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Web server and web browser

What is the difference between web server and web browser? Give some examples.

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Web server stores websites allifo and databse .
Browser read the html or xml code.then give output on page.
Example are:
web server :apache server.
Browser:mozila firefox

Posted on Jan 21, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Babylon has become my default search engine and I cannot change it back to Google (what is the difference between a search engine and a browser?


Hello,

A browser is the program you are using for browsing the internet. Examples of browsers are Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome. Search engine are the website or add-ons to a web browser that you use to search the internet. Examples of search engines are Google, Yahoo and Bing.

Please indicate the browser you are using so I can instruct you how to change back your search engine to Google.


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You can rate my answer if you appreciate it.

-damneddle

Oct 10, 2011 | Intel Computers & Internet

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Error 404


Hi.<br /> <br /> 404 error page not found means that the computer is connected to the Internet, but that it cannot find the page linked to the domain name (that www.something.com, aka URL), or linked to the IP address typed into the browser (eg. Internet Explorer) address bar.<br /> <br /> The error is usually displayed because of either one of the following reasons:<br /> <br /> 1) The web page does not exist or the website does not work. In this case the web page requested will return error 404 from any computer. Test using at list two different computers and two different network connections.<br /> <br /> <ol> <li>This usually translates in one of the following:</li> <li>You wrote the URL in the wrong way.</li> <li>The web page requested does not exist.</li> <li>The web server hosting the website is down.</li> <li>The domain name is not linked to the website anymore (setting problems or subscription expired)</li></ol> <br /> 2) Your computer's DNS or network settings are wrong.In this case the web page requested will return error 404 from this computer. The same page will be displayed using a different computer or network. One example of this situation is when some malaware disables access to Websites like Microsoft by changing DNS service. If this is the case the same page will be displayed using other computers, but you will get error 404 with this particular computer.<br /> <br /> If this is the case, ensure that you have installed an efficient and updated antivirus. Run a virus scan.<br /> If that is not enough to fix the problem, try the following reset:<br /> <br /> 1- Click Start &gt;&gt; Run &gt;&gt; regsvr32 /i browseui.dll&gt;&gt; enter<br /> <br /> A dialog box with a confirmation message will be displayed. Click OK.<br /> <br /> 2- Click Start &gt;&gt; Run &gt;&gt; regsvr32 /i shell32.dll<br /> <br /> Wait for the dialog box, then click OK.<br /> <br /> Regards.<br /> <br /> Ginko.<br /> <br /> <br />

on Jan 07, 2011 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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Install WAMP on Windows Vista


If you recently upgraded to Microsoft Vista, you can enhance the functionality of Vista by turning it into a server. Among many other possibilities, running Vista as a server will let you host web pages, share your documents with friends and family, and allow you to access your documents from outside your local area network. This tutorial will demonstrate how to turn Windows Vista (any version) into a Web server, and how to enable port forwarding on your router which will allow you to connect to your server from outside your local area network. This tutorial requires Windows Vista, 512MB RAM, and 64.6MB of free space on your hard drive



