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I have a hp pavilion a705 w that powers off after about 5 seconds without POST. If the connector with the 2 yellow and 2 black wires coming out of it is not connected the computers works

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Go to Control Panel and click on PRINTERS.
Then right click on your printer and click on PROPERTIES.
Click on the MAINTENANCE tab.
Look for Auto POWER and click on it.
check to see if POWER OFF is properly set
then say OK.

Hope this helps. Bud

Posted on Jan 22, 2009

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Fault finding


Power is going to the motherboard, and you know this by assuming?

An assumption would be you see the Power Supply fan spin, LED lights light up, and maybe computer case fans spin.

Not an assumption, and you would have tested the 3 main voltage power rails, coming out of the Power Supply.

The Power Supply in your computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply. (Also is known as the short abbreviation - PSU. Power Supply Unit)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

The Power Supply in your computer is a Converter.
It converts HIGH AC voltage into 3 LOW DC voltages.

[Depending on country,
USA = 120 Volts AC. UK = 240 Volts AC. Japan is 100 Volts AC, but may depend on area. Australia = 240 Volts AC. India = 240 Volts AC. HOWEVER, do not write the above in stone. I may have made an error ]

The 3 low main DC Voltages coming out of the Power Supply is;
A) 3.3 Volts DC
B) 5 Volts DC
C) 12 Volts DC

Orange wires carry 3.3 Volts DC
Red wires carry 5 Volts DC
Yellow wires carry 12 Volts DC
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They can also be called Negative wires.
This is a DC circuit now. There is a Positive, and a Negative.
Orange, Red, and Yellow wires are power wires, and also Positive wires.

The first part of your diagnosis will be to test those 3 main voltage power rails.

[Digressing;
Using an example;
There are many Red wires coming out of the Power Supply.
These are 5 Volt wires. They are Connected TO, the 5 Volt power rail in the Power Supply.
ALL 5 Volt wires end in one place, in the Power Supply.
The 5 Volt power rail.
When you test just ONE red wire, you are testing the entire 5 Volt power rail coming from the Power Supply.

This also goes for the Orange wires, and Yellow wires ]

With the Red 5 Volt wires, and Yellow 12 Volt wires, you could just use a 4-pin Peripheral power cable to check them,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Multimeter set to DC Voltage, the red (Positive) probe lead of the multimeter; touches the female metal terminal connector, for the Red wire.

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction?t=2&utm_expid=8634549-14

The black (Negative) probe lead of the multimeter, touches a female metal terminal connector, that goes to a Black wire.

You should be reading 5 Volts DC.

Same thing for the Yellow 12 Volt wire.

With an Orange 3.3 Volt wire, this changes.
A straightened out paperclip is inserted, down into the BACK of the ATX main power cable's connector; AND into a socket hole with an Orange wire in it.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The straightened out paperclip, slides down into the socket hole, with the Orange wire in it.
Slides down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the orange insulation of the wire, and MUST go down far enough; to Touch that female metal terminal connector.

EVERY wire going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, ends in a female metal terminal connector.

Same thing is down with a socket hole that has a Black wire in it.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires. (Negative)
You can choose ANY socket hole that has a Black wire in it.

Now touch the two probe leads of the multimeter, to their respective straightened out paperclips.

Red (Positive) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Orange wire socket hole.
Black (Negative) probe lead of multimeter, to straightened out paperclip in Back wire socket hole.

You should be reading 3.3 Volts DC.

(Or if your multimeter kit has special probe lead, that would take the place of a straightened out paperclip, of course use it instead)

Know this;
A) If ALL of the LED's ('lights') were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

B) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

C) A typical CPU (Processor) can use 51 to 130 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor (CPU) it is.

This is why a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, will not have enough power to turn the Processor ON, but will have enough power to light those simpy LED's, and spin fans.

[LED - Light Emitting Diode ]

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 11, 2013 | Dell Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Power failure of motherboard


"power failure of motherboard"

I'm lost. Since when does a motherboard produce power?

Power failure AT motherboard?

