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My family are big ice cube fans and I wanted to buy some molds that were a bit different from the regular shapes. Any ideas?

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Actually you could go crazy. There are so many different ice cube trays out there, themes, shapes - you name it, they have an ice cube mold for it. Just check out amazon's range for some ideas.

Or take a look at this link, it's an article about unusual ice cube trays, personally I just love the snowflake ones;

http://www.toxel.com/tech/2009/03/24/20-unusual-and-creative-ice-cube-trays/

Posted on Jan 10, 2013

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I heard that you can make ice cubes in different flavors? Anyone have any ideas for me?


Making flavored ice cubes is a funky way of brightening up your drink. Take a look at the Martha Stewart site. They suggest some brilliant combinations such as basil and cucumber - it's the kind of stuff that probably tastes brilliant but you would never think of it yourself;

http://www.marthastewart.com/356419/flavored-ice-cube-ideas/@center/276964/60-days-summer

Feb 18, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

What are flavored ice cubes?


Flavored ice cubes are a great way of jazzing up a drink and cooling it down without watering down the flavor in the way that regular ice cubes would. You can make fruit cubes or vanilla cubes and really add another dimension to your drinks.

Feb 18, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

Any idea how to freeze your own ice blocks for decorations and maybe even to color them?


Actually it's not that hard but it takes time to experiment to see which way works best for you. Some people boil the water before they start to freeze it in shapes - others say don't bother.

You can take a look at this guy's website - he has got some amazing colors;

http://www.alcademics.com/2010/08/a-homemade-giant-crystal-clear-ice-cube-tray.html

Feb 18, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

Can you use jell-o molds for making ice shapes?


Yes it's a great idea. If you want to get creative and make fancy shapes of ice, you can use candy, jell-o or even cake molds. The silicone ones are even easier to tip out.

Feb 18, 2013 | Home

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There seem to be so many different types of ice cube trays: silicone, plastic, metal etc. What is the best type to buy?


It sometimes is just a matter of taste. The silicone ice cube molds are more flexible and often take up less freezer space but some people don't enjoy the struggle of getting them out of the molds.

Read this article that reviews ice cube trays and gives an opionion on the best ones. For me - I still love the old fashioned plastic trays that don't flop around when you are trying to put them in the freezer;

http://gizmodo.com/5913538/the-best-ice-cube-tray-of-all-time

Jan 10, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

Fridge freezer, water inlet pipe keeps warming up


The home icemaker's predecessor was the plastic ice tray. It's fairly obvious how this device works: You pour water into a mold, leave it in the freezer until it turns to a solid and then extract the ice cubes. An icemaker does exactly the same thing, but the process of pouring water and extracting cubes is fully automated. A home icemaker is an ice-cube assembly line.

Most icemakers use an electric motor, an electrically operated water valve and an electrical heating unit. To provide power to all these elements, you have to hook the icemaker up to the electrical circuit powering your refigerator. You also have to hook the icemaker up to the plumbing line in your house, to provide fresh water for the ice cubes. The power line and the water-intake tube both run through a hole in the back of the freezer.

When everything is hooked up, the icemaker begins its cycle. The cycle is usually controlled by a simple electrical circuit and a series of switches.

At the beginning of the cycle, a timed switch in the circuit briefly sends current to a solenoid water valve. In most designs, the water valve is actually positioned behind the refrigerator, but it is connected to the central circuit via electrical wires. When the circuit sends current down these wires, the charge moves a solenoid (a type of electromagnet), which opens the valve.

The valve is only open for about seven seconds; it lets in just enough water to fill the ice mold. The ice mold is a plastic well, with several connected cavities. Typically, these cavities have a curved, half-circle shape. Each of the cavity walls has a small notch in it so each ice cube will be attached to the cube next to it.

Once the mold is filled, the machine waits for the water in the mold to freeze. The cooling unit in the refrigerator does the actual work of freezing the water, not the icemaker itself. The icemaker has a built-in thermostat, which monitors the temperature level of the water in the molds. When the temperature dips to a particular level -- say, 9 degrees Fahrenheit (-13 degrees Celsius) -- the thermostat closes a switch in the electrical circuit.

Closing this switch lets electrical current flow through a heating coil underneath the icemaker. As the coil heats up, it warms the bottom of the ice mold, loosening the ice cubes from the mold surface.

The electrical circuit then activates the icemaker's motor. The motor spins a gear, which rotates another gear attached to a long plastic shaft. The shaft has a series of ejector blades extending out from it. As the blades revolve, they scoop the ice cubes up and out of the mold, pushing them to the front of the icemaker. Since the cubes are connected to one another, they move as a single unit.

At the front of the icemaker, there are plastic notches in the housing that match up with the ejector blades. The blades pass through these notches, and the cubes are pushed out to a collection bin underneath the icemaker.

The revolving shaft has a notched plastic cam at its base. Just before the cubes are pushed out of the icemaker, the cam catches hold of the shut-off arm, lifting it up. After the cubes are ejected, the arm falls down again. When the arm reaches its lowest resting position, it throws a switch in the circuit, which activates the water valve to begin another cycle. If the arm can't reach its lowest position, because there are stacked-up ice cubes in the way, the cycle is interrupted. This keeps the icemaker from filling your entire freezer with ice; it will only make more cubes when there is room in the collection bin.

