Question about Olympus ? Stylus 500 Digital Camera

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Flashing problem with Olympus stylus500

My flash is not sensing properly. For the same subject with the same lighting, I'll take the same shot 5 or 6 times--sometimes the flash flashes, sometimes it doesn't, some shots come out too dark or some overexposed, but rarely just right like they used to. Whether I use auto setting or change the setting, the results do not improve. This problem just started after my camera was about 3 1/2 years old. Is it worn out or is there something I can do to help it?

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  • jff5 Dec 22, 2009

    Don't have a solution - but hav the sam problem.

    Anyone else knows any solution?

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It sounds like you have a short in your camera. Could be from a drop or just from age. You can either take it into a service center or might just be easier to replace it since camera prices aren't to bad. Hope this helps.

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

Tip

Improve Camera Photo Result


These days digital cameras are found in a variety of other gadgets. In fact Camera are one of the fastest growing segments of the digital camera market and with the improvements in the quality of what is being offered in some digital cameras (higher megapixels, better lenses, high capacity storage) some believe that they are beginning to win market share away from the low end offerings of many digital camera manufacturers.


You can get the most out of your cell phone camera just follow these tips:

  • LIGHT YOUR SUBJECT WELL:
The better lit your subject is the clearer your image is likely to be.If possible shoot outside or turn on lights when shooting inside.
If you’re turning on lights in a room to add extra light to your
shot be aware that artificial light impacts the color cast in your
shots and you might want to experiment with white balance to fix it.

Some cameras come with a built in flash or light – this can really
lift a shot and add clarity to it, even if you’re shooting outside
(in a sense it becomes a fill flash.f your camera doesn’t have a flash or light you should avoid shooting into bright lights as you’ll end up
with subjects that are silhouetted.

  • GET CLOSE TO YOUR SUBJECT:
One of the most common mistakes with camera images is that their subject ends up being a tiny, unrecognizable object in the distance. Camera images tend to be small due to low resolution
(although this is changing) – so fill up your view finder with your
subject to save having to zoom in on the subject in editing it later
(which decreases quality even more).

Having said this, getting too close on some model camera
creates distortion and focusing issues (particularly if the camera
phone doesn’t have a macro or close focusing mode.

  • KEEP STILL:
As with all digital photography, the more steady your camera phone is when taking your shot the clearer your image will be.

This is especially important in low light situations where the camera will select longer shutter speeds to compensate for the lack of light. One trick is to lean your camera phone (or the hand holding it) against a solid object (like a tree, wall, ledge) when taking shots.

Keep in mind that many camera also suffer from ’shutter lag’
(ie the time between when you press the shutter and when the camera takes the shot can be a second or so). This means you need to hold the camera still a little longer to ensure it doesn’t take a shot as you’re lowering it away from the subject.

  • DON'T THROW AWAY MISTAKES:
Remember that on many cameras the quality of the screen will not be as good as your computer’s. So if possible hang onto your shots until you can get them on your PC. You might just find that they come alive on a quality monitor. You’ll also find that even ‘mistakes’ and blurred shots can actually be quite usable (in an abstract kind of way)

  • AVOID USING THE DIGITAL ZOOM:
As tempting as it might be to zoom in on your subject when taking your picture (if you have a zoom feature on your camera), if the zoom is a ‘digital zoom’ it will decrease the quality of your shot to use it (you’ll end up with a more pixelated shot)..

Plus you can always edit your shot later using photo editing software on your computer.

Of course some camera phones are beginning to hit the market with ‘optical zooms’ – these are fine to use as they don’t enlarge your subject by enlarging pixels.

  • EXPERIMENT WITH WHITE BALANCE:
An increasing number of camera come with adjustable white balance which allows you to modify color balance in your images based on shooting conditions. Experiment with this feature to get a good feel for the impact that it has on your shots. I find that it impacts different camera differently. Read your manual to find out how it works on your phone.