You have tested the 3 main voltage power rails, coming out of the Power Supply?
A) 3.3 Volts DC
B) 5 Volts DC
C) 12 Volts DC

[In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC ]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply#Wiring_diagrams

[ From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply ]

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=2439#ov

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

ALL Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
ALL Red wires are 5 Volts
ALL Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
ALL are DC Voltage

ALL Black wires are Ground wires. Means Negative wires. ( - )
All power wires named above are Positive wires. ( + )

(This is a DC circuit)

Multimeter:
Positive (Red) probe lead to power wires, one at a time.
Negative ( Black) probe lead stays connected to ANY Black wire.

Looking at the Playtool link, observe the photo to the Right.
Shows 24-pin ATX main power cable plugged into motherboard.
This is what you want.

The Back of the connector is where the wires go in.
The Back of the connector, is where the straightened out paperclip goes in.

I straighten out a paperclip, and insert down into the socket hole; of the power wire to be tested.

(Orange, or Red, or Yellow)

Straightened out paperclip, slides RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire.

Look at middle photo. See the Front of the connector? You can barely make out the ends, of the female metal terminal connectors.
This is a closer look,

http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-9420&utm_medium=Affiliate&ref=cj&utm_campaign=CommissionJunction&utm_source=CommissionJunction

At the bottom of the photo is the Front; of the female metal terminal connector.

At the Top is the Back of the connector.
The straightened out paperclip, MUST slide down into the socket hole; far enough to touch the Back of the connector.

Now do the same for ANY Black wire.
Power Supply now plugged into power, you can now touch the multimeter's probe leads, to the straightened out paperclips.

Two paperclips used at one time.
Test each voltage power rail, one at a time.

When I state Voltage Power Rail;

3.3 Volt power rail.
ALL of those Orange wires end at one central point, in the Power Supply; the 3.3 Volt power rail.

This means you can test ANY Orange wire, and be testing the 3.3 Volt power rail.

Same goes for the 5 Volt power rail. (Red wires)
Same goes for the 12 Volt power rail. (Yellow wires)

What are the voltages? Post back in a Comment.

OR,
Use a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; for a temporary test unit.

Power Supply checks out OK, or you are using a KNOWN to be good, Power Supply?

What do the Electrolytic Capacitors look like? See any bad ones?
(Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor)

http://capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lut7MX5Dd_A

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Mar 25, 2013 | Gigabyte GA-M61VME-S2 Motherboard

1 Answer

Msi mobo RS480m2 powers up on 20 pin connector occasionally,but wont power up on 24 pin connector at all. why?


What are the 'extra' 4 wires, Cyprian?

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

They are 2 Yellow, 1 Red, and 1 Black.

Red = 5 Volt wire
Yellow = 12 Volt wire
Black = Ground wire

You have a bad Power Supply, with a weak voltage power rail.

There are 3;
A) 3.3 Volt power rail, (Orange wires are 3.3 Volt)
B) 5 Volt power rail
C) 12 Volt power rail

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply#Wiring_diagrams

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psurailhistory/rails.html

1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what Processor it is.

MicroStar Intenational RS480M2 can use processors that take a LOT of Wattage,

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/RS480M2.html#/?div=Detail

With a weak voltage power rail you do not have enough power, to turn the Processor on, and keep it on.

Picture that.

Do you wish to test the Power Supply?
Or do you have a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; that you can borrow for a test unit?

Post back in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 18, 2012 | MSI Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Ms 7500


Orient the motherboard so we are both looking at it the same way;

Processor to the Top, black and white Ram Memory slots to the Right, white PCI slot, and black PCI Express x16 slot to the Left;

Above the white Ram Memory slots, is the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable connector. Whitish, square, 4 socket hole connector.
General example of this power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Right next to it is a black header.
The Front Panel header, (Panel1)
This is the pinout,

http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Desktop-Hardware/HP-Pavilion-h8z-1150-Motherboard-Headers-front-panel/td-p/1266199


Scroll down to Dave G's post.

4 pins across one side, 5 pins across the other side.

The side with 4 pins has the pins numbered EVEN.
The side with 5 pins is numbered ODD.

START on the OPPOSITE side of the missing pin.
As you can see there is -> No Pin 10.
The pin on the other end is Pin 2.

