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How do I know that my hard disk has bad sectors?

I am not sure if its a boot sector virus or just an old hard disk that needs to be replaced. My desktop reboots repeatedly unless I stop it with the DEL key and go to BIOS and run it in fail safe settings
Thank you in advance.

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You can download ubcd, or minipe, and burn them to a cd, if you have another computer, then insert the cd of your choice (minipe is a bit easier), minipe has a start menu similar to the normal windows start menu, somewhere in that menu, there should be a chkdsk, or check disk utility, you would want to run that, and choose yes when it asks if you want to check for bad sectors

Posted on Jan 20, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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3 Answers

Can I fix my Seagate hard drive to bootable?


Hi, two things to try.
1. If you have the Win7 cd/dvd, go here and read:
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/start-the-windows-7-recovery-environment/

But I'm thinking that you have a few bad sectors in the HD's boot area (educed from your tzak.tzak description - which is head seek (bang) trying to find the boot sectors). Which I'm not sure that Win7 recovery can cope with. But check out this link and read/follow links:
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-system/how-to-fix-the-boot-sector-of-windows-7/deb6ad12-a6b1-46fc-9786-240f66f9143e

And this link (better?):
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-system/restoring-windows-7s-master-boot-sector-to/435f7bf7-9d5b-4741-9746-945ff06e6251

or
2. Go here and get SystemRescueCd:
http://www.sysresccd.org/SystemRescueCd_Homepage
It contains many tools for the repair of malfed systems.
You will want to use this tool: TestDisk
TestDisk[4]
Popular disk recovery software. Recovers lost partitions and repairs unbootable systems by repairing boot sectors. It can also be used to recover deleted files from FAT, NTFS and ext2 filesystems. File system recovery is supported for reiserfs, ntfs, fat32, ext2/3 and many others.

In closing, I would get a new HD, maybe a SSD? to replace your original hard drive (It may be failing, or it took a hard knock while in the boot phase, causing head-bang in the boot sector - not good). Make the new drive your master and use the old one for misc. data that you have originals of, i.e. music cd's, dvd movies, programs off-loaded from Tivo/DVR, etc.

Hope this at least gets you going in the right direction...

Oct 25, 2014 | Seagate BARRACUDA Computers & Internet

Tip

I have tested several programs, but the program below, just really worked for...


Let's try to explain the question that grinds us all when in cams about the hard disk. Can we actually repair a bad block? Before of the answer you must find some information about what is a hard disk, how does it work, what are bad blocks. After that you must identify them because you will need the exact location of the affected sectors. After you have done that you must run a few steps:
- before you try to resolve the problem with the bad sector you must extract the data that was written to that block. To do this you must run a Recovery program that you can find freeware on the net.
- bad sectors are unreadable parts on your hard disk but the nature of them must not be always physically and that part of the platens to be destroyed. The bad sectors can be simulated by some programs. This means that some programs installed on your computer can interrupt the reading process on to another segment of the platens. That is in the most happier cases but the chances that the bad sectors are cause by this is less then 10 percent. In this case is difficult to resolve the problem because even the Scandisk or other identification programs used to discover bad blocks will give a rapport that nothing is wrong with your hard disk. The best way is to uninstall the latest programs applied to the computer.
- lets supposed that you have a 20 gigabits partition on your hard disk that has bad blocks. After the identification program it will indicate you where are the blocks situated on the partition. So this way you can isolate them in to another partition that you must never use again. Another scenario can be created and the bad sectors can be at the beginning of the partition in the middle of it and at the end of the partition. Know it's a little bit tricky because you can't just go on and create three new partitions to eliminate the bad sectors from use. In this case most of the new hard disk has a spare space available just for this type of scenarios. You must access the CASH memory of the hard disk and indicates to the hard disk that instead of writing down on the effected blocks it must write to the spare blocks.
- another to restore the hard disk is to use the low level format option. Many of you think that low level format is a program. Wrong, the low level format option is set for any BIOS and can be easily use if you know some command line programming. The low level format can take to be complete a very long period of time but in the most cases we can obtain marvelous results. Actually the low level option takes every cluster of the hard disk and identifies them again (throw a thermal process) and writes down on the memory of the hard disk what sectors can be written and witch blocks are un-writable. This procedure is the best that can be because it will need no effort from your side to try and avoid the bad blocks that already exists and the hard disk itself know where the bad blocks are.
In conclusion the bad blocks can't be fixed. The problem is a permanent one and we can only try to use the hard disk until it is broken down for good. But if you are having financial problem this is a best way to keep going with your old hard disk.

