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Breaker tripped and when reset still no power to outlets. there are 2 with gfci and 2 without niether gfci will reset whats up?

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  • 30 Answers

Reset the GFCI and they will all work. The other two are down stream from the gfci.

Posted on Apr 07, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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tborn6
  • 700 Answers

SOURCE: 3-pole 60 Amp Circuit Breaker is tripped and won't reset.

check ot see if its on a shunt trip system. what it means is that in order to reset the breaker you have to see what made it trip. Look for a 115 volt breaker that is tripped in the panel that serves tha line. good luck.

Posted on Jan 25, 2009

tjt3
  • 44 Answers

SOURCE: gfci breaker for spa

gfci's are designed to trip if they receive voltage on there ground/neutral side, therefore my vote is for Smithbrother I would say there is probably a partial short somewhere in you system.

Posted on Mar 24, 2009

protek480
  • 1714 Answers

SOURCE: 50 amp GFCI breaker trips after spa runs for 45

More than likely, it's the element. They begin to 'leak' small current as they get old and this will trip the GFCI

Posted on Jul 11, 2009

  • 143 Answers

SOURCE: arc circuit breaker won't reset

yes

Posted on Sep 20, 2009

Testimonial: "thank you for the advice it worked and everything is working. "

  • 302 Answers

SOURCE: I just tested the breaker and it won't reset. I

yes. If you still have the fault it will not reset. Disconnect the out going wire to isolate the breaker and try again. If it still doesn't reset then the GFCI breaker is bad and needs to be replaced. Hope this helps you, Jeepfxr

Posted on Jan 28, 2010

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1 Answer

What meaning of e7 error code on disply starway split airconditioner.


This is all I could find for E7 error code:

E7 Loss of 120 VAC power to all power module boards on the system. The system will shut down.

Look for tripped circuit breaker or tripped GFCI outlet. Any outlet wired downstream of GFCI (for example on same circuit as GFCI in bathroom) will lose power if bath GFCI is tripped.

May 13, 2017 | Miscellaneous

1 Answer

Admiral washer. Did load of laundry, breaker tripped, and is still full of water. Reset breaker, and hear a small click after I pull knob to restart washer. Breaker trips. No leak, and outlet is good


The washer tripped the breaker once and OR after the breaker was reset it ran additional loads with no problem then it tripped the breaker again.

Intermittent problems are always difficult to diagnose because the problem usually doesn't occur when you're making the checks.

If the washer ran additional loads the problem will not be an electrical short with one of the washer parts. If the lid switch had a short it wouldn't run the additional loads.

You don't say if the additional loads used the same cycle as previously. A timer can have an internal short that might trip the breaker in heavy duty cycle but not the permanent press cycle.

If you have access to a clamp on amp meter, see the image below, then you can check the amp draw of the washer. The washer normally will draw about 10-15 amps at start up and about 5-8 amps while running. The house breaker for you washer should be rated at 20 amps.

If the washer is running and drawing less than 20 amps and the breaker trips then if can be a weak house breaker.

Mid cycle the washer is most likely draining or spinning and if the bearing or pump locks up then the washer may draw additional amps to try to start and trip the breaker.

The key to this problem is what the amp draw of the washer is when the house breaker trips.

To narrow this problem down, there are three places that could be causing the ( outlet) GFCI to trip, a malfunction in the washing machine, a problem with the downstream wiring (aka load side of the GFCI-other items connected on same circuit), or the GFCI outlet itself. If there isn't anything downstream, then plugging the washing machine into another GFCI outlet, or simply swapping out the outlet for a known good GFCI outlet, will identify if the outlet itself is faulty.
If the outlet trips when the washing machine isn't running and isn't even plugged in, then there's a fault in the wiring on the load side of the GFCI outlet.
If the issue is neither of the above, then running the washing machine and monitoring to see which step is occurring when the trip happens will isolate what part of the washing machine may be leaking current to a ground. It could be a certain water level, a motor being engaged, a transition step in the controller, etc
Beware some techs believe that most Washing machines or any other motor should not be on a GFCI! Should be a dedicated single receptacle. If there are other outlets on the washer GFCI, replace that GFCI with a single receptacle and put the GFCI on the next jump in order to protect other outlets.