Pins 2, 4, 6, and 8. No Pin 10.

Other side;
Pins 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9.

A) Pins 1 and 3 are for the HarDDrive activity LED. (Light)
Pin 1 is for the Positive ( + ) wire.
If the HDD LED is dim when the harddrive is active, switch the wires around.

2) Pins 5 and 7 are for a Reset switch, IF a Reset switch is used.

3) Pin 9 is N/C. Not Connected. Reserved for the factory

4) Pins 2 and 4 are for the Power On LED. (Light Emitting Diode)
Pin 2 is for the Positive ( + ) wire.
If the PWR LED is dim when the computer is on, switch the wires around.

5) Pins 6 and 8 are for the Power On switch.

6) No Pin 10

Also,

http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c01410074/c01410074.pdf

The above is a PDF file, Illustrated Parts and Service Map, of the HP Compaq DC5850 Desktop PC.

If it doesn't work just by clicking on it, then copy it, and paste it in your browser search bar. Then press the Enter key.

[This is a PDF file. The computer you are using now has Adobe Reader on it, which uses PDF files.

After you click on the link it may take up to 30 seconds, before the first page comes up ]

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 09, 2012 | Dell HP DC5850 MS-7500 AM2 SYSTEM BOARD

1 Answer

I am looking forthewireing for a hp pavilion xt919


A) Power cables from Power Supply to motherboard:

1) Product information > Product specifications > HP Pavilion XT919 Desktop PC Product Specifications and What Ships in the Box,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bph06613&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en&product=58461

2) According to my sources the motherboard is an Asus CUW-AM,

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&taskId=120&prodSeriesId=46171&prodTypeId=12454&prodSeriesId=46171&objectID=bph07170

If this indeed holds to be true, scroll the page down, look at the illustration under the Figure 1: Motherboard layout, heading.
Look at number 22 on the right; ATXPWR

Now scroll down to the motherboard photo.
The white connector with two columns of 10 socket holes, to the right of the black Ram memory slots, is ATXPWR.

Proper name is 20-pin ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard. This is an example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective motherboard connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Note in the three photos the Lock on the side of the power cable connector, and the Tab on the side of the motherboard connector.
The Lock operates like a see-saw on a playground.

To remove the power cable the top is squeezed in, and this causes the hooked end of the Lock to come away from the Tab.
When the 20-pin ATX main power cable is deemed to be properly installed tightly to the motherboard, the hooked end of the Lock will be over the Tab.

B) IDE (PATA) harddrive uses a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable.
So does the Optical Drive/s,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Note the rounded corners when plugging it in.
{Power cable has been misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable. Molex came up with the connector design. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an adjustable open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

C) Floppy drives and card readers use a 4-pin small Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

D) Number 6 -> SYS_FAN, is where the Processor fan plugs in.
SYS_FAN stands for System Fan. A computer case fan. The illustration is wrong.

E) Number 21 is PS_FAN.
That to me stands for Power Supply Fan. Another misnomer. The Power Supply has it's own fan, and doesn't need power from the motherboard for it.
I'll bet this is where a System Fan, or computer case fan, would connect.

F) Number 29 points to the Primary IDE connector on the motherboard.
This is where the 40-pin IDE flat ribbon cable, plugs in for the Harddrive.

Number 24, Secondary IDE, is where the Optical Drive's, IDE flat ribbon cable plugs in.

Note*
The rectangular connectors for the IDE flat ribbon cables, has a 'bump', or protrusion, on the outside edge towards the middle,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PATA-cable.jpg

In this photo it is at the top/middle. There are different styles. Square block, or the two piece design shown.
These bumps, or protrusions line up with a cutout.

A cutout on the motherboard connector, or a cutout on the circuit boards for the harddrive, and optical drive.

IF there is no bump, or protrusion;
There is a faint red strip on one side of the IDE (PATA) flat ribbon cable.

The red strip denotes which side Number 1 wire is on. Number 1 wire in the cable, for number 1 pin in it's connector/s.

http://pinouts.ru/DiskCables/IDE_pinout.shtml

Here you can see by the pinout above, that for the black Primary IDE connector, and the blue Secondary IDE connector, Number 1 pin is at the Top.
Red stripe on edge of IDE cable will be at the top, when the cable is attached.

