Question about Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

I have a dobsonion 306 mm reflecting telescope it is perfectly collimated but whenI observe a planet (currently Jupiter)I am getting mutiple images on both sides of the main image. The mirror is 15 mm thick and has a good clear surface. Has anyone got an explanation please? Bill Tauranga

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 3,961 Answers

If you are satisfied it is well collimated, then:


- did you use a laser collimator? If so is THAT collimated? Lots of them are not.
- check all the adapter rings, diagonals, barlows etc that you might have are all properly seated
- then, I'd say your main mirror securing clips are done up too tight and are distorting the mirror. They should only just touch lightly.

Posted on Jan 13, 2013

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
  • 921 Answers

SOURCE: Problem with image

Stars are blurry period thats just the way they are. and with the worlds atmosphere (air) you'll always get a slight waviness...even when viewing planets.

Posted on Sep 15, 2009

SOURCE: How do I get the image to turn the right side up?

Dopn't worry about upside down. All astronomical telescopes show images upside down. There is no up or down in space.

You may have what is called an "erecting" prism diagonal that turns the image right side up. Just Google "erecting prism diagonal".

This may also help you.
http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=810

Posted on Dec 27, 2009

SOURCE: Is there supposed to be a reflecting mirror on the

The mirror is BEHIND the metal "spider" pointed toward the main mirror in the bottom.

Watch this video:
http://www.andysshotglass.com/Collimating.html

Posted on Nov 05, 2010

SOURCE: Looking through the telescope, the

All astronomical telescopes show upside down images-- it's normal. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. DO NOT USE the 2x barlow if you have one.

Read my TIPS on my profile page.

Posted on Dec 26, 2010

LongPockets
  • 1177 Answers

SOURCE: We were given an EDU

The bit you are missing is the finder scope, which is a small low-power scope that is used to line up the main scope on an object that you want to view. Without this it can be quite hard to get the scope pointed at anything, as the field of view is quite limited, and more so at higher powers.

It can be quite expensive to buy useful eyepieces for a scope, but they are readily available if the eyepiece mount tube is 1.25 inch inside diameter. The eyepieces that originally came with this scope probably were not very good, and in fact this scope is not up to much. It is rather small for a reflector at three inches diameter. You certainly won't be able to use it at the advertised 600 power, or even at 200. It has neither the resolution nor the light gathering ability with that small an aperture.

I would recommend that you explore the web page at THIS LINK for a lot of good advice about first telescopes, before you spend any money.

Posted on Jan 05, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a T1000HD telescope . I was wondering what I need to do to be able to see planets such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn's rings. Is it just a matter of getting different eyepieces? If so what kind?


That scope came with a 25 mm and a 10 mm eyepiece, which will give about a x40 and a x100 magnification respectively. If the seeing is good (clear sky, not dusty or windy, and the planet not too low (at least 30 deg up from the horizon) you should get a reasonable view of the planets, with these ep's

If you do not have any ep's you could buy 2 or 3 plossl type ep's (nothing more expensive is justified) of say 10 mm, 25 mm, and 32 mm. It looks like it takes ep's with a 1.25" barrel.

The theoretical limiting power of your scope is about x 220, which is about a 4 mm eyepiece, but at that extreme you will find the viewing object is dim, fuzzy, hard to get into the field of view, hard to focus, and totally frustrating.

Sadly this scope is just not a very good one, sorry to sound elitist. One of the issues will be that of collimation (optical alignment). You can never properly focus the scope unless it is collimated. Reflector scopes (with a mirror) all have this difficulty. You can tell if it is collimated with a star test

http://garyseronik.com/no-tools-telescope-collimation/

There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the scope, where the mirror is. These are the collimation screws. Have somebody screw these in and out while you look through the ep. Remember you can only assess the collimation when the defocussed star image is right in the middle of your view.
.

Dec 12, 2016 | Optics

1 Answer

How far is jupiter from the sun


483.8 million miles on average. (Jupiter like most planets has an elliptical as opposed to circular orbit.)

Feb 26, 2015 | Meade Jupiter 60AZ-MF Telescope with Bonus...

1 Answer

I use a celestron astromaster 130 eq. When I focus on an object such as a planet at night, the silhouette of the secondary mirror and its mounts overlays the image of the planet. I do not experience this...


You need to collimate your telescope. This site has a really easy to understand diagram and instructions. Hope this helps. http://www.astro-baby.com/collimation/astro%20babys%20collimation%20guide.htm Good luck. Astronomyforums.net and cloudynights.com are two really good sites for information.