Another item to check is ur lid switch which may have gotten moister inside and created a short_ or broken open and the rubber seal dried out over time, and the switch assembly will be exposed. water can splash onto the assembly, somehow causing the GFCI to trip. In any event, if you are having trouble with your washing machine stopping mid-cycle for any reason, test and replacing the lid switchis probably a worthwhile idea, as it is cheap and easy to replace.
By the way my advice is free cuz God is good!











May 22, 2015 | Admiral Washing Machines

1 Answer

How do i fix hoover vision hd washing machine that blew a house fuse then machine comes on will not start cycle ***


The washer tripped the breaker once and OR after the breaker was reset it ran additional loads with no problem then it tripped the breaker again.

Intermittent problems are always difficult to diagnose because the problem usually doesn't occur when you're making the checks.

If the washer ran additional loads the problem will not be an electrical short with one of the washer parts. If the lid switch had a short it wouldn't run the additional loads.

You don't say if the additional loads used the same cycle as previously. A timer can have an internal short that might trip the breaker in heavy duty cycle but not the permanent press cycle.

If you have access to a clamp on amp meter, see the image below, then you can check the amp draw of the washer. The washer normally will draw about 10-15 amps at start up and about 5-8 amps while running. The house breaker for you washer should be rated at 20 amps.

If the washer is running and drawing less than 20 amps and the breaker trips then if can be a weak house breaker.

Mid cycle the washer is most likely draining or spinning and if the bearing or pump locks up then the washer may draw additional amps to try to start and trip the breaker.

The key to this problem is what the amp draw of the washer is when the house breaker trips.

To narrow this problem down, there are three places that could be causing the ( outlet) GFCI to trip, a malfunction in the washing machine, a problem with the downstream wiring (aka load side of the GFCI-other items connected on same circuit), or the GFCI outlet itself. If there isn't anything downstream, then plugging the washing machine into another GFCI outlet, or simply swapping out the outlet for a known good GFCI outlet, will identify if the outlet itself is faulty.
If the outlet trips when the washing machine isn't running and isn't even plugged in, then there's a fault in the wiring on the load side of the GFCI outlet.
If the issue is neither of the above, then running the washing machine and monitoring to see which step is occurring when the trip happens will isolate what part of the washing machine may be leaking current to a ground. It could be a certain water level, a motor being engaged, a transition step in the controller, etc
Beware some techs believe that most Washing machines or any other motor should not be on a GFCI! Should be a dedicated single receptacle. If there are other outlets on the washer GFCI, replace that GFCI with a single receptacle and put the GFCI on the next jump in order to protect other outlets.

Another item to check is ur lid switch which may have gotten moister inside and created a short_ or broken open and the rubber seal dried out over time, and the switch assembly will be exposed. water can splash onto the assembly, somehow causing the GFCI to trip. In any event, if you are having trouble with your washing machine stopping mid-cycle for any reason, test and replacing the lid switchis probably a worthwhile idea, as it is cheap and easy to replace.
By the way my advice is free cuz God is good!




May 17, 2015 | Hoover Washing Machines

1 Answer

Es-f800ks washing machine is power supply problem..That means is when i plug in the power then just 3 second only comming..after that no power..I try it many time ..It's same things..


The washer tripped the breaker once and OR after the breaker was reset it ran additional loads with no problem then it tripped the breaker again.

Intermittent problems are always difficult to diagnose because the problem usually doesn't occur when you're making the checks.

If the washer ran additional loads the problem will not be an electrical short with one of the washer parts. If the lid switch had a short it wouldn't run the additional loads.

You don't say if the additional loads used the same cycle as previously. A timer can have an internal short that might trip the breaker in heavy duty cycle but not the permanent press cycle.