When plugging into a harddrive, or optical drive, Number 1 pin ALWAYS goes toward the power cable.
Towards the 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable.
Red stripe will be towards 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable.

H) Number 14 CD_IN is where the audio cable from the MAIN optical drive plugs into. If you have two optical drives only the main, or Primary optical drive audio cable plugs into the motherboard.

I) The front of your computer is the Front Panel.
The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the main wires from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Under the photo of the motherboard, the pinout for the Front Panel header is shown, though not very legible.
In the illustration the Front Panel header is Number 30 - Panel.

Looking at the pinout, and looking at the actual Front Panel header on the motherboard photo, it looks as though they have the pinout upside down, in relation to how it actually is.

Note in the motherboard photo, the Front Panel header is shown with 5 pins across the Top, then a space, then 4 more pins.
The Bottom row is 10 pins in a row.

In the Front Panel header pinout, they show 10 pins going across the Top. 4 pins going across the bottom, a space, then 5 pins.

Upside down.

I think it should be this way,

Top Row starting on the Left side going towards the Right;
Pins 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, No Pin, 14, 16, 18, and 20.

Bottom Row starting on the Left side going towards the Right;
Pins 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19.

1) Pins 2 and 4 are for a Reset switch, IF a Reset switch is used.

2) Pins 6, 8, and 10 are for the Power On LED. (Light)
This is for a computer that has 'Turbo'
Dual light Power On LED. May have Green and Yellow lights.

Green for 'Turbo', and Yellow for Normal.
Bunch of hooey, really.

'Turbo' mode is the computer operating in a normal mode, and Normal mode really is the computer slowed down.

Pin 10 is for the Negative ( - ) wire.
Pin 6 and Pin 8 are the Positive ( + ) wires. One for the Green side of the Power On LED, one for the Yellow side of the Power On LED.

3) No Pin 12

4) Pins 14, and 16 are for the HarDDrive activity LED. (Light)
Pin 14 for the Positive ( + ) wire.
If the HDD LED is dim when the Harddrive is active, switch the wires around.

5) Pins 18 and 20 are for the Power On switch.

6) Pins 1, 3, 5 and 7 are for an internal speaker. Used to hear BIOS Beep Codes.
Pin 3 is for the Negative wire ( - ), and Pin 7 is for the Positive ( + ) wire.

7) Pins 9 and 11 N/C. Not Connected. (External SMI lead)

8) Pins 13 and 15 are for a Keylock switch.
Some computers have a Keylock. Unlocked the computer will come on.
I -> believe, Not connecting anything to these two pins, is like having the Keylock in the unlocked position.
May be wrong. May have to have a jumper wire across these two pins for the computer to work.

9) Pins 17 and 19 are for a Message LED
(Sleep/Standby)

HOWEVER, the best method IMHO is to use an LED light, and touch two pins at a time, to see which ones are for the Power On switch.
When the computer comes on, (Power Supply), then you know which pins are for the Power On switch.

Computer running, do not touch those two pins again, and check the rest of the pins.
Computer turns off, and starts again? Restart switch
LED light blinks? Harddrive activity LED
LED light stays on steady? Power On LED.

Finding which two pins are for the Power On switch, also helps tell you where the rest of the pins are, by looking at the pinout on the HP Support page.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bph05159

Scroll down to Figure 4: Front panel connectors
Same Front Panel header used for this TriGem (Cognac) motherboard.
Clearer though.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 02, 2012 | HP Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Front panel connectors


Black or white is negative, color is positive. Pin 1 is usually positive.

Also, If you look closely at the plastic plug, there *should* be a tiny triangle/arrow....that's the "+".

May 18, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

The monitor turns off, it becomes bluish black, but PC continues to run My PC has a CPU AMD Athlon 64bit X2 Dual Core 5000 AM2 2GB Memory, 500GB partitioned into 3 approximately the same size each. foxconn...


Do you have a substitute Power Supply you can use for a test? May sound inane, but there are those who have an unused computer sitting around due to upgrading, or what have you, and the Power Supply is good, and compatible.

