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ORECK STEAM-IT 100RH ALL PURPOSE STEAM WAND

Used vinegar and water instead of just water. No steam will come out.

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

jonniewalker
  • 1029 Answers

SOURCE: steam wand not working


The steam wand ejects steam in order to froth the milk. The steam wand should be cleaned after it is inserted into milk and at the end of each day. Do not allow the steam wands to soak in water overnight since some of the dirty water can be sucked into the boiling tank inside the machine this may cause the steam not to come out
Unplug the machine, take the case off, disconnect the switch wires and test it with a continuity meter. If you don't get any continuity, or if it is constantly closed and never open, the switch is bad.
this could have been prevented by regular maintenance and proper use. The usual suspect is a gummed up wand or brew line or user error. Here’s what to look for and how to avoid it.
First, notice what kind of wand you have. Most semi-automatic and porta-filter espresso units will have wands that resemble those on bottom or right, although the tips may be different. Some tips do not slide up and down to alter the aeration, as the one on the bottom does. If your wand is from an older (1990s) unit, it could have a more bulbous tip and a smaller hole in the tip. wandte1.jpg wandte2.jpgSome of the new wands give you a manual/automatic control.
wandte3.jpg Many of the new super automatics come with an automatic frothing unit, like this one from Jura-Capresso. The nice thing about the frothing wands on Jura-Capresso's new units is that they allow for even more control.
The "Dual Frother Plus" (top) works like the traditional frothing wand. The metal sleeve goes up for steam, down for foam.
The "Froth Xpress Plus" is a very handy device which can be used with the included sleek milk container or a distinct milk container, like a 1/2 gallon jug. The Froth Xpress has a tube (hard for using the included container, flexible for using a different container) that fits into the frothing tube behind the dial shown in the picture above. After selecting froth or steam, the milk is siphoned into a cup below the steam wand. We recommend steaming the milk first, then adding the espresso.

Whatever sort of wand you have, it is essential to keep it clear of solidified milk which can gum up the tip and even the wand shaft. Here are some symptoms of a clogged wand:

  • Little or no steam comes out of the wand
  • Hot water drips from the tip of the wand
  • A squeal or whistle comes out of the wand when the steam function is selected
  • A deep humming is heard when the steam function is selected*
*This is also a symptom of another more serious problem, particularly if you have a pump espresso machine; so if unclogging the wand does not solve it, you should contact a technician.
A good preventative measure against the clogging of a steam wand is regular rinsing in warm, soapy water of the tip and any other removable frothing part. This should be done after each steam wand use. If your machine has a Froth Xpress, it is important to clean all of the hoses, valve, and connectors (be very careful with the plug, however, because it is delicate). All wands should also have steam jetted through them after a frothing cycle is run.
Another preventative measure is to run a steam cycle for about twenty seconds before each new use. This will eject stray particles before they can build up and cause serious damage. There is also a cappuccino cleaner available which can be used in the automatic frothing devices. The solution is placed in a reservoir, and a full cycle is run until the reservoir is emptied. This can be done every few weeks or every few months, depending upon use.
Aside from prevention, there are treatments for a clogged wand. First, remove the tip, if the tip is removable. Usually they are, as in the case of the plastic tips above. The holes are usually big enough to run a pin or even a small paperclip through (emphasize small) to remove the gunk. If these items are too large, do not attempt to use them; instead try using a thin gauge wire from an electrical wire strand. Next, the metal wand itself can have a pipe cleaner run up into it. Start out by putting just about a half inch of the pipe cleaner up the wand, rubbing it around, then pulling it out. Gradually work more of the pipe cleaner up the wand, but never let the length of pipe cleaner in the wand exceed the wand length. We recommend the pipe cleaners with the stiff barbs attached, as opposed to the mostly soft ones. Do the same for all of the hard hoses and connectors. With respect to rubber or soft plastic parts, rinse them in soapy hot water. If flexible hoses form holes, replacements are available (give us a call) or we've even had some luck at aquarium supply stores.
PLEASE NOTE: if you own the Jura X7 or the Froth Xpress Plus, the diameter of the tiny holes is very important. We recommend trying not to put pins into these holes. However, if they must be cleaned and soaking won't work, a smaller gauge wire, a single strand, should do the trick. Always use a strand that is smaller than the diameter of the hole.
Frothing wand technology is advancing at a breakneck speed, but along with these advances come serious precautionary measures for dealing with these very delicate mechanisms. Follow the steps above, and your machine should be producing full-fledged froth for its entire life.

Posted on May 26, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: water leaking from steam wand when brewing shots

Try this from another post. It should help.

The steam wand began to seriously leak but a call to Starbucks Customer Service line and I was talked through how to adjust it so that the leaking stopped. It requires taking off the top/back panel of the machine (6 philips screws) then using a small allen key (1.5 mm I believe) to loosen and adjust a plastic oblong donut-shaped thing (a "cam" actually) on the shaft of the steam knob... no more drips.
The key to prevent dripping is to open the steam knob without putting pressure on it when it gets to the full-open stop position. Cranking it too hard when it comes to a stop in the full-open position will slowly move the cam out of position. Then the shaft doesn't fully seat inside the machine anymore and won't fully shut off the water to the steam wand. Then, no matter how hard you crank the knob in the shut-off position it will still drip. The purpose of the cam is to stop the knob from complete unscrewing and it also turns the pump on and off for the steam wand. The cam adjustment is very small but completely solves the dripping problem. Seeing inside the machine made me realize how easy it would be to repair problems as long as I can get the parts from Starbucks or perhaps Saeco.