You can install Apache Server, MySQL, and PHP in one step using WAMP. WAMP is a freeware package that bundles Apache, MySQL, and PHP into one executable. You can download WAMP from the project homepage. Once you download WAMP, double click the icon and begin the install process.
Click Next to begin: After agreeing to the WAMP license, select the destination location. Leave the default location as "c:'wamp" and click Next: Leave the default Start Menu shortcut as "WampServer" and click Next: Select automatically launch WAMP5 on startup. This will allow Vista to act as a server whenever it is started. Select the check box and click Next: WAMP will summarize your selections. Click Install and WAMP will begin the install process: WAMP will extract and install itself. The process should only take a few seconds, and WAMP will prompt you to choose a folder for your "DocumentRoot." Leave the default folder as "www" and click Ok: WAMP will prompt you to enter the SMTP server to be used by PHP to send emails. Leave the default value as "localhost" and click Next: WAMP will then prompt you to enter the default email address to be used by PHP to send emails. Put your email address in this field and click Next: If you have Firefox installed, WAMP will ask you if you would like to use Firefox as the default browser with WAMP. This is a personal preference, so feel free to choose "Yes" or "No." I will choose "Yes" and then click Next: You will likely be prompted by Vista whether the Windows Firewall should allow or block the features of WAMP. You want to allow all of the features of WAMP, so click Unblock: Congratulations, the installation process is complete, click Finish and Launch WAMP5 now: Open a browser and enter "localhost" as the URL, and you will see a summary of the installation process: There are a few more changes you must make to really leverage the power of WAMP. The first is to open a port on your router and allow it to forward requests to WAMP. This will allow you to connect to your WAMP server from outside your local area network. You will need to learn what your local area network address is before opening a port on the router. In order to do this, open Command Prompt by going to Start >> All Programs >> Accessories >> Command Prompt. Once in Command Prompt, type ipconfig/all. This command will give quite a bit of information, but you are only interested in the IPv4 address: Your address will probably be different than my address. Write this address down and close the Command Prompt. You are at the point where you can open a port on our router and forward requests to WAMP. The firmware for most routers is different, so the directions I give to open a port may be slightly different on your router. Connect to your router through your browser of choice. If you have a Linksys router enter http://192.168.1.1 into the URL bar. If you have a NETGEAR router enter http://192.168.0.1. If you have another brand of router please consult your documentation to find out how to access your firmware through a browser. Once you are in your router's control panel, you will have a location called something similar to "Port Range Forwarding." You will want to create a new entry and call the application WAMP. Enter 80 for Start and End, choose Both for Protocol and enter your IPv4 address (my address is shown above as 192.168.1.116) you obtained form the Command Prompt as the IP Address. Choose Enable and click Save Settings: You need to edit one more file before you will be able to access your documents from outside your local area network. Click the WAMP icon that has been added to the system tray, choose "Config files," and select "httpd.conf": This will open httpd.conf in Notepad. You will need to edit the section called "Controls who can get stuff from this server." Scroll down to this section (it's a little less than half way through the file) and change the line that says "Deny from all" to "Allow from all" and resave the document: Click the WAMP icon in the system tray and restart Apache: Open a browser and navigate to "http://www.whatismyip.com" and find out what your IP address is. Now open a browser and enter "http://yourIPaddress" and you will be forwarded to your WAMP server whether you are inside or outside your local area network. Anything you put into your "c:'wamp'www" directory will be stored on your server. For example, if you copied all your pictures to "c:'wamp'www'pictures," you will be able to navigate to "http://yourIPaddress/pictures" and all of your pictures will be available.

on Apr 25, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

?500 Internal Server Error? 100% 2003 Gateway 700S PC 2002 Windows XP Home Edition Late 8/20 or early 8/21 ?Guru? recommended I change my web browser from Internet Explorer to Foxfire Foxfire...


hi Fixing 500 errors - general
This error can only be resolved by fixes to the Web server software. It is not a client-side problem. It is up to the operators of the Web server site to locate and analyse the logs which should give further information about the error. Fixing 500 errors - CheckUpDown Please contact us (email preferred) whenever you encounter 500 errors on your CheckUpDown account. We then have to liaise with your ISP and the vendor of the Web server software so they can trace the exact reason for the error. Correcting the error may require recoding program logic for the Web server software, which could take some time. try sending email of your problems to support.microsoft.com.hope this helps sorry it sounds so complicated.

Aug 23, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cookie: VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE=I6ULXOL2hYU; __utma=27069237.3582438350991212000.1239168012.1245777657.1245801341.248; __utmz=27069237.1245220189.213.2.utmcsr=xat.com|utmccn=(referral)


In computing, a cookie (also tracking cookie, browser cookie, and HTTP cookie) is a small piece of text stored on a user's computer by a web browser. A cookie consists of one or more name-value pairs containing bits of information such as user preferences, shopping cart contents, the identifier for a server-based session, or other data used by websites.
It is sent as an HTTP header by a web server to a web browser and then sent back unchanged by the browser each time it accesses that server. A cookie can be used for authenticating, session tracking (state maintenance), and remembering specific information about users, such as site preferences or the contents of their electronic shopping carts. The term "cookie" is derived from "magic cookie", a well-known concept in UNIX computing which inspired both the idea and the name of browser cookies. Some alternatives to cookies exist; each has its own uses, advantages, and drawbacks.
Being simple pieces of text, cookies are not executable. They are neither spyware or viruses, although cookies from certain sites are detected by many anti-spyware products because they can allow users to be tracked when they visit various sites.
Most modern browsers allow users to decide whether to accept cookies, and the time frame to keep them, but rejecting cookies makes some websites unusable. For example, shopping carts or login systems implemented using cookies do not work if cookies are disabled.


