proof screws and test it before the connection to the PCB, without the power on of course, check out my tip HERE for help on how to remove the screws.

If you have a faulty power supply its usually the thermal fuse that blows on the secondary winding, this means that you will get considerably less Voltage at the output jack of around 5 VDC or less and falling if this is the case the transformer is faulty and will need to be replaced with one of the same step-down ratio. OR you will need a new AC/DC Adapter, check out this table for examples of the results that you might find.

f9329ce.jpg

** The Amstrad Black PSU that reports 24V and 383 Ohms on the primary may still not deliver the rated voltage under load and therefore I have marked this as a false positive and therefore FAULTY.

NOTE: The AC/DC Chargers are constant current devices (the symbol is usually two interlocking circles and even though you can do similar tests on the transformer primary coil its the current that it delivers under load that is important the only way to test this is using a clamp meter on the cable to see the current under load this should match the rated current.

COMPUTER ATX PSU

Most ATX power supplies are known as switched mode can only be tested under load when connected to the PC motherboard this is a bit tricky using a plain old Fluke, AVO or Multimeter the best way is to buy dedicated PSU tester for the type of Power Unit you have, it will check the DC voltages in the range + 12V,-12V,+5V,+5VBs and +3.3V on both the SATA and IDE supply cables these cost about £20 ($35) you can test the unit in as little as 5 mins.

on May 11, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Our 7788F keeps going into a ground fault condition. Need help troubleshooting. John


Ground Fault ???
Troubleshooting Ground Fault

Troubleshooting a ground fault circuit interrupt, or GFI, breaker is pretty straightforward. Troubleshooting the circuit itself can be quite time-consuming.
The GFI breaker is designed with a test button incorporated into the breaker itself.
Pushing the test button should trip the breaker.
On GFI-style breakers the neutral wire going into the house's outlets is connected to the breaker's neutral connector, the white neutral that comes out of the breaker is connected to the neutral bus in the panel, isolating the neutral bus from the neutral wire going into the house.
The test button actually shorts the neutral wire feeding the circuit to the neutral bus in the electrical panel creating a ground fault that should trip the breaker.
It is considered a ground fault because the neutral bus in the main electrical panel is actually connected to the ground bus through the panel's metal casing. What to do if the test button isn't tripping the breaker
1
Push the test button on the GFI breaker.
The breaker should trip.
If the breaker does not trip, then it may be that the breaker has already tripped and just looks like it's on.
The position of the switch may only move slightly from the on position towards the off position when tripped.

2
Push the switch on the GFI breaker all of the way toward the off position.
It may take some force to get the breaker to reset.
Turn the breaker back to the on position.
When the breaker has been reset properly you should feel some resistance when pushing the switch back on.



3 Push the test button again and the breaker should trip.
If the breaker still doesn't trip then you should test for power at the screw connections inside of the electrical panel.
Remove the screw that holds the dead front covering the breaker's connections.
Remove the dead front cover.

4
Test for power with your voltmeter set on AC volts on the highest scale.
For a single pole GFI breaker, touch the black lead from the tester to the silver screw on the GFI breaker and touch the red lead from the tester to the brass screw on the GFI breaker.
You should see 110 volts on the tester. If voltage is seen but the test button won't trip the breaker, then the breaker is bad and should be replaced.

5
Test for power on a two pole breaker by touching the red voltmeter lead to one of screws with a black or red wire connected to it.
Touch the black lead to the other screw with a black or red wire connected to it.
You should read 220 volts or close to it on your voltmeter.
If you read voltage and the test button won't trip, the breaker is bad and needs to be replaced.

What to do if the breaker won't reset and keeps tripping when turned on
6
Unplug everything that is plugged into any of the outlets on the circuit in question.
Try resetting the breaker again by pushing the switch all the way to the off position and then turning it back to the on position.
If it won't reset and trips when the breaker's switch hits the on position, it could be a bad breaker or a problem in the circuit itself.
7
Use your straight-tipped screwdriver to loosen the brass connection screw or screws on the GFI breaker.
Pull the black hot wire, or wires, out of the breaker's connectors.
Loosen the silver screw the white wire is connected to and remove it from the GFI breaker.

8
Push the switch all the way to the off position.
Turn the switch back to the on position.
If the breaker still won't reset, then the problem is the breaker itself and it should be replaced with a new one of the same size, brand and model.
If the breaker resets normally and the test button trips the breaker when pushed, the problem is in the circuit itself and an electrician should be called to find your ground fault.

9
Reconnect the black wire, or wires, to the brass screws on the GFI breaker.
Reconnect the white wire to the silver screw on the GFI breaker.

