Question about Sansui Vintage Receiver 800, In Near Mint Condition With Original Owners Manual

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When I switch receiver on a loud pop (snap) sound is heard from speakers

Looks like a sharp peak signal is released from capacitor or something That happens only in moment when I switch it on, after that receiver plays normal (there is no problem if I switch it of and on within 5 minutes) One more thing: receiver continues to play 5-6 seconds after switched of I'm not an electronic expert and will appreciate any suggestion and help ..... Thanks a lot ... Dragan

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I have the same rz 6880 av 5.1! bt im not facing that problem. Iv connected my Bose III series speakers to it...and it plays well. Maybe you need to check your system with a qualified personnel.

Posted on Feb 17, 2008

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mlapres
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SOURCE: Tone switch causing loud pop in speakers tripping protectiveRelay

The tone control on this one sounds like it is an active one and either using the low or high pass filter you would be boosting the higher or lower frequencies. Boosting the lower frequecies will be harder on the amplifier, in which case if you would like to use then you may need to connect speakers with a lower impedance or higher sensitivity.

Posted on Dec 12, 2009

dunnbiker
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SOURCE: I am fixing a sansui

So you're saying ac doesn't get very far into the unit. THAT should be easy to diagnose with CARE since ac is usually passed unmodified to the fuses and power supplies, maybe through a relay. Get a digital voltmeter and find out where it disappears after getting into the unit.

Posted on Dec 31, 2010

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