on Mar 12, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My toshiba satellite A215-S5837 when trying to bootup gives error message cannot boot do you want to start from last good boot. I say yes it still does not boot just goes so far and then I get clicking...


once you get a bad sector it usually spreads like a virus through your hard drive. the best thing to do is to buy a new hard drive, install it and do a clean install of windows. you can buy or borrow a hard drive enclosure and rescue your documents from your old drive but isolating the bad sector doesn't work, especially if your drive is making a noise

Jan 13, 2011 | Toshiba Satellite A215-S5837 Notebook

2 Answers

My operating system is corrupted by a virus i tried to slave my hard drive but i can only see my hard drive in bios and i cannot see it in my local disk drive and im hearing clicking sound inside my hard...


Try to boot from your OS cd or recovery disc. Run the disk check software and see if your hard disk is mechanically ok or it crashed. If your hard disk is mechanically functional then run virus check on your hard disk. This will clean all the virus infections. And you will be alright hopefully.
If your hard disk's boot sector is damaged you may want to format the hard disk and place the boot sector in another portion of hard drive.

Nov 07, 2010 | Samsung 250GB HD250HJ SATA II 300 7200rpm...

1 Answer

Very slow at start up and shuts down at will.


hi, ( O.S - win XP / windows 7)
u need check the system virus/spy virus/Had disk bad sector. 1. After system ON press F8 key 3. Select the safe mode with command prompt 3. Type : chkdsk and enter it will check the bad sector,lost clusters,cross -linked files and lost clusters, directory errors. 4.If u found any Bad sector - u need format with Low level format Hard Disk / if not any bad sector (a) Run with Anti Virus with latest updates.
Rgd, Manju

Feb 10, 2010 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

How we will repair the hard disk


Your antivirus program should be checking the boot sector for viruses. If it doesn't find any, and your machine boots fine, there's nothing else you need to do to the boot sector. The boot sector is also called the MBR - master boot record.

If there's something else you're trying to check it for, tell me what you're looking for.

Jul 18, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

Bad Sector on Harddisk


Set defrag to run at boot up and it will resolve any bad sectors you have, and will write a new boot registry for you.

Jul 17, 2008 | Hitachi Deskstar 7K80 Hard Disk 80GB,...

1 Answer

BAD SECTORS


Your hard drive is divided into bits called sectors. When these sectors start to go bad, that means that the computer cannot read or write any data on those sectors. You cannot remove bad sectors and once you start seeing bad sectors it is a sign that your hard drive is about to crash permanently so you need to replace your hard drive and make sure you back up all ofyour important data immediately.

Jul 06, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I cant identify the prolem


It looks like you may have a boot sector virus. A boot sector virus is one that infects the first sector, i.e. the boot sector, of a floppy disk or hard drive. Boot sector viruses can also infect the MBR. All disks and hard drives are divided into small sectors. The first sector is called the boot sector and contains the Master Boot Record (MBR). The MBR contains the information concerning the location of partitions on the drive and reading of the bootable operating system partition.

When disinfecting a boot sector virus, the system should always be booted from a known clean system disk. On a DOS-based PC, a bootable system disk can be created on a clean system running the exact same version of DOS as the infected PC. From a DOS prompt, type:
    SYS C:\ A:\
and press enter. This will copy the system files from the local hard drive (C:\) to the floppy drive (A:\).
If the disk has not been formatted, the use of FORMAT /S will format the disk and transfer the necessary system files. On Windows 3.1x systems, the disk should be created as described above for DOS-based PC's. On Windows 95/98/NT systems, click Start | Settings | Control Panel | Add/Remove Programs and choose the Startup Disk tab. Then click on "Create Disk". Windows 2000 users should insert the Windows 2000 CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, click Start | Run and type the name of the drive followed by bootdisk\makeboot a: and then click OK. For example:
    d:\bootdisk\makeboot a:
Follow the screen prompts to finish creating the bootable system disk. In all cases, after the creation of the bootable system disk, the disk should be write protected to avoid infection.

Once the OS loads, run your anti-virus software and it should clean the virus.

Should this not help, I'm afraid the only other alternative would be to reformat the HDD and reinstall XP again from a bootable disc.

Hope that helps..

May 07, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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