Souce: WIKI

I hope this information helps you

Jon

Jun 24, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

Tip

Registry Hacks


Menu Speed

When XP first appeared, there was a lot of conversation about the new interface, both good andad. In spite of the initial complaints, most users stick with the default settings rather than reverting to the Classic interface found in previous Windows versions. But you may want to change the delay you notice when you click on the Start Menu. I see no reason for there to be any delay when I click on the Start Menu. Effects are pretty, but I wouldn't click on it if I didn't have business inside, so let's get it open and get moving. The default speed can be adjusted with a quick Registry hack.
Go to the Registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop\MenuShowDelay. The default value is 400. Set it to 0 to remove the delay completely, but if you do that it will be nearly impossible to move the mouse fast enough not to activate All Programs if you mouse over it en route to your final selection. Pick a number that suits your style, make the change, then test it until you find a good compromise between speed and usability.
Place Windows Kernel into RAM
It's a given that anything that runs in RAM will be faster than an item that has to access the hard drive and virtual memory. Rather than have the kernel that is the foundation of XP using the slower Paging Executive functions, use this hack to create and set the DisablePagingExecutive DWORD to a value of 1.
Edit the Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\ Session Manager\Memory Management\DisablePagingExecutive to 1 to disable paging and have the kernel run in RAM (set the value to 0 to undo this hack). Exit the Registry and reboot. Perform this hack only if the system has 256 MB or more of installed RAM!
Disable 8.3 Name Creation in NTFS
Files that use the 8.3 naming convention can degrade NTFS drive performance. Unless you have a good reason for keeping the 8.3 naming convention intact (such as if you're using 16-bit programs), a performance gain can be achieved by disabling it:
Set the Registry DWORD key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\ FileSystem\NtfsDisable8dot3NameCreation to 1. Exit the Registry and reboot.

Whenever you surf the Web, you leave yourself open to being snooped upon by web sites. They can track your online travels, know what operating system and browser you're running, find out your machine name, peer into your clipboard, uncover the last sites you've visited, examine your history list, delve into your cache, examine your IP address and use that to learn basic information about you such as your geographic location, and more. To a great extent, your Internet life is an open book when you visit.
Don't believe me? Head to http://www.anonymizer.com/snoop/test_ip.shtml. This page, run by the Anonymizer.com web service, tells you what your IP address and machine name are. And that's just a start. Click on the links on the left side, such as "Exposed Clipboard" and "Geographical Location." You'll see just a small sampling of what web sites can learn about you.
Much of the reason why web sites can find out this information about you is due to the trusting nature of the Internet's infrastructure and is inherent in the open client/server relationship between your web browser and the servers on the sites you visit. But a lot of it also has to do with the ability to match up information from your PC to information in publicly available databases—for example, databases that have information about IP addresses.
The best way to make sure web sites can't gather personal information about you and your computer is to surf anonymously; use an anonymous proxy server to sit between you and the web sites you visit. When you use an anonymous proxy server, your browser doesn't contact a web site directly. Instead, it tells a proxy server which web site you want to visit. The proxy server then contacts the web site, and when you get the web site's page you don't get it directly from the site. Instead, it's delivered to you by the proxy server. In that way, your browser never directly contacts the web server whose site you want to view. The web site sees the IP address of the proxy server, not your PC's IP address. It can't read your cookies, see your history list, or examine your clipboard and cache, because your PC is never in direct contact with it. You're able to surf anonymously, without a trace.
There are two primary ways to use anonymous proxy servers. You can run client software on your PC, which does the work of contacting the server for you, or you can instead visit a web site, which then does the work of contacting the server.

on Mar 20, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

LINUX SQUID SERVER IN TRANSPARENT MODE


Dear Friend....
The examples below are based on the discussion of Linux iptables in Chapter 14, "Linux Firewalls Using iptables". Additional commands may be necessary for you particular network topology.
In both cases below, the firewall is connected to the Internet on interface eth0 and to the home network on interface eth1. The firewall is also the default gateway for the home network and handles network address translation on all the network's traffic to the Internet.
Only the Squid server has access to the Internet on port 80 (HTTP), because all HTTP traffic, except that coming from the Squid server, is redirected.
If the Squid server and firewall are the same server, all HTTP traffic from the home network is redirected to the firewall itself on the Squid port of 3128 and then only the firewall itself is allowed to access the Internet on port 80.
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth1 -p tcp --dport 80 \
-j REDIRECT --to-port 3128
iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -m state \
--state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -i eth1 -p tcp \
--dport 3128
iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -m state \
--state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -o eth0 -p tcp \
--dport 80
iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -m state \
--state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -i eth0 -p tcp \
--sport 80
iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -m state \
--state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -o eth1 -p tcp \
--sport 80
Note: This example is specific to HTTP traffic. You won't be able to adapt this example to support HTTPS web browsing on TCP port 443, as that protocol specifically doesn't allow the insertion of a "man in the middle" server for security purposes. One solution is to add IP masquerading statements for port 443, or any other important traffic, immediately after the code snippet. This will allow non HTTP traffic to access the Internet without being cached by Squid.
If the Squid server and firewall are different servers, the statements are different. You need to set up iptables so that all connections to the Web, not originating from the Squid server, are actually converted into three connections; one from the Web browser client to the firewall and another from the firewall to the Squid server, which triggers the Squid server to make its own connection to the Web to service the request. The Squid server then gets the data and replies to the firewall which then relays this information to the Web browser client. The iptables program does all this using these NAT statements:
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth1 -s ! 192.168.1.100 \
-p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to 192.168.1.100:3128
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth1 -s 192.168.1.0/24 \
-d 192.168.1.100 -j SNAT --to 192.168.1.1
iptables -A FORWARD -s 192.168.1.0/24 -d 192.168.1.100 \
-i eth1 -o eth1 -m state
--state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-p tcp --dport 3128 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -d 192.168.1.0/24 -s 192.168.1.100 \
-i eth1 -o eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-p tcp --sport 3128 -j ACCEPT
In the first statement all HTTP traffic from the home network except from the Squid server at IP address 192.168.1.100 is redirected to the Squid server on port 3128 using destination NAT. The second statement makes this redirected traffic also undergo source NAT to make it appear as if it is coming from the firewall itself. The FORWARD statements are used to ensure the traffic is allowed to flow to the Squid server after the NAT process is complete. The unusual feature is that the NAT all takes place on one interface; that of the home network (eth1).
You will additionally have to make sure your firewall has rules to allow your Squid server to access the Internet on HTTP TCP port 80 as covered in Chapter 14, "Linux Firewalls Using iptables".

