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My Cyberpower CPS 1200 EI LCD Inverter output voltage is176V and varies with load and there are some times charging problems.

Battery Fully charged and inverter terminated the charging by it self. I turned off main and checked inverter output directly from inverter AC out let and the reading was 176 Voltage while there was no load on inverter. However, LCD indicator on inverter screen was showing 220 V output. I connected the phase wire in inverter out put socket and turned on two 23 Watts bulbs and inverter showed 184V output voltage in another socket of the room. Gradually volts increased to 192V. When I tuned of the both bulbs (when there was no load on the inverter it once again shows 179 V in the same socket). Three 23 Watts bulbs load on inverter, reading in socket showed 195V. Four 23 watts bulbs load on inverter, reading in same socket increased to 198 V and then I turned on a 40 Watts tube light and volts increased to 205V. Four bulbs and two tube lights, voltage in socket 202V. Then turned every thing off, meaning there was no load on the inverter and reading in socket gradually reduced to 179V. I repeated these steps three times and readings were strange. However, voltage output of inverter seemed to fluctuate while increasing the load or decreasing it. When there is some load on inverter during power outage then output voltage is better as compared with the inverter running without any load. 3rd Step Two 23 watts bulbs load on inverter, reading in socket was 191V. Three 23 watts bulbs load on inverter, reading in socket was 195V. Four bulbs and one 40 watt tube light, reading in socket was 202V. Four bulbs and two 40 watts tube lights, reading in socket was 199V. Four bulbs load on inverter and when I turned off both tube lights reading in socket was 212V. Turned off all loads and reading from socket was once again 179V. Meanwhile, when main is restored the LCD indicator on inverter shows the voltage which precisely corresponds with the voltage readings in the socket, inverter LCD indicator shows 129V as well as regarding on socket shows 128 V or 127V. (12 V 200 AH) Lead acid battery's output remained 12.1 V throughout this time. Kindly guide me that what is the issue. one other thing is that my cyberpower inverter some times takes so long to charge the batteries.

Posted by Anonymous on

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KUN 26 D4D Hilux...something is draining the battery over 3 or 4 days...Alternater putting in 13.85v but battery goes flat over 4-5 days


13.85 volts is barely sufficient and would indicate an alternator fault if the reading was taken "off-load"..

An alternator is not designed to charge the battery and is incapable of doing so because the terminal voltage of the battery quickly rises to fool the voltage regulator into believing even a discharged battery is fully charged and will quickly reduce the charge rate to a trickle.

The alternator is therefore designed to keep a fully charged battery fully charged by supplying all the current for the vehicle equipment and the output rating is chosen for this purpose.

The voltage regulator should limit the off-load voltage to about 14.5 volts but that is only a small part of the alternator test. A professional would apply a load across the battery equal to the rated output while monitoring the voltage and current. Most healthy alternators exceed specifications.

For a sensible in-service test when an adjustable load isn't available, with a fully-charged battery it is sufficient to start the engine, leaving it to idle and switch on all the vehicle equipment. Fit a voltmeter to the battery and wait while the battery voltage is pulled down by the load - to around 12.5 volts. Raising the engine speed to 2500/3000 rpm should cause the voltmeter to suddenly rise.
13.85 would be just about acceptable "on-load" but in excess of 14.0 volts would be ideal.

Jul 10, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Chaging batter


The voltmeter test provides a general indicatorof battery condition. Check the voltage of the battery to verify that it is in a 100% fully charged condition. If the open circuit (disconnected) voltage reading is below 12.6V, charge the battery and then recheck the voltage after the battery has set for one to two hours. If the voltage reading is 12.8V or above, perform the load test described below.



The load test measures battery performance under full current load and is the best indicator of battery condition. Load testing a battery tat is not FULLY CHARGED i.e. at 12.8 VDC can permanently damage it. Fully charge it first and then let it stand for at least an hour before the load test is done. You also need a load tester. AND you should know how to perform a load test. Often the best way to load test a battery will be to take it to a battery shop and have it done there.