Sep 03, 2012 | Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Cant see image through main telescope


If your telescope is a reflecting telescope then the problem might be with the mirror alignment - the process is called collimation. There is an entire process on how to do this (Google Collimation Reflecting Telescope).
If you scope is a refractor then maybe you forgot to remove the lens cap. Check it out. Sometimes it is as simple as that.
Without further information and pictures, we cannot help too much.
walt

Apr 20, 2012 | Citiwell International Orbitor 5500...

1 Answer

Am I supposed to see the cross in the centre of image on celestron 76eq


You will see diffrection spikes when focused on a very bright object

http://www.goldastro.com/images/newtonian.jpg

and this can also appear around a bright planet. However it is very irritating, and to minimise it, make sure your scope is well collimated (optically aligned).

There is too much to collimation to include here, but there are many guides on the Net

http://www.cloudynights.com/documents/primer.pdf

http://www.atmsite.org/contrib/Carlin/collimation/

Feb 22, 2012 | Celestron FirstScope 76EQ (180 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

I can't get my Meade 10" Lightbridge telescope to focus in the eyepiece. I bought a Meade Laser Collimator and Collimated it last night outside before I tried to observe Jupiter and it still didn't...


Even if the scope is a little out of collimation it should still focus. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. DO NOT use a 2x barlow if you have one.

Try again--- you can do this during the day time on a distant object and practice turning the focus knob slowly left and or right until you get a sharp image.

The higher the magnification the smaller the "sweet spot" with the focuser.

Jan 13, 2011 | Meade LightBridge 10 in. Standard (600 x...

1 Answer

I am thinking of buying a Tasco Telescope Model 46-11437 second-hand and am wondering what the original purchase price may have been and what problems I should know about before I buy.


Originally around $150 new. This is a wide field, low power scope. Good for the moon fair to good for planets and fair for deep sky objects (Orion Nebula and some clusters will be fine) Expect to see Jupiter and its moons but unless it is a perfect night, no detail of Jupiter's clouds. Should see the rings of Saturn also.
The scope comes with Tasco eyepieces, which are close to junk but at least they are in 1.25 in format. You can buy better eyepieces and they will work with any upgraded scopes, if you catch the astronomy bug.
The optics are fair, Tasco is not known for good optics. I would study up on collimating your scope, I guarantee you will have to adjust it.

Nov 15, 2010 | Tasco Galaxsee 46114375 (375 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

The images of deep sky objects (such as M31 M8 ...) I get with my LXD75 (SN 8") are faint. The images of the solar system (Moon, Jupiter...) are decent. Should I proceed to a collimation ?


NO- the objects are much dimmer than the planets and your camera must take a LONGER exposure to get an image.

Collimation makes stars and planets "sharper" but NOT BRIGHTER.

Many deep sky objects require 10-15 minute exposures!

Aug 08, 2010 | Meade LXD75 8.0"/203mm f/4.0 Telescope OTA...

1 Answer

What level magnification do I use to see jupiter or saturn in a telescope?


Your 3.5 inch telescope has a maximum magnification of about 170 power.

This is under perfect sky conditions and a perfectly collimated telescope. Galileo used 30 power magnification to see Saturn's rings and the moons of Jupiter!

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser do not use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Point it at Saturn. You will see the rings. However they are almost slanted directly toward Earth right now. You will only see a thin line going across the planet.

By the end of 2010 they should open up again enough to make out the "ring" shape.

You only need about 50-70 power to view Jupiter or Saturn, or Venus. Mars is smaller and about 100 power to 120 power should permit you to see the disk of the planet (but it's still very small in the eyepiece).

Dec 29, 2009 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Unable to focus with magnification greater than 40x


You must collimate the scope. Watch this video.
http://www.andysshotglass.com/Collimating.html

Also the maximum magnification of any telescope is NEVER more than 50 times aperture, so your scope is 400 power. BUT everything including the sky must be perfect. Usually 30-40 times aperture is the most you will ever get.

Oct 20, 2009 | Orion Optics

Not finding what you are looking for?
Edu-Science (10166) Telescope Logo

Related Topics:

95 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Edu-Science Optics Experts

Joe Lalumia aka...
Joe Lalumia aka...

Level 3 Expert

3186 Answers

bobalix

Level 3 Expert

451 Answers

Ted Maxwell

Level 3 Expert

3519 Answers

Are you an Edu-Science Optic Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...