If you have access to a clamp on amp meter, see the image below, then you can check the amp draw of the washer. The washer normally will draw about 10-15 amps at start up and about 5-8 amps while running. The house breaker for you washer should be rated at 20 amps.

If the washer is running and drawing less than 20 amps and the breaker trips then if can be a weak house breaker.

Mid cycle the washer is most likely draining or spinning and if the bearing or pump locks up then the washer may draw additional amps to try to start and trip the breaker.

The key to this problem is what the amp draw of the washer is when the house breaker trips.

To narrow this problem down, there are three places that could be causing the ( outlet) GFCI to trip, a malfunction in the washing machine, a problem with the downstream wiring (aka load side of the GFCI-other items connected on same circuit), or the GFCI outlet itself. If there isn't anything downstream, then plugging the washing machine into another GFCI outlet, or simply swapping out the outlet for a known good GFCI outlet, will identify if the outlet itself is faulty.
If the outlet trips when the washing machine isn't running and isn't even plugged in, then there's a fault in the wiring on the load side of the GFCI outlet.
If the issue is neither of the above, then running the washing machine and monitoring to see which step is occurring when the trip happens will isolate what part of the washing machine may be leaking current to a ground. It could be a certain water level, a motor being engaged, a transition step in the controller, etc
Beware some techs believe that most Washing machines or any other motor should not be on a GFCI! Should be a dedicated single receptacle. If there are other outlets on the washer GFCI, replace that GFCI with a single receptacle and put the GFCI on the next jump in order to protect other outlets.

Another item to check is ur lid switch which may have gotten moister inside and created a short_ or broken open and the rubber seal dried out over time, and the switch assembly will be exposed. water can splash onto the assembly, somehow causing the GFCI to trip. In any event, if you are having trouble with your washing machine stopping mid-cycle for any reason, test and replacing the lid switchis probably a worthwhile idea, as it is cheap and easy to replace.

Mar 29, 2015 | Washing Machines

2 Answers

When plugging it in to the socket it powers up only for a minute then trips the power any ideas?


The washer tripped the breaker once and OR after the breaker was reset it ran additional loads with no problem then it tripped the breaker again.

Intermittent problems are always difficult to diagnose because the problem usually doesn't occur when you're making the checks.

If the washer ran additional loads the problem will not be an electrical short with one of the washer parts. If the lid switch had a short it wouldn't run the additional loads.

You don't say if the additional loads used the same cycle as previously. A timer can have an internal short that might trip the breaker in heavy duty cycle but not the permanent press cycle.

If you have access to a clamp on amp meter, see the image below, then you can check the amp draw of the washer. The washer normally will draw about 10-15 amps at start up and about 5-8 amps while running. The house breaker for you washer should be rated at 20 amps.

If the washer is running and drawing less than 20 amps and the breaker trips then if can be a weak house breaker.

Mid cycle the washer is most likely draining or spinning and if the bearing or pump locks up then the washer may draw additional amps to try to start and trip the breaker.

The key to this problem is what the amp draw of the washer is when the house breaker trips.

To narrow this problem down, there are three places that could be causing the ( outlet) GFCI to trip, a malfunction in the washing machine, a problem with the downstream wiring (aka load side of the GFCI-other items connected on same circuit), or the GFCI outlet itself. If there isn't anything downstream, then plugging the washing machine into another GFCI outlet, or simply swapping out the outlet for a known good GFCI outlet, will identify if the outlet itself is faulty.
If the outlet trips when the washing machine isn't running and isn't even plugged in, then there's a fault in the wiring on the load side of the GFCI outlet.
If the issue is neither of the above, then running the washing machine and monitoring to see which step is occurring when the trip happens will isolate what part of the washing machine may be leaking current to a ground. It could be a certain water level, a motor being engaged, a transition step in the controller, etc
Beware some techs believe that most Washing machines or any other motor should not be on a GFCI! Should be a dedicated single receptacle. If there are other outlets on the washer GFCI, replace that GFCI with a single receptacle and put the GFCI on the next jump in order to protect other outlets.

