Question about MSI G31M3-L V2 Desktop Board - Intel G31 - Enhanced SpeedStep Technology - Socket T - 1333MHz, 1066M... Motherboard

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Board is power connected but cpu no heat - MSI G31M3-L V2 Desktop Board - Intel G31 - Enhanced SpeedStep Technology - Socket T - 1333MHz, 1066M... Motherboard

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  • MSI Master
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Hello download the manual here:

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/G31M3-L-V2---G31M3-LS-V2.html#/?div=Manual

Unzip the file when downloaded, and you need adobe reader to read the content.

Here is a troubleshooting guide:

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/261145-13-perform-steps-posting-boot-video-problems

Good luck

Posted on Jan 08, 2013

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1 Answer

When the system is turned on the power light goes green for a second or two and then beeps and goes red.


You can fix it yourself. The CPU was to hot and the solder has come off. Bad part is the solder is under the CPU and must be heated up. It is lead free so it needs more heat then lead and you need to add flux. I would start by getting the board out. Remove the thermal paste off the CPU. Add flux with a flux pen. You want to get the flux under the CPU so you might want to tip it on its side. After you have a good amount of flux under the CPU you want to start to heat the parts around the CPU. I would use a heat gun with temp. settings. You first want to heat around the CPU to keep solder on the other parts from cracking. You dont want to over heat the parts. After you preheat the board you want to heat the CPU. It needs to be around 400 or 500 degs f. a good 15 or 30 sec. keep moving the heat gun. After heating the CPU you want to start the cool down. Same as warming up the board but you want the board to cool down slow. After all this you want to add New thermal paste to the CPU. This helps transfer from the CPU. This is a must because your PS3 is overheating as it is. After you do all this some people say it only works for 2 to 6 weeks. Its all on how you find the board and how good of a job you did. I would back up your hard drive. Then hope for the best!! good luck and i hope this helps you out.

Apr 14, 2011 | Sony Playstation 3 (PS3) Console

2 Answers

My computer was making loud noises, then shut down and won't restart. Could it be the fan went out?


It could be the cooling fan to the power supply but it sounds like that went completely out and blew the Zenor Diode or something in the power supply. You can test the voltages coming off the power supply to make sure. If that is what happened you are better off simply replacing it. You can get them at Best Buy for about $40 and it is a simple 4 screws to remove in order to trade them out. Make sure you have the correct connectors for the motherboard. If the Power supply is good then you lost the CPU fan. If the CPU fan went out and the computer will no longer start up you may have cooked the CPU. Again, this is something you can replace fairly easily. The fan should run about $12 to $20 depending on what model you get and what type of CPU it has to mount to. The hard part will be the CPU itself. If it has overheated to the point of burning a connection inside the CPU will have to be replaced and while it should not be soldered on the board the heat sink will be very difficult to get off and when you put the new heat sink on to the old CPU or a new one you will need heat sink compound. Runs about $1 a tube. If the CPU just overheated and shut down the PC should restart once it has cooled if nothing else till the CPU heats back up. Usually takes a couple of minutes but not long. This is actually good news if this is what is happening as it means the CPU is most likely operational and that is the expensive part to repair in an over heat situation. The problem does sound like a blown power supply though. If you have to replace the heat sink and CPU fan once you get the old stuff off and as much of the old heat sink compound off as possible make sure you apply new compound to the CPU. You do this by applying a small amount to the center of the CPU and pressing the heat sink into place, this should spread the compound evenly and thinly over the CPU area and form a bond between the heat sink and the CPU to transfer heat between them. The fan normally attaches to the heat sink and locks down on the CPU. Connect the Fan power wires into one of the power supply sockets and everything should come on when you power on the computer. While you have the case open you should take the opportunity to use canned air to blow the dust out of the case and air circulation holes. Heat and Dust are not your friends in computers. Good luck with your repair.

Nov 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

How conect the power switch ?


If you look closely on *********** board, you will see the PW SW printer on the board.
This is the on off connection to be made by the power switch.

Nov 27, 2009 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

Cannot turn on cpu


when you say cannot turn on cpu - what do you mean - ?
cannot boot up?
try removing the cmos battery for a minute then replace and try again.

any error beeps ?


working fine before ?

Oct 11, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

2 Answers

Computer does not fire up. I do have steady green light on power supply. All motherboard connections appear to be tight.I have come home before to a beeping noise in the past. After resetting the machine...


That beeping noise may be due to over heating.
Most machines today have a temperature setting that will turn the machine off once the temperature reaches a certain point.
Safety feature to avoid damaging your cpu and components.
The shut down and restarting allows the CPU to cool down briefly.
Thus allowing you to start the machine again. Usually it will shut down again once the temperature threshold is again reached.
Good test is let the machine sit for 30 min. If it immediately starts up and shuts down a few minutes later. Heat build is usually the problem.

