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No zoom function on a kalimar power zoom scope,

This is the binocular type. Zeika Opt. co. 50/100 zoom. number on the lens is 15806. Takes 4 AA batteries. Battery push button and check light indicates power.
when you push the zoom buttons there is no response. no clicking of motor response. zoom lens does not rotate.

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Larry389's so-called solution is not a solution... just an opinion to which each individual is entitled... even when not correct! I've used a Zeika Opt. Co. Power Zoom Binocular No.25361 for over 25 years since inheriting them from my father who purchased them in early 1970. To say the least, treated carefully and with respect for the delicate instrument that they are, they've been wonderful and still work perfectly fine. Perhaps Larry's experience is based upon handling them like junk and, therefore, reaping what he has sewn.

Posted on Apr 06, 2009

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I want to back up what Whrinnow said. I have a pair of working Zeika Power Zoom binoculars. I have noticed that inside the battery compartment the spring-loaded metal contact plates can develop a whitish crud that must be removed with a Q-tip and rubbing alcohol before the batteries will power the little motor.

Posted on Jan 06, 2010

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I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM WITH MY KALIMAR POWER ZOOM. I CLEANED THE BATTERY COMPARTMENT AND THEY WORK FINE NOW. HOPE THIS HELPS.

Posted on Jul 19, 2009

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Chances are they are bound up for good. everyone thinks zoom is good. it is not. you are better off with a standard good bino that you can hold steady in your hands. do not buy zoom again they are all junk..to many moving parts that will never be in alignment, made to be thrown away, so throw away

Posted on Jan 25, 2009

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