Another item to check is ur lid switch which may have gotten moister inside and created a short_ or broken open and the rubber seal dried out over time, and the switch assembly will be exposed. water can splash onto the assembly, somehow causing the GFCI to trip. In any event, if you are having trouble with your washing machine stopping mid-cycle for any reason, test and replacing the lid switchis probably a worthwhile idea, as it is cheap and easy to replace.
By the way my advice is free cuz God is good!







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when-plugging-in-socket-powers-up-only-fgv1ctnzjgewe3hu2qpqylbk-3-2.jpg

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Mar 22, 2015 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

I got 2 wascomat gen5 that trips breakers only on rinse cycle


The washer tripped the breaker once and OR after the breaker was reset it ran additional loads with no problem then it tripped the breaker again.

Intermittent problems are always difficult to diagnose because the problem usually doesn't occur when you're making the checks.

If the washer ran additional loads the problem will not be an electrical short with one of the washer parts. If the lid switch had a short it wouldn't run the additional loads.

You don't say if the additional loads used the same cycle as previously. A timer can have an internal short that might trip the breaker in heavy duty cycle but not the permanent press cycle.

If you have access to a clamp on amp meter, see the image below, then you can check the amp draw of the washer. The washer normally will draw about 10-15 amps at start up and about 5-8 amps while running. The house breaker for you washer should be rated at 20 amps.

If the washer is running and drawing less than 20 amps and the breaker trips then if can be a weak house breaker.

Mid cycle the washer is most likely draining or spinning and if the bearing or pump locks up then the washer may draw additional amps to try to start and trip the breaker.

The key to this problem is what the amp draw of the washer is when the house breaker trips.

To narrow this problem down, there are three places that could be causing the ( outlet) GFCI to trip, a malfunction in the washing machine, a problem with the downstream wiring (aka load side of the GFCI-other items connected on same circuit), or the GFCI outlet itself. If there isn't anything downstream, then plugging the washing machine into another GFCI outlet, or simply swapping out the outlet for a known good GFCI outlet, will identify if the outlet itself is faulty.
If the outlet trips when the washing machine isn't running and isn't even plugged in, then there's a fault in the wiring on the load side of the GFCI outlet.
If the issue is neither of the above, then running the washing machine and monitoring to see which step is occurring when the trip happens will isolate what part of the washing machine may be leaking current to a ground. It could be a certain water level, a motor being engaged, a transition step in the controller, etc
Beware some techs believe that most Washing machines or any other motor should not be on a GFCI! Should be a dedicated single receptacle. If there are other outlets on the washer GFCI, replace that GFCI with a single receptacle and put the GFCI on the next jump in order to protect other outlets.

Another item to check is ur lid switch which may have gotten moister inside and created a short_ or broken open and the rubber seal dried out over time, and the switch assembly will be exposed. water can splash onto the assembly, somehow causing the GFCI to trip. In any event, if you are having trouble with your washing machine stopping mid-cycle for any reason, test and replacing the lid switchis probably a worthwhile idea, as it is cheap and easy to replace.




Mar 17, 2015 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

No power to two kitchen outlets. Reset breaker.


GFCI? Reset outlets. There are usually gfci outlets in kitchens.

Jan 30, 2015 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

I tripped a circuit breaker but a reset didn't resolve power to the outlets. I replaced cgi outlet hoping that would resolve the issue but it didn't. What is the problem and/or issue? Can&#


I believe you are referring to a GFCI receptacle. Did
you have power at the GFCI Location? If so, make sure
you wire the line and load portion of the GFCI unit properly.

Jul 31, 2012 | Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Electricity went out in 1 circuit while using my table saw w/washer going. I replaced the breaker & have 240 volts comming out of it but no electricity to receptacles or switches, So I replaced all...