Typically this is due to heat sink or Fan on the computer CPU.
Check to be sure both are connected to the CPU and functioning.
If you have a fan on top of the heat sink above the CPU. Make sure it is working correctly. Dust build up over time will eventually kill the fan bearings or reduce airflow. Heat sink can and will become clogged with dust also. Replacement fans are easy to find. Heat sinks are even easier to clean.
Depending on your machine and CPU position replacing the fan can be a challenge. But can be done in a few minutes with minimum tools.

Each bios has different post codes and it is difficult to tell what is happening with out knowing the bios of your particular machine. Listen for the beeps and check your computer manual.
You can also google for this. Here is a web site that lists a few bios P.O.S.T codes.
http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm
Once you know the beep sequence you can look it up. Usually points to the problem and you can go from there.

Good luck!

Oct 06, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Fails to boot, fans and lights on, no bios or anything


My recommendations would be to remove all connections to the board.
Remove the CMOS battery.
Remove the CPU fan and CPU.
Look at the top of the CPU, if you have a crust over the top of the CPU, you will need to remove it to a clean surface.
Next, your CPU fan should be a 3 wire connection on the motherboard, within two inchs of the CPU holder.
After cleaning the CPU, re-inseart and apply a heat sink lub for good heat transfer.
Re-install CPU fan and plug in to board connection.
Re-install your CMOS battery and power up unit.

With the CMOS battery removed, the time and date will need to be reset.
Also, in the BIOS for that board, you should be able to see temps. and rpm readings. ??
Hope the CPU has not taken a dump on you.!
Before you plug in the drives and other devices, check temps. rpm and voltages.
Have fun, hope this has helped you.

Oct 06, 2009 | ASUS P5GD1-VM Motherboard

1 Answer

Buzzer sound from motherboard spkr


Hi kuldeep11203, your Intel D101GGC board uses the Award bios. http://www.bioscentral.com/beepcodes/awardbeep.htm

Though the descriptions vary, I suggest you check your CPU heat-sink & fan assembly. Clean assembly from excessive dust build up. Remove CPU fan if possible & clean the heat-sink. Check the CPU fan, it may be turning too slowly & may need to be replaced. The average CPU fan runs between 2000 Rpm & 3000Rpm. Blow out your power supply with canned air. Disconnect & than re-connect the Main power connector (2x12) on the board. Item No# K, found on page 11 in your manual. Try these first. See if the buzz sound stops after a good cleaning.
If not replace the Heat-sink assemble with a new one. Check this link for a new assembly for LGA775 socket;
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=heatsink+and+fan+for+LGA775+socket&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=heatsink+and+fan+for+

Good luck kuldeep11203!
Mike

Nov 21, 2008 | Intel D101GGC Motherboard

3 Answers

P4P800 SE vs P4P800 Mx


The general answer is yes.

1) Both of these boards have the same CPU socket:
"Intel Socket 478", so they are CPU compatible
at the pin level.

The different support chip-sets (North and South bridge)
do provide different I/O features and bus optimizations,
but this is NOT a problem to the CPU, nor an issue to
worry about.

2) Also, both these boards are smart enough
in the BIOS, to automatically detect the CPU
and to automatically set the clock speeds and
power supply voltages.

The P4P800 board is more then fast enough to take full
advantage of the 2.4 GHz CPU.

The only time you could get into trouble is if you
override the BIOS settings to over-clock or over-voltage
the CPU or memory, without knowing what you are doing.

3) If you are not sure, just let the BIOS do its thing, and auto
set the CPU and memory settings.

However ! ...

4) Be extremely careful when physically swapping the CPU's
and heat sinks:

a) Make sure the computer is physically unplugged,
and the power has been off for a few minutes.

b) Unclip the whole fan/heat-sink assembly as a unit if
you can, and wash the bottom of the heat-sink with
rubbing alcohol to remove the "white gunk"
(heat-sink transfer compound)

Similarly clean off the CPU's after you remove them from
the socket, do NOT drip alcohol onto the mother-board,
because it could dissolve, soften or contaminate it.

The alcohol will NOT hurt the metal heat-sink, nor the
ceramic top of the CPU.

c) To remove the CPU from the socket (and to replace it)
release the socket lever on the socket FIRST.

The CPU should slide in and out of the socket without
ANY force what so ever, and make sure that PIN-1
and the shamfered corner are oriented correctly !!!

If you plug in the CPU the wrong way, and power it up,
it is GAME OVER !!!

d) Take extreme care not to STATIC zap the mother board,
or the CPU. Wrap a thin bare wire around your wrist,
and connect the other end to the computer case,
before handling ANY electronic parts.