(Compatible: Is the correct size and shape to fit in the computer case, and has the minimum required power cables)

A bad Power Supply with a weak voltage rail will emulate the conditions you have described. Enough power to light LED lights, and maybe spin fans, but not enough power to turn the Processor on, or keep it running.

1) IF all the LED lights were on at once they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
AMD Athlon X2 5000+?
Can use up to 89 Watts,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_Athlon_64_microprocessors#.22Windsor.22_.28F2_.26_F3.2C_90_nm.29

Am I stating to run out, and buy a replacement Power Supply if no substitute is available for a test unit?
No.
Test the voltages of the Power Supply when plugged in, and computer running.

This will require a multimeter. An inexpensive multimeter can be purchased for around $8 to $12.
They are available in a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is one example.

Multimeters come in Analog, or Digital. Doesn't matter which kind you get. I prefer Analog with a needle and scale.

The Red probe lead is the Positive lead.
The Black probe lead is the Negative lead.
The Positive lead always touches the power wire. The Negative probe lead always touches a Ground (Black) wire.

The Function knob is set to DC Voltage. (Symbol is a dotted line over a solid line)
If there is a multi-position, set it to the 0-50 volt scale.

There are three main voltages to test.
1) The 3.3 Volt power rail
2) The 5 Volt power rail
3) The 12 Volt power rail.

In the cables coming from the Power Supply;
Orange insulated wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

You can test ANY of the wires, as they all end in one point for each voltage, in the Power Supply.

All Orange 3.3 Volt wires go back to one central point in the Power Supply.
This is the 3.3 Volt power rail.

All Red 5 Volt wires go back to one central point in the Power Supply.
This is the 5 Volt power rail.

All Yellow wires go back to one central point in the Power Supply.
This is the 12 Volt power rail.

ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

For example;
4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

The Red wire is 5 Volts. The Yellow wire is 12 Volts. The two Black wires are Ground wires.

4-pin standard Peripheral power cable unplugged, the Positive probe lead is inserted into the Front of the connector to the Red wire. (The Back of the connector is where the wires go in)

Computer plugged in, and turned on.
The Negative probe lead is touched to ANY of the two Black wires.
You should read 5 Volts.

(Shock warning: Two D cell batteries produce 3 Volts DC.
There is no shock to be concerned with. There may be however, a small spark when the Negative probe lead is touched to a Black wire. There may not be a spark)

Same procedure for the Yellow 12 Volt wire.

To test the 3.3 Volt power rail you need an Orange wire. This is in the 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The 24-pin ATX main power cable is left connected to the motherboard. A paper clip is straightened out, then inserted into the Back of the connector.
The back of the connector is where the wires go in.

The paper clip is inserted RIGHT NEXT TO the Orange wire in the socket hole. The paper clip MUST go down in far enough to touch a metal terminal.
At the end of every wire going down into that connector, is a metal terminal end.
It is approximately 3/8ths to 1/2 inch down in the socket hole.

Computer unplugged from power, the paper clip is inserted down into the Orange wire's socket hole.
Computer plugged back into power, and turned on, the Negative probe lead touches ANY Black wire.
Doesn't have to be in the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.
(However you can use a paper clip on a Black wire in the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, also. Just be SURE the two paper clips Do Not touch each other. I would connect to a Black wire in an unplugged 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable)

I think it may be Electrolytic Capacitors breaking down in the Power Supply. Causes a weak voltage power rail, or power rails.
Electrolytic Capacitors can also break down on the motherboard,

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

If we go along with your last statement, which leads me to believe you may think there is a problem with the integrated graphics chipset, (VIA K8M890), then use a graphics card, and bypass the integrated graphics.

Also make sure the inside of the computer is clean.
The two main reasons for computer failure is a bad Power Supply, and a dirty computer inside.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 09, 2011 | Foxconn K8M890M2MB-RS2H AM2 VIA K8M890...

2 Answers

No power when connecting atx12V on main


did you plug in the 24 pin main of the power supply in some also take a 4 pin as well on board jim

Jul 17, 2011 | ASUS P5VDC-X Motherboard

1 Answer

Hp palilivon a 1100y lost all power will not come back on i checked all cords power source everything seems to be ok. but no power still?