In workshop areas, the NEC specifies GFCI (ground fault circuit interruptor) outlets.
If you replaced any GFCI outlets, there could be 2 possible problems:
(1) modern GFCI outlets will pass zero voltage if wired backwards (i.e. a load/feed reversal).
check the load/feed wiring of all GFCI outlets, to make sure its correct.
The feed side of the GFCI outlet is wired directly to the breaker, and the load side feeds power
to the remainder (the downstream side) of the circuit (therefore protecting the entire downstream
side of the circuit).
(2) older GFCI outlets could need to be reset if wired correctly - check the reset button(s) just to
make sure that they (and any downstream outlets) are receiving voltage.
Assuming that no GFCI outlets were part of the replacement process (or that your GFCI outlets
are correctly wired), your check for the presence of 240 VAC
should begin at the outlet/switch closest to the 240VAC double pole breaker, and proceed from there (looking for that 240VAC at each device with your 2-prong tester) along to the end
of the circuit until the problem is identified.
What this implies is that you have created (or will create) a schematic or circuit diagram of the
circuit involved - including switches, wires, and outlets (240V and 120V) - and then use that as a
resource to trace the possible sources of the problem from the breaker to the problem.
Here's the question I would want you to answer as you create your circuit diagram:
How did a 240V table saw get on the same circuit as a 120V washer and/or 120V switch(es)?
It seems like during the process of circuit tracing/diagram creation, you may find
that you're dealing with parts of more than 1 circuit, rather than just one. Check the breaker box
for any breakers that are in the "Tripped" position - and diagram those circuit(s) too.
What I would suspect is a wiring problem/mistake with the 1st device (switch or outlet) that is
supposed to feed power to the rest of the circuit, but fails to pass power on to the remainder of the circuit - or that that first device is actually wired to a second circuit with a tripped breaker.

Another thing to check is that your shop may be on its own sub-panel, with the table saw
on a 240VAC circuit, and the washer on its own 120VAC circuit. In this case, the
total curent draw may have tripped the MAIN breaker to this sub-panel in the MAIN breaker
panel (i.e. none of the breakers in the sub-panel were tripped, but the main breaker feeding the
ENTIRE sub-panel tripped, and this (double pole) breaker is located in the MAIN breaker panel).
In this case, the fix would be to reset the double pole breaker in the main panel that feeds the
shop sub-panel, bringing all the sub-panel circuits on line.

The last thing to suspect/check for is a fault in the wire itself, which is the most difficult problem to
diagnose. The fix to a bad wire would be re-fishing a new wire from the breaker box to the 1st
device box - no electrical inspector will require the removal of old wires from walls - so long as they
are not live.
What would make your life alot easier, and what helps electricians diagnose these problems so
quickly, is an electrical field tester (a.k.a. "chirper" tester), which would allow you to check
the wire as it leaves the breaker box to the point where the electrical field disappears.
At the point (point in the wire/outlet/switch) where the chirper stops chirping, you've found your
fault. At Home Depot/Lowe's/electrical supply store, a electrical field tester will set you back
about $8 to $20, depending on whether you opt for one that just lights an LED, or one that
lights and LED and also chirps.

Sep 04, 2011 | Electric Drill Scaler

2 Answers

What is wrong when you install a GFI outlet and the green light in the corner goes on than goes right back off than when you try and plug something in the outlet it doesn't have power?


It means that the outlet has tripped. There are one of three problems which you can check. 1. The outlet was wired wrong. On many new GFCI receptacles if the wiring is incorrect the receptacle will trip and not allow you to use it. Proper wiring methods can be found by searching in your search bar "how to wire a gfci". It is possible that what was plugged in went over the amp rating of the GFCI. causing it to trip (note: not as likely as your main circuit breaker would have tripped first). The only other things, which has happened to me a lot is the outlet can be super sensitive to current change. GFCI measure high and quick rises in current. If it is too sensitive to the rise in current the receptacle will trip. In this case it will need replacement, and the store will exchange it for you free of charge.

Jun 11, 2010 | IDEAL 61-534 Digital Breaker Finder W/GFCI

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