(With the computer still turned off and unplugged :)

This is EXTREMELY important, because your body
can accumulate a very small charge at a very high
voltage of several thousand volts before you even feel
a tingle, and when discharged can fry or injure every
chip on the board.

do NOT remove the mother board from the box just
to change the chip, if you can possibly avoid it.
Handling motherboards is ALWAYS risky due to
the risk of static as well as flexing the board and
braking internal "plate-through-hole" connections.

I am an expert many times over so please take my
word for it.

5) After you install the new CPU in its socket, but BEFORE
you re-attach the heat-sink, you need to apply a liberal
amount of NEW white heat-sink compound between the
heat sink and the CPU.

This white goo is a silicon based grease that drastically
improves the heat transfer from CPU to heat sink, i.e.
lowers the thermal resistance in degrees per Watt,
to keep the CPU from overheating.

Many people skip this important step, but if your CPU
overheats, it won;t last long.

The heat-sink compound is available from any electronic
or computer shop.

6) Make sure that you clean and reconnect the CPU fan,
and check that it is working properly.

7) Make sure that your power supply is strong enough to
provide the additional current required by a faster CPU.

Keep in mind, that the amount of power consumed, and
heat generated by the CPU is directly proportional to
frequency and to the square of the operating voltage.

Also, faster CPU's never last as long as slower ones,
due to increased nano-scale current densities and
atomic scale erosion due to these currents. Although
the currents are miniscule from our point of view, so are
the circuit geometries, and if you do the math, (I have)
the effect of sending some of these internal currents
through the nanometer-sized conductors is like forcing
the Mississippi river through a half inch pipe.

The sheer momentum of the electrons is sufficient to
knock whole atoms out place and slowly erode the
tiny semiconductor structures.

All chips WILL fail in time. The faster they run the sooner
they fail, but hopefully "after" they become obsolete.

8) So make sure you have enough fans to keep things cool.

9) Finally it is good to identify your speed bottle necks,
before you start changing things, for example:

If the RAM is marginal, it will not run reliably at the
increased bus speeds. The mother board (BIOS)
compensates for this when calculating the timing
settings, and increases the number of bus-cycle wait
states. The net result is that your faster CPU can result,
in a slower computer under some conditions.

Another thing people tend to ignore is the amount of RAM.
RAM is 10,000,000x faster then hard disk.

When a computer (Windows) starts running out of RAM,
it begins to swap less used data to hard disk, in a process
called virtual memory paging. If it pages too much, it is
called thrashing. A thrashing computer can take hours or
even days to perform a task that should only take a few
seconds.

Increasing the speed of the CPU by 20% often doubles the
cost. The same amount of money is put to better use
increasing the amount (and quality) of RAM, with much
more impressive results.

For a Pentium-4 based XP machine I recommend 2 Gigs
of RAM, only because 32-bit Windows can only access
4-Gigs, 2 of which are reserved for the OS and remapping
the video card. This leaves 2 Gigs for user app's.

IT is possible to configure windows to use a little more, by
setting the /3GB or the /uservalu= switch within the boot.ini
file but this can lead to unforeseen complications.

The problem with 64-bit windows is that it still has limited,
driver support and you need a 64-bit motherboart/CPU
such as a core-2-duo.


Good luck, please rate my answers.

Martin






Jul 15, 2008 | ASUS P4P800-VM MB, 865G/ 800FSB/ SATA/...

1 Answer

DFI Infinity NF4 SLI won't start


Hi steve, PC repair is trial & error. I suggest you replace the power supply or test the power supply in another PC that also uses 4 SATA drives & two PCI-E slots for starters. Two boards with the same problem is odd. You must have the CPU & fan connected, memory installed, ATA 24_pin main power plugg connected (Page 17 in manual). 4-pin_12v power connected which is located (Just to the left of DDR1 memory slot). Looking at you're board the power supply should be no less than 500w.
CPU must have thermal grease between CPU & heat sink.
Even though you have fans running & LED's on & flashing, the power supply seems to be the first item to check. Make sure the bottom of the motherboard is not touching the PC case.
Try the above & post you're finding here.

Good Luck!
Mike

Jun 28, 2008 | DFI Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Motherboard ABIT KN8


i dont know about the red light, but all main boards these days have a built in protection if the cpu fan quits. check the cpu fan connection, ensure that it and the heat sink are dust free. if still no go. update  your question with exact info..e.g. does absolutely nothing.. how many beeps you hear..how long b 4 it dies.. final note: be careful what you touch.. static can harm more that most think and the oil from touching can retain heat.

Oct 29, 2007 | Abit KN8 Ultra Motherboard

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