This system is effective for making ice at home, but it doesn't produce enough ice for commercial purposes, such as restaurants and self-service hotel ice machines. In the next section, we'll look at a larger, more powerful icemaker design.

There are any number of ways to configure a large, free-standing icemaker -- all you need is a refrigeration system, a water supply and some way of collecting the ice that forms.

One of the simplest professional systems uses a large metal ice-cube tray, positioned vertically.

In this system, the metal ice tray is connected to a set of coiled heat-exchanging pipes like the ones on the back of your refrigerator. A compressor drives a stream of refrigerant fluid in a continuous cycle of condensation and expansion. Basically, the compressor forces refrigerant through a narrow tube (called the condenser) to condense it, and then releases it into a wider tube (called the evaporator), where it can expand.

Compressing the refrigerant raises its pressure, which increases its temperature. As the refrigerant passes through the narrow condenser coils, it loses heat to the cooler air outside, and it condenses into a liquid. When the compressed fluid passes through the expansion valve, it evaporates -- it expands to become a gas. This evaporation process draws in heat energy from the metal pipes and the air around the refrigerant. This cools the pipes and the attached metal ice tray.

The icemaker has a water pump, which draws water from a collection sump and pours it over the chilled ice tray. As the water flows over the tray, it gradually freezes, building up ice cubes in the well of the tray. When you freeze water layer by layer this way, it forms clear ice. When you freeze it all at once, as in the home icemaker, you get cloudy ice.

After a set amount of time, the icemaker triggers a solenoid valve connected to the heat-exchanging coils. Switching this valve changes the path of the refrigerant. The compressor stops forcing the heated gas from the compressor into the narrow condenser; instead, it forces the gas into a wide bypass tube. The hot gas is cycled back to the evaporator without condensing. When you force this hot gas through the evaporator pipes, the pipes and the ice tray heat up rapidly, which loosens the ice cubes.

Typically, the individual cube cavities are slanted so the loosened ice will slide out on their own, into a collection bin below. Some systems have a cylinder piston that gives the tray a little shove, knocking the cubes loose.

This sort of system is popular in restaurants and hotels because it makes ice cubes with a standard shape and size. Other businesses, such as grocery stores and scientific research firms, need smaller ice flakes for packing perishable items. We'll look at flake icemakers next.

In the last section, we looked at a standard cube icemaker design. Flake icemakers work on the same basic principle as cube icemakers, but they have an additional component: the ice crusher. You can see how a typical flake system works in the diagram below.

Like the cube icemaker design we examined in the last section, this machine uses a set of heat-exchanging coils and a stream of water to build up a layer of ice. But in this system, the coils are positioned inside a large metal cylinder. Water passes through the cylinder, as well as around its outer edges. The passing water gradually builds up a large column of ice surrounding the cylinder from the inside and outside.

As with a cube icemaker, a solenoid valve releases hot gas into the cooling pipes after a set length of time. This loosens the ice column so it falls into the ice crusher below. The ice crusher breaks the ice cylinder into small pieces, which pass on to a collection bin.

The size of the ice bits depends on the crusher mechanism. Some crushers grind the ice into fine flakes, while other crushers produce larger, irregularly shaped ice chunks.

There are many variations on these designs, but the basic idea in all of them is the same. A refrigeration system builds up a layer of ice, and a harvesting system ejects the ice into a collection bin. At the most basic level, this is all there is to any icemaker.


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1 Answer

Ice maker won't make ice after changing water filter


Have you tried adding a bit of water to the ice mold? Is their an ice cube stuck in the ice mold? If you have an ice cube stuck in there just heat the im with a hair dryer till the cube clears and fingers go around. Listen to see if you hear water going into the mold.

Oct 08, 2010 | Kenmore Elite 22.4 cu. ft. Bottom Freezer...

1 Answer

ICE WITHOUT PLUMBING


it really doesnt matter how full you fill the bucket. round cubes will probably dispense just fine if you have access to that shape ice. 
One additional thing, be sure to turn the icemaker off to prevent the fill valve from going bad and to keep it from making a loud buzz about every 10 minutes. thx peyton

Jan 25, 2009 | Freezers

2 Answers

Ice cube shape


hoshizakis make ice cubes depending on the amount of water in the sump. if you are starving for water the sump only partially fills in the fill time allowed . then it makes ice until the water is used up and the float switch drops and the cubes are little slices. you can adjust the size of cubes you want by raising or lowering the float assembley in the sump. if its to low the water rises and the float rises and tells the machine you happy with little slices. if you raise it up to max height you can max fill before float satisfies and max ice cubes. But if you are starving for water the time to fill will run out before the sump fills and cubes will be small no matter where you set the floats assembly. water starving can be due to crud in the water line, to small a water line, most hoshizes take a half inch line ,or a clogged water filter. if you suspect a filter take it out . if fill is drastically improved you need a new filter. be aware that starving for water on a hoshizaki will eventually lead to broken evap plates. big time expensive.good luck. i put in a new machine ruined by starving water and the new one made little chips of ice real quick. i finally pulled the filter out and voila! big cubes and great production.

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1 Answer

Ice maker will not push out ice cubes once frozer


That means that the evaporator fan system that releases the the ice cubes is not working as it should.

The heater, or evaporator fan and heating system must be checked, and fan, or solenoid, or element must be replaced.

Use the number listed on the owner manual if you want to call a technician.

Enter model number on this website to find schematics and replacement parts.

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