  • TAKE LOADS OF SHOTS AND EXPERIMENT:
The beauty of all forms of digital photography is the ability to shoot off many shots quickly and without cost. This means you can experiment with different modes and composition and discard those that you don’t want to keep.

Cameras are particularly good for experimenting with new angles and perspectives – shoot from down low, up high, close up etc and you’ll end up with interesting and fun shots.

  • KEEP YOUR LENS CLEAN:
One of the challenges with many cameras is keeping them maintained and clean. Cameras spend a lot of time in pockets, in bags and being used in all manner of weather and conditions. As a result they get dirty and can easily become damaged – fingerprints are a common problem on camera lenses – especially if your phone doesn’t have a lens cover. From time to time clean the lens of your camera using a soft cloth (sunglasses cleaning cloths are great).

  • OBSERVE CAMERA PHONE ETIQUETTE:
While there is no formal set of rules for using camera – it is worth considering how you use it and what impact it might have upon others. There are many cases of cameras being abused to take sneaky or voyeuristic photos. Ask permission to photograph strangers, consider restrictions on the use of cameras in places like theaters and concerts etc.


  • USE THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION POSSIBLE ON YOUR CAMERA:
Some cameras allow you to choose what resolution you want to take photos at. It almost goes without saying (but we like to state the bleeding obvious) that the higher your resolution the clearer your shot will be. This is especially true for cameras which often have sensors of under 1 megapixel in them. Keep in mind however that the higher the resolution the larger the file size of the images you take – this means if you want to send images they can end up taking a long time to send.


Thank You!




on Dec 15, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

I have a Canon 5D and a 430EX flash. When shooting pictures my flash will delay way to long before I can shoot another picture with flash. One picture is good and 3 are dark. My flash card is a...


The 430ex flash is E-TTL, that means it adapts is power to the scene. If you shoot a scene at 10 meters, the flash will choose to flash at the max power, and will take time to recharg. Try to get closer to your subject, and remember that the flash can only lighting your subject, not the whole scene.

Dec 14, 2008 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

2 Answers

Flash


This is the AF Assist feature. If you don't have a hot-shoe flash mounted, but you do have the pop-up flash raised, the camera will strobe the pop-up flash in low-light situations to provide illumination for the auto-focus to work. You can disable it by turning off the AF ILLUMINATOR option in the "Wrench 1" settings menu.

Mar 09, 2008 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Flash


Just hit the flash mode button until the get the lightning bolt symbol meaning constant flash. I use this all the time on the same camera for a backlit subject when I need a fill flash
Mike

Jan 06, 2008 | Olympus Camedia C-2040 Zoom Digital Camera

2 Answers

Out of focus shots at night


First, check to see if you're in auto or program mode, as opposed to manual or possibly even aperture priority (if it supports it). Typically, auto or program mode sets your shutter speed to around 1/60th of a second, which is usually good enough to hand-hold a flash shot without blur. The camera should emit enough flash - within its range, of course - to get a good exposure. You typically won't get a good flash shot if your subject is more than 10-12 feet away. If you want, you should be able to go back and look at the way your camera was set for each shot with a program like Photoshop or Elements. That information is stored as "EXIF" data, and if you select a file in Photoshop CS' file manager for example, you should be able to see what the shutter speed was on any given shot. Let's suppose you look at some old, blurry night-shots - the EXIF data, that is - that should've turned out OK and your shutter speed and everything look fine. At that point, I'd try taking some flash photographs using a tripod at night which would eliminate camera-shake as a possible cause of the blurry shots. I suspect that the likely cause was your camera wasn't in the correct mode though and once you get that squared away, it'll be OK. Good luck!

Sep 13, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-770 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Batteries


The Olympus Ni-MH batteries will provide approximately 200 shots with typical usage (half of the images shot with flash/half without flash and minimal use of the LCD monitor).

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-740 Ultra Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the NIGHT & PORTRAIT Scene mode. In this mode, the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod - otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select PROGRAM AUTO mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-630 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the Night Scene mode. In this mode the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select Auto or Program mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-435 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the Night Scene mode. In this mode the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select Auto or Program mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

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