I'm going to base this solution on two scenarios from the info you have posted.

1) The power to your home/business went out. Now it's back on.

2) The power has been on all along, and the computer quit.


Based on 1) above;

The Power On switch could be bad, or the Power Supply.

A voltage spike could have occurred, and taken out the ATX power on switch.
(A generic ATX Power On switch is around $5. Example,

http://www.axiontech.com/prdt.php?item=78201 )

A voltage spike could have taken out a power supply that is of low quality, and/or on it's last leg.

The power supply used in an HP Pavilion a1100y desktop computer is of low quality.
Low quality components are used inside.
(Bestec, and Delta are two of the low quality power supply's used by HP in this time frame)

Plus add to the fact that the computer has some age on it, (5 years old?), and could be dirty inside.
Dirt,dust, etc. 'kills' computers and power supply's.

There is a simple test to perform to see whether the problem is the Power Supply, or the Power On switch.
(The Power On switch is located within the plastic Power On button assembly)
If you wish to know how to perform this test please post in a Comment.
(Free)


Based on 2) above;
The Power Supply is bad.
The test would be either to use a multimeter, and check the three main voltages coming out of the Power Supply,
Or,
Substitute the power supply with a KNOWN to be good compatible unit.
(250 to 300 Watt)

(Sometimes access to another known to be good, compatible power supply may be obtained from a computer that is no longer in use. The user has upgraded to a better computer.
Compatible being that the Power Supply has the required Wattage, and required power cables)

[The three main voltages produced by an SMPS (Switched-Mode Power Supply) used by the Pavilion a1100y desktop computer are;

A) 3.3 Volts DC (Orange wire)
B) 5 Volts DC (Red wire)
C) 12 Volts DC (Yellow wire)
In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC ]

This is HP Support>Pavilion a1100y desktop computer> Motherboard Specifications,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00499325&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&site=null&lang=en&key=null&product=1118244

Looking at the motherboard illustration, and photo at the bottom of the page, we can see what power cables are needed for the motherboard;

A) 24-pin ATX main power cable
(Connector on motherboard illustration marked as ATXPWER1. In the photo it is whitish, and has two vertical columns of 12 square socket holes. It is to the Right of the Ram Memory slots)

B) 4-pin ATX main power cable.
(Connector on motherboard illustration is marked ATX12V. It is to the left of the Intel Northbridge chipset - Intel 915GV GMCH.
In the photo it is the whitish square connector with four square socket holes. It is to the Left of the
aluminum finned Heatsink, sitting on top of the Intel Northbridge chipset)

Other power cables needed are;
1) A SATA power cable for the SATA harddrive
2) One or two 4-pin Peripheral (Standard) power cables for the optical drive/s. (CD/DVD drives)

The Processor fan cable attaches to the motherboard. (CPU_FAN)
The computer case fan attaches to the motherboard. (SYS_FAN)

The ATX form factor is used primarily for describing a motherboard.
Form Factor denotes the size, and shape, and power cables for a Power Supply.

The ATX form factor for a Power Supply;
Size: Approximately 6 inches Wide, 5-1/2 inches Long, and 3-1/2 inches Tall.

A $40 ATX power supply with 300 Watts will do just fine. No need to buy an expensive Power Supply based on advertising as a direct substitute.

One example of an inexpensive reliable ATX power supply for a Pavilion a1100y desktop computer,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1389575&CatId=1078

Has all the power cables you'll need. Actual maximum wattage rating is 350 Watts.
Information,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/332

For additional questions or to clarify anything I have stated, please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Jun 21, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Wire came loose on pavilion xe 734 that supplie power to hard dir


First of all these wires don't supply power to HDD. These wires are for indicator LEDs on the front
panel of the cabinet. One wire `power sw' is to switch on the system from the power button on front panel. `power led' wire is of the power led on the front panel. All these wires will be connected to the cluster of pins on one corner of the mother board. If you can see it will be indicated & printed near the cluster of pins on the mbd, that which pair of pins is meant for what connector. Try to correlate the names on connector with the print on the mbd.

Jan 06, 2009 | HP Computers & Internet

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