10
Replace the dead front cover into the breaker panel.
Install the screw or screws that hold the dead front in place.



http://www.hilo-electric.com/blank?pageid=63

Aug 14, 2013 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Hello sir, i have a dell gx620 , whenever i connect power cord to its supply. my main breaker goes trips where as when i connect it again to it oard power indication become on but system is started with on...


There is an earth leakage in your computer system. Electricity is shorting to earth.

What you want to do is eliminate the power cord as the cause of the problem. Use another power cord and multi-plug/adaptor if you are using one. If the problem stops then you know it was one of those two that was the cause of the problem.

Next up is the internal of the power supply, it is possible that the supply is full of dust that is moist, try and get out as much dust as you can with the vaccum cleaner. Put it in a dry place for a few hours.

A professional may need to inspect the internals of the Power Supply and even your computer for the cause of the short.

Take care!
damnor01

Sep 21, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Fujitsu siemens scaleo 600 desktop just keeps shutting down any ideas


1) Bad Power Supply. Power Supply has a weak voltage power rail.

Electrolytic Capacitors are breaking down inside the Power Supply.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

The capacitors build up a charge long enough to work briefly, then break down.

2) Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard are breaking down. Specifically the one's used in the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit.

A) http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

B) Visually identifying bad capacitors,

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

C) Video showing what happens with bad capacitors (Electrolytic) in the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit (Starts at 0:04)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KN6_-8fYHo0

Await your further diagnoses.

May 23, 2010 | Fujitsu Siemens SCALEO 600 (FSP:83C005617)...

1 Answer

Burnt Power Supply


You can try replacing the fuse in the power supply if it has one. Most have a permanent circuit breaker that once tripped, the power supply is no more. If you can change the fuse, there's a 90% chance it still won't work since there was a burnt oder, which indicates the fuse didn't blow fast enough to prevent more damage, like the motherboard.

May 11, 2010 | Dell Vostro 220 Desktop Computer

1 Answer

Replace 200 amp breaker


If this is the Service Disconnect Switch or Main Switch for the panel, this job should probably left for an electrician to perform, as power should be shut off at the meter socket or at the roadside first. If this is not done, the work will be "hot".

Unlike most circuit breakers in electrical panels, Service Disconnect Switches and Main Switches have the power brought to the panel by entering terminal screws. Shutting the Main or Service Disconnect breaker off prevents the flow of current *into* the panel and other circuit breakers. The large wires that are connected to the terminal screws are LIVE, and will remain so until shut off *upstream*.

Working in a panel with two large diameter cables that do not move easily is a hazard and should not be done unless you are very familiar with this work - and of course, have shut the power off.

Please, reconsider doing this work yourself.

Sep 29, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

PROGRAMMABLE ROOM THERMOSTAT


I found this on a search:
"I have the full set of instructions, contact me at gjb@eggconnect.net
Not a very reliable system, transmitter keeps resetting to 17:25; locks up. Whole system then requires setting up from scratch. Had a replacement transmitter, no change, and same faults.
GJB"
Perhaps this can help.

Mar 15, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Power supply


A crowbar or crowbar circuit is an electrical circuit used to prevent an overvoltage condition of a power supply unit from damaging the circuits attached to the power supply. It operates by putting a short circuit across the voltage source, much as if one dropped a tool of the same name across the output terminals of the power supply. Crowbar circuits are frequently implemented using a thyristor (also called an SCR) or a trisil or thyratron as the shorting device. Once triggered, they depend on the current-limiting circuitry of the power supply or, if that fails, the blowing of the line fuse or circuit breaker.
A crowbar circuit is distinct from a clamp in that, once triggered, it pulls the voltage below the trigger level, usually close to ground. A clamp prevents the voltage from exceeding a preset level. Thus, a crowbar will not automatically return to normal operation when the overvoltage condition is removed; power must be removed entirely to stop its conduction.
The advantage of a crowbar over a clamp is that the low holding voltage of the crowbar lets it carry higher fault current without dissipating much power (which could otherwise cause overheating). Also, a crowbar is more likely than a clamp to deactivate a device (by blowing a fuse or tripping a breaker), bringing attention to the faulty equipment.


The power supply is bad. I would not try to fix it.

Mar 01, 2008 | Compaq Deskpro EN PC Desktop

Not finding what you are looking for?
PC Desktops Logo

Related Topics:

72 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top PC Desktops Experts

joecoolvette
joecoolvette

Level 3 Expert

5660 Answers

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

Les Dickinson
Les Dickinson

Level 3 Expert

18297 Answers

Are you a PC Desktop Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...