Question about Coleman (5040B750) Patio Heater

Open Question

Regulator may be bad; not enough gas coming out at the top

I have disassembled a large portion of the unit. I can hear the propoane coming out at the top with a slight hissing noice but the smell of propane is very slight. The propane tank is full and functional and I have cleaned out the top section where the gas is emitted. Has the regulator gone bad or is there another issue?

Posted by on

  • Dale Koehn
    Dale Koehn May 11, 2010

    thanks for your question, it could be that you have a bad regulator, but has it been overly cold ? how many appliances does the propane feed ? are any of the other appliances affected as well ? is the regulator very old ? It could be you have air in the lines and need to bleed them at each appliance, please get back to us and let us know what you find, then we will be able to help you nail down your problem, thanks again, mr.grzz

×

1 Suggested Answer

  • 4736 Answers

SOURCE: coleman heater model 5445c700 propane camp heater

If you're using a 20lb propane tank (Gas Grill Tank), that may be the problem. Turn off the propane tank at the tank valve and disconnect it from the tank. Wait 5 minutes and reattach the heater hose to the tank. Turn the propane tank valve on very,very slowly until it's all the way open. Try lighting your heater now. If the pilot flame height returned to normal, that was the problem.

FYI - The Thermocouple has nothing to do with the length of the pilot flame. It's a safety feature that stops the gas if the pilot flame goes out for any reason.

Hope that solves your problem. Please let me know.

Rich

Posted on Feb 07, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a Procom MN300HPA ventless heater and the pilot will not light with well gas. Is there some type of converison necessary to get this unit to work or do I need to get a new unit. ProCom will not...


yea,they don't want any liability.a pressure conversion for most gas valves is simply changing a spring.you can get an adjustable regulator if yours doesn't come apart.sounds like you have enough pressure I'd take the piolit apart and open up the orfice hole its real tiny.also burner hole could be widened a bit.I'd never do this for a customer because of liabality,but would be safe as long safties are in place

Dec 24, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Gas furnace in older trailer house. I can get the pilot light to come on but it will not stay on. I put a new thermocoupling in place. when I letgo go of the piolet light on the regulator the light...


make sure your thermocouple is located in the direct path of the pilot flame. if not the thermocouple will not heat up enough to send the low voltage signal to the gas valve.

Nov 27, 2010 | Coleman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Fan comes one, should hear whooshing of ignition,


On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

Jan 27, 2010 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

My Home propane tank was empty, I just had it filled, but when I go to turn on the heat, a flame icon comes up. I noticed on the heater it has an on/off switch for the automatic pilot light. I am not sure...


Make sure all switches are on and open. It may take a few attempts to get gas to the burners so you may have to reset the furnace by either the Emergency switch or circuit breaker. If it takes longer than 3 tries, you may have a gas regulator problem and will need to call your gas company for repair. The regulator belongs to the gas company so they shouldn't charge you to repair or replace.

On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

Jan 04, 2010 | Coleman Propane Forced Air Heater...

1 Answer

Yokr gas furnace will not start up


You could have the gas co to check to preassures at or before the unit. Too low or high a preassure and the gas valve cant regulate the proper flow>>Natural gas to the house needs at least 5"-wc psi ---to the gas valve needs 7.5"--wc and while its calling for heat the orrifice needs 3.5" -wc psi! Propane needs 11" wc psi to the valve on the unit and 11' -wc psi to the inside furnace.

Dec 21, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Glo Warm propane heater won't light


There is really not a lot to go wrong with the heater itself so my first guess would be that the regulator is bad, not letting the proper amount of gas through. You can check it for leaks with a bottlee of soapy water but even if you don't see a leak there is a rubber gasket inside with a pressure spring that is probably bad.

Feb 04, 2009 | Desa International GWP20T GLOWARM Wall...

2 Answers

Patio heater


There must be a blockage in the hose and regulator or your large tank may be checking and not allowing the unit to stay lit. Remove the large bottle. Let the gas line equalize for about 30 seconds and then reattach the bottle. Very slowly, open the knob on the large tank and I mean very slowly. Did I say open it slowly. The new OPD propane tanks often have a very touchie excess control valve that won't allow enough gas through if opened too rapidly. Now tray and light the heater. If you still experience the same, get a technician involved so they can inspect the gas pressure.

Oct 23, 2007 | Heating & Cooling

23 Answers

Patio heater won't stay lit


I had this same problem - here's how I fixed it...

First: Never modify the safety features of your heater as has been suggested elsewhere on this forum. Modification of these features may allow the heater to work, but greatly compromises the safety of anyone near the heater.

The problem with the heater shutting off is most likely due to not enough gas flowing through the pilot orifice (this orifice is almost as small as the diameter of a human hair). When this happens, the pilot flame does not burn vigorously enough to activate the thermocouple. Hence, the thermocouple shuts off the gas and the burner goes out - usually you'll hear one "click" when this happens.

This is a maintence thing - meaning you may have to do this as a seasonal activity.

Here we go....
(1) Shut off the gas at the tank - or remove the tank entirely.
(2) Remove the screws that hold the burner shield and top shroud from the unit - set it aside.
(3) Remove the control knob - it just pulls straight off.
(4) Remove the panel immediately behind the knob you just took off. This will expose the gas valve assembly.
(5) Remove the cover that encloses the bottom of the pilot light/igniter (assembly). This will expose the bottom of the pilot assembly.
(6) Remove the screw holding the pilot assembly - there is a small hex nut on top, but under the burner that you'll have to hold to prevent it from turning. This will free the pilot assembly allowing you to gently pull it out of the pilot assembly housing. DON"T pull hard or you may break the gas line or thermocouple.
(7) Remove the hex nut that attaches the gas line to the pilot assembly and gently pull the gas line out. At this point, to ensure you have gas flowing through the pilot gas line, you may want to re-attach the gas tank, turn it on, gently move the gas line as far away from the spark ignitor as possible, temporarily replace the control knob, and turn the knob to the "Pilot" position & push it in. DO NOT DO THIS ANYWHERE NEAR AN OPEN FLAME OR A LIGHTED CIGARETTE! You should be able to hear a hissing sound as the gas flows. If you do not hear it, the problem may be with your gas valve, and if that's the case, I'm sorry this procedure likely won't solve the problem.
(8) Remove the pilot light tube (orifice) from the mounting bracket. There's a hex nut on the back side that holds it in. Be careful not to damage the hex nut or the threads. You'll need a pair of pliers (to hold the bracket) and an adjustable wrench for the hex nut. Make note of the orientation of the pilot burner diverter so you can put it back together the same way it came apart.
(9) Using a blast of compressed air, blow air through the pilot orifice. You should be able to see just a very (and I mean very) small pin-point of light through the pilot burner. If not, use a single strand of very fine wire - like one strand from a 18 gauge braided electrical wire - and run it through the pilot orifice. Carbon build-up can clog this orifice - which can prevent the pilot from burning vigorously enough to heat up the thermocouple. Cleaning it out periodically will likely solve the problem.

Put everything back together in reverse order as noted above - making sure your gas fittings are tight and don't leak. Once it's all back together, light the pilot flame as normal and once the thermocouple heats up, the heater should work like a charm.

Oct 03, 2007 | Williams 2509612 Ceramic Mid-Size Heater

Not finding what you are looking for?
Coleman (5040B750) Patio Heater Logo

Related Topics:

220 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Coleman Heating & Cooling Experts

Bill Long

Level 3 Expert

587 Answers

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2046 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8205 Answers

Are you a Coleman Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...