Posted on Dec 29, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Starbuck's Barista steam wand leak

remove the cover from the machine, loosen the allen screw that fastens the steam knob to the shaft, move it slightly and retighten to allow the knob to close the valve a bit more. I have had to do this a few times in the 9 years I've had my machine as either the knob loosens or the valve threads wear a bit.

Posted on Mar 03, 2009

  • 7 Answers

SOURCE: No steam, just hot water.

The steam wand has to be removed to be cleaned properly. Unfortunately, this procedure is not outlined in the manual. Just cleaning the wand on the outside or using a clip to clean the tip is not enough.

The other end of steam wand where it connects to the pressuring cabin actually swivels around a fitting. It is this fitting that you need to thoroughly clean. Years of using the machine can cause calcification around this fitting.

If you look under this end of hte steam wand, you should see a philllip-headed screw. Before you loosen this screw, you have to remove the grey trim so that the entire wand can be remove.

Once the entire wand is removed, what I just described will be much clearer.


Posted on Mar 18, 2009

  • 14 Answers

SOURCE: Starbucks Barista Espresso Maker

This is a general comment for people having problems with leaks and pressure in their espresso machines. If you do not used filtered water, the minerals and other materials suspended in the water will bond to the moving parts and tubes of your machine (e.g.: scale). The problem will be worse if you live in an area with particularly hard water. In some cases the pressure pipes can get completely blocked and if the pump is powerful enough, the pipes can rupture, otherwise, the pump will simply not put out any water. The solution is to regularly flush out the system with descaler. The frequency of cleaning depends upon how often you use the machine. You can get descaler from any decent coffe place (like Starbucks), an appliance repair place, or the hardware store. I use CLR which is sold at hardware stores. CLR stands for Calcium-Lime-Rust, and it effectively cleans all of these and is cheaper than specialty scale removers. Simply dilute some in water and pour the mixture in the machine, then cycle the pump and run it through. Collect the spent liquid and run it through again 4 or 5 times (or more if you've never cleaned your machine before...) Allow the liquid to sit for 10-15 minutes between flushes so that the solution has a chance to eat away at the scale. Once you have done this a few times, flush out the machine thoroughly with clean water 4 or 5 times, using CLEAN water each time you rinse. If you want to get an idea of the scale that has been removed, keep a small amount of the original clean solution in a glass and then compare the spend cleaning liquid with unused cleaning liquid to see the difference. The spent liquid should be foggy/muddy compared to the clean stuff and if you let it sit, the scale will settle to the bottom of the glass and will be clearly visible. You can prevent some of the buildup in your machine by using filtered water as they do at Starbucks.

Posted on Jun 05, 2009

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follow this adjustment and fix it. God bless you

Clean an iron:
  1. Unplug the iron and make sure it is cool before cleaning.
  2. Use a toothpick or pipe cleaner to remove buildup in the steam vents, making sure the debris doesn't fall into the vents.
  3. Use a fine sewing needle to carefully clean the spray nozzle of mineral deposits.
  4. To flush sediment from a steam iron, pour 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup vinegar into the water tank. Place the iron on a rack over a broiling pan and set the iron to steam until the tank runs dry. Repeat if necessary. Or follow the instructions for using a commercial iron cleaner.
Service the steam and spray mechanism:
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  2. Use a fine sewing needle to unclog the steam valve assembly. Also, check the valve spring and replace it if it is broken or has lost tension.
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Nov 04, 2013 | Oreck Steam-It Steam Wand

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I can't get the iron to steam. I wrote to the company and followed the self cleaning steps and still no steam


Hi, Brown water and whitescale are often the result of the water you use in the iron... If you have scale, white vinegar will clean that... For brown water, empty the iron, rinse out the insides with bottled water, and then use the bottled water instead...

Also check out this tip...

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heatman101

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Can't get milk to foam


Place 1/3 part distilled white vinegar and 2/3 part water into the water reservoir. Turn the machine on and wait for the heat light to go off. Once the heat light goes off, turn the steam vs. water knob to the water drop icon, and turn the main function knob to steam/water. Make sure to have your frothing cup underneath the steam element ready to catch the water. The vinegar/water solution should clear out the calcium that clogs the steam element. Also, remove the cover to the steam element and dip it in a bowl with vinegar for about 5 minutes, and use something like a pipe cleaner to clean out that cover. Then apply vinegar and hot water to a rag and clean the calcium off the shaft of the steam element. Once you are all finished with this, run plain water through the espresso maker on the steam/water setting to clear out the bitter vinegar residue. Now, try again to make espresso and froth it.

Since milk contains calcium, the steam element has to be decalcified more often than a regular coffee maker. The EM-100 is a beautiful machine, but it is definitely high-maintenance - you will probably spend more time cleaning it than making cappuccino, etc.

Good luck!

-Tha Mp3 Doctor (is also a huge Cuisinart fan)

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