Good Luck!

Jun 22, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cannot get secondary email to work.


That's not much info to work with. To set up an email account you need to know a few things, like what kind of mail server is used and if you have to be on their network for it to work. If you have POP accounts, you need to be on their network (your cable provider, as an example) and then you need to know:
receive server name
send server name
your username
your password
and then just follow the wizard to input this info appropriately.
If you do need to be on their network and you aren't, you are stuck using web mail in a browser, IF they provide it.

Apr 20, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Can't connect to internet when K9 program installed


Symptom You are unable to access any website
Causes
  • Your firewall is blocking K9
  • You are connected behind a proxy server
Solution If you receive an error that states "K9 Web Protection Not Responding," please click here. Otherwise, continue below.
You may be unable to access the Internet using K9 in a couple cases:
Case 1: Your firewall is blocking K9
If you are using a desktop firewall, it may appear that you cannot access the Internet. To resolve this issue, you will need to configure your firewall to "always allow" the following program to access the internet:
C:\Program Files\Blue Coat K9 Web Protection\k9filter.exe
Please consult your desktop firewall documentation for instructions on how to do this. Note that the location of this file will be different if you chose to install K9 in a different location.
Case 2: You are connected behind a proxy server
If you are REQUIRED to use a proxy server to access the Internet, you will be unable to use K9 Web Protection at this time. Examples of environments where proxy servers are common include schools, businesses, libraries, and hotels -- potentially any environment where one internet connection is shared over a large network. We hope to offer proxy compatibility in a future version of K9.

http://www.nohold.net/noHoldCust31/Prod_16/KnowledgePortal/KPScripts/amsviewer.asp?docid=52ca48eb01be41e0ac7f48e72a123b85_unable_to_access_internet.xml&amsstatsid=65361

You may have to copy and paste the link into your browser.
If I could be of further assistance, let me know. If this helps or solves the issue, please rate it.
Thanks, Joe

Oct 27, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2 Answers

Cache memory


A cache is a temporary storage area where frequently accessed data can be stored for rapid access. Once the data is stored in the cache, future use can be made by accessing the cached copy rather than re-fetching or recomputing the original data, so that the average access time is shorter. Cache, therefore, helps expedite data access that the CPU would otherwise need to fetch from main memory.

A cache is a block of memory for temporary storage of data likely to be used again. The CPU and hard drive frequently use a cache, as do web browsers and web servers.

A cache is made up of a pool of entries. Each entry has a datum (a nugget of data) which is a copy of the datum in some backing store. Each entry also has a tag, which specifies the identity of the datum in the backing store of which the entry is a copy.

When the cache client (a CPU, web browser, operating system) wishes to access a datum presumably in the backing store, it first checks the cache. If an entry can be found with a tag matching that of the desired datum, the datum in the entry is used instead. This situation is known as a cache hit. So, for example, a web browser program might check its local cache on disk to see if it has a local copy of the contents of a web page at a particular URL. In this example, the URL is the tag, and the contents of the web page is the datum. The percentage of accesses that result in cache hits is known as the hit rate or hit ratio of the cache.

The advantage of cache memory is that the CPU does not have to use the motherboard’s system bus for data transfer. Whenever data must be passed through the system bus, the data transfer speed slows to the motherboard’s capability. The CPU can process data much faster by avoiding the bottleneck created by the system bus

Jul 17, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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