VOLTAGE (OCV) STATE OF CHARGE FOR AGM BATTERIES IS:

12.8 VDC = 100%

12.6 VDC = 75%

12.3 VDC = 50%

12.0 VDC = 25%

11.8 VDC = 0%



COLD CRANKING AMPERAGE (CCA) for an XLH battery is 270













19 AMP HOUR BATTERY =



BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE = 12.8 VDC = 100% Charge; Rate of Charge = N/A



BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE = 12.6 VDC = 75% Charge; Rate of Charge @ 3 AMP = 1.75 hours @ 6 AMP = 50 minutes @ 10 AMP = 30 minutes @ 20 AMP = 15 minutes



BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE = 12.3 VDC = 50% Charge; Rate of Charge @ 3 AMP = 3.5 hours @ 6 AMP = 1.75 hours @!10 AMP = 1 hour @ 20 AMP = 30 minutes



BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE = 12.0 VDC = 25% Charge; Rate of Charge @ 3 AMP = 5 hours @ 6 AMP = 2.5 hours @ 10 AMP = 1.5 hours @ 20 AMP = 45 minutes



BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE = 11.8 VDC = 0% Charge; Rate of Charge @ 3 AMP = 6 hours, 40 minutes @ 6 AMP = 3 hours, 20 minutes @ 10 AMP = 2 hours @ 20 AMP = 1 hour





The figures listed above assume that the battery is charging at room temperature. If warmer than room temperature, use a slightly shorter charging time. If colder, use a slightly longer charging time.



The use of constant current chargers to charge maintenance-free batteries is not recommended. Any overcharge

will cause dry-out and premature battery failure. If a constant current charger is the only type available, do not exceed the charge times listed above and do not continue charging the battery if it gets hot. When charging, never exceed 15 volts for more than 30 minutes.



If the battery gets hotter than 110 degrees F. (43 degrees C) during charging, discontinue charger and allow the battery to cool. Overheating may result in plate distortion, internal shorting, dry out and/or other damage.



COLD CRANKING AMPERAGE (CCA) for a 2001 XLH battery is 270

Apr 22, 2014 | Harley Davidson XL 1200 S Sportster Sport...

1 Answer

2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre not charging


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
VT1100 Charging Problem
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Apr 11, 2014 | 2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

I mistakenly connected energy source at the AC inverter output .Inverter is 5KVA cyberpower inverter.After correcting the connection, It cannot switch from DC to AC( fault signal is displayed on its...


John,

It's shorted out, either replace the part or buy a new one.

If you need UPS, Surge, or Power Related help don't hesitate to contact me!
Daniel • daniel@psihq.com • Power & Systems Innovations • 800.260.2259 • www.psihq.com

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1 Answer

1985 gl1200 overcharging at idle will climb to16 volts, new battery


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
85 ltd Goldwing is charging at 16 volts
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Apr 14, 2013 | 1985 Honda GL 1200 Ltd. Ed. - SE-i Gold...

1 Answer

2000 Yamaha V-Max charging system


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Vmax Charging System TroubleShooting Guide
Charging voltage VMaxForum net http://www.vmaxoutlaw.com/tech/VMX12-Service-Manual.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA VMX12 Owner Manual

Aug 18, 2012 | 2000 Yamaha V-Max

1 Answer

1986 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing not charging


Hi, Arthur before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
86 GL1200 Asp SEi not charging GL1200 Information Questions goldwingdocs...
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Jun 04, 2012 | 1986 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

1984 Honda Goldwing Gl 1200 not charging


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
84 GL1200 won charge battery
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Feb 05, 2012 | 1984 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

1985 Honda Aspencade GL1200, Charging System not working properly battery constantly drains


Hi, L_selmon before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
battery drain minimum GL1200 Information Questions goldwingdocs com
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Feb 15, 2011 | 1985 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

Dir,sir my name is elsayed khatab working in power station my work depend on ups model ''400-cyberexwave'' but i have a problem when loading ups by select position bypass ,when i loading rectifier from...


I asked some clarification questions, but received no answer.

Because I see that your question is still standing, I will try to help you, but I am not sure, because I did not have your answers.

Your inverter I think is not CyberPower, but Thomas & Betts.
Your UPS has internal battery, which depends upon the type of the UPS.

If your battery is 270 V DC (which means 20 x 12 V batteries) 135 V will not be enough to charge them. But if you have 135 V DC (which means 10 x 12 V batteries) you can not give to them 270 V, because you can spoil them.

That's why you should measure the voltage on the batteries, not at the rectifier.
  1. If the batteries have the correct voltage for their number 135 for 10 batteries you can not adjust it to 270, you should adjust 135.
  2. If it is 270 for 20 batt's your rectifier did not get your order.
  3. If it is lower then the number of batteries multiplied by 11 V you may have a bad battery or completely discharged batteries and you need to charge them outside the UPS by other charger (One by one or in series) until their rated voltage is reached.
  4. Some of your internal breakers may not function well.

Jul 18, 2010 | CyberPower Dc/ac Inverter 400W

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