Question about House Brand Heating&Air Conditioning Booster Fan

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Not heat on 1st and 2nd floor but basement is great

I have a baseboard water system and I got the air out of the baseboards and I clean them up but it did not work. It could be that the baseboars are to old. The ones in the basement are new.

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I can help, but I need a little more info. What kind of boiler do you have, and is it gas, oil, or electric heated, and do you have an air seperator with an expansion tank on it. It basically sounds like you are not moving water through the system. The only to causes for this would be a bad circulator pump, or it is simply air locked. I would check out the circulator pump first. It will most likely be attached to the boiler, and will be in line on the main pipe coming out of the boiler. It is driven by electric, so check out the wiring, and electric supply going to it. There are many brands of these pumps out there. The most common are Taco, Garfundos, and Bell & Gossit. If the pump is pumping, then I would find the highest point of the system and bleed it from there. This can sometimes be a timely undertaking. Just because you are not getting any air out immediately, doesn't mean it isn't there. A good rule of thumb is to take out a gallon of water. If you don't get any air then, your probably good to go. Also remember to make sure your supply water valve is open to put that water back in. Let me know how you do...Rob

Posted on Dec 28, 2009

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Getting the wiring connections correct to the terminals in the back plate is essential. Understanding better which colored wires do what functions for your particular brand and model of HVAC gear proves essential, too: "That's the rub!"

Unlike the brilliant and wisely-instituted electrical code, a sensible common "code" for HVAC thermostat wires doesn't exist--each brand, and many models represented by such brands--may have their own peculiar wiring color conventions. HVAC techs also have noted the increasing numbers of brands and models in the market these days, as well--thus, they too may resort to online help threads concerning such issues. (Certainly, the wiring conventions for heat pumps differs also from that of a conventional heat/air setup.)

Unfortunately, many of Youtube's demonstrations from HVAC pros prove merely general info concerning HVAC systems--these may prove somewhat useful: Being merely general info, they're often not specific enough always for particular units, though. (This proves keenly true concerning thermostat wiring.)

Always switch off the circuit breaker for your HVAC system before proceeding with wiring. My system is a Goodman heat pump--it uses a five-wire thermostat setup: The 44134 model from Hunter doesn't feature a terminal in the back plate for the "C" wire for that. (The blue wire from my Goodman heat pump is the "Comm" or "C" wire--that's very confusing in it's own way--the "B" terminal on the back plate for the 44134, and most other programmable thermostats, often is used with B-coded wires for other manufacturers' HVAC units--generally, "B" wires for such units are blue, as well--beware of reliance upon wiring colors!)

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Unless you know your system's peculiar wiring very well (that is, you're likely an HVAC tech), don't try to connect a Comm wire to another terminal on the back plate for the 44134--you'll likely ruin your thermostat (perhaps along with some other HVAC electronics): You may need then to get an HVAC tech out, after all!

As indicated above, don't merely "match" wiring colors (as a woman might for interior decorating or remodeling)!: This proves a continuing and overly common, comical mistake! Prove instead somewhat skeptical of thermostat wiring colors! A Biblical scripture applies: "Be as wise as serpents!" Take your time to get wiring connections right!

I've noted that the 44134 unit relies totally upon 2 AA batteries (not supplied in the package)--those must be in good working order and oriented correctly--otherwise, your thermostat and HVAC system won't function. Furthermore, the control unit may be easily removed from the back plate--thus allowing "easy-chair" configuration--again, HVAC and fan functions will halt immediately--the connected unit proves necessary for continued function.

Hunter also points out (on their packaging as well) that the 44134 (and, many other (if not all) Hunter thermostats) won't work with baseboard heating systems. Hunter's site FAQs prove too sparse--some may prove keenly useful, nonetheless.

I can't yet get my heat pump system to work with Hunter's "always on" fan switch setting--the rightmost "Auto/On" setting for that bottom-mounted switch at the right. Perhaps a jumper wire proves necessary in the back plate terminals--somewhere. (I've noted this also for Hunter's common 44277 model, as well.) I glean perhaps that somehow invoking the "G" terminal proves necessary. As usual, investigation proves warranted.

Definitely note the "Cool, Off, Heat" switch on the bottom left of the unit: Yeah, that's all too easy to forget. The Hunter 44134 doesn't provide any feature allowing automatic switching between heating and cooling--one must choose which function for the thermostat to control. If the switch is set to "Heat," cooling isn't possible--and, vice-versa.

For reference and troubleshooting, keep the manual and install instructions in a safe, memorable, and easily accessible place. Hunter does provide PDF manual versions online--installation instructions prove lacking online though--they're not in the user manual, either. Unfortunately, Hunter doesn't upgrade it's PDF manual versions.

I glean that Honeywell units may prove generally more easily configurable than Hunter units. Nonetheless, configuring Hunter units proves far from impossible, though. Configuring Hunter thermostats prove perhaps not as "intuitive.": The formal user manuals provided by Hunter thus may prove more keenly necessary for their thermostats' configuration.

Getting personal help online from Hunter may prove somewhat difficult (that may have changed recently). A few years ago, I called customer support: A woman answered my wiring question very satisfactorily. (I noted a jumper wire connect to the terminals of my old manual thermostat--she indicated that the jumper proves unnecessary in Hunter units.) Hunter phone support hours prove somewhat limited--they're similar to traditional office hours.

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Without the particulars of your HVAC system and thermostat wiring, it proves very difficult in some cases for Fixya and other DIY sites to provide correct answers. (Most DIYers ultimately do succeed with install and use of programmable thermostats, though.)

"Proust" thanks you for getting this far!: Perhaps some of my particular solutions here do prove useful to some of you--more nit-picking, detailed work and anecdotes (intended for specific brands and models) needs to be offered in this area....

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