Question about Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Underexposed, grainy images with a light stripe running down the center

Whenever I take pictures with a flash indoors, the images come back underexposed with a heavy grain and a narrow light colored stripe running perfectly down the center. The stripe is as if a narrow strip were more exposed than the rest of the image. If I take flash pictures outside, the exposure is okay but the stripe is still there, faintly. Bright sunshine pictures are just fine. I checked the flash sync according to instructions (open back, open the aperture, and flash against a white background) and there didn't seem to be a problem. I started having exposure problems a couple of months ago, thought it was a light metering problem and now am having the stripe problem. See for an example. Thanks!

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer
Re: Underexposed, grainy images with a light stripe...

Sounds like your shutter curtain is malfunctioning. Did you bump the curtain when u loaded film & bed it... Take a close look to see if it is binding. This is a very fragile area to monkey with & should be done by a qualified repairman

Posted on Sep 22, 2007

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Focus circle clear but surrounding area appears hazy

This is often the result of little available light on the focus screen. The more ambient light (and more open the aperture is) the brighter and sharper the image is in the viewfinder. Less light effects the image in the view finder and makes it harder to see and focus.

If your lens only opens to f3.5 or 4.0 and you\'re trying to shoot indoors with available light - your lens may not let enough light into the camera to see the scene as well as you can with the naked eye. An f1.4 aperture lets eight (8!) times as much light as an f4.0 does and is why they\'re so expensive.

Try the same setup in a brightly lit (sunny day) scene to see if it goes away.

Good luck!

Apr 06, 2014 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Shutting off flash

Yes, but not in the Auto mode, where the camera decides whether or not it needs the flash. Switch to the P mode, which works like Auto except you have control over the flash, exposure, and other factors. See pages 26 and 42 of this manual.

Apr 12, 2013 | Canon EOS Rebel 2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My pictures have a purple tint to them

You're either using old/expired film, or taking photos during dusk. Color film is balanced for daylight photography. Using it under conditions other than that will result in varying color casts on the resulting images.

Fluorescent lighting: Greenish
Indoor bulbs: Reddish/orange
Outdoor at night/dusk: Blueish/purpla
Ourdoor at dawn: Pink/blue

Or, you may have just gotten bad print work done. Try a different lab.

Jun 12, 2011 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I took 4 rolls of film in for development but when I got them back all of them were either very under or overexposed despite taking all the pictures according to the light meter in the viewfinder of my...

Are you looking at the picture as in a print OR are you holding the negative up to the light and looking at it that way. Don't touch the negatives, they should be in a protective sleeve but you can see through it. You should be able to see if the spacing between the frames is messed up and if you have lighter and darker negatives. Looking at a print from an automated one hour service isn't worth the time of day to determine a problem. The Pentax K1000 is the work horse of the century for students learning photography and a lot of them have seen extensive use, also the camera is quite old. What I expect is if the negatives are showing overlapping frames AND the exposure is off sometimes over and other times underexposed then the camera needs service lubrication and adjustment. It's great that the light meter is working but the shutter speed could be off and the advance is skipping giving the overlap. I don't know where you are in this world but in Canada that's a $80.00 to $120.00 fix and have the repair person change the light seals while he/she has it apart.
The Pentax K1000 is still a great camera it's up to you whether or not to spend the money. I can't tell you what to do but I can suggest that if you are going to shoot film you find some place that does it with a little more human touch. Hope this was a help

Jan 24, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My equipment: N75, 28-80, 70-210, 50fixed. I generally use Ilford 100 or 400 b & w films. I seem to have a - recurring - problem with the end result. The pictures are severally grainy, irregular...

The grainy nature of the picture is nothing to do with the camera. Do you develop your own film? If you don't and you are paying for processing, find a new processing house! If you are; the problem is reticulation. In any case the 400 ASA negative film will be more grainy that the 100 ASA. Both will benefit from some thoughtful processing. Key points that will help are: Do not over-develop or "push" the film. Pushing is leaving the film in the developer for longer than the recommended time (on the instructions in with the developer chemica)l. Pushing will increase the effective film speed by a controlled amount, but will always increase grain size, some times worth the price. BUT... the most common reason for graininess when not "pushing" film is reticulation. This is caused by the simple mistake of washing the film after developing and fixing (hopefully at 20 degrees C), in cold tap water. The sudden temperature change causes the grains to join up (Reticulate, just like a giraffe!) into bigger grains. Not reversible. Just do the wash stage in water that is the same temperature as the developer and the fixer. Of course the wash or stopper between dev and fix can cause the same problem... same answer, have everything at 20 degC. The irregular patches (dark on the negative) will be caused by insufficient agitation during development. The tank should be inverted every few seconds, or if in a commercial dev line, it should have nitrogen gas agitation every few seconds. Usually what happens is the dev house runs out of nitrogen but doesn't realise it has. If you can post a sample of your pictures I can be more accurate with a diagnosis, or email some to me at

Dec 22, 2010 | Nikon F75 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Hi, I have taken over 20 rolls of film so far and haven't had a problem until now. Whenever, I go outside to take pictures (in the daylight), my pictures come out black (last 5 rolls of film) In the same...

I think the aperture is not shutting down to the opening you set it to. In an SLR, the aperture is normally fully open for viewing through the lens. When you press the button, the mirror flips up and the aperture closes to the figure you have set, then the shutter fires. If you have set a daytime aperture and the aperture sticks, you get a wide open aperture and an overexposed shot, but at night, you have set an open or almost open aperture anyway.

It is possible that the shutter is the problem, but the aperture is more likely to go wrong in my experience. It only takes a drop of oil on the blades. There ought to be a button or lever to shut the aperture down for depth of field preview which you could use to test this, or just look in the lens when the shutter fires to see if the aperture closes.

Nov 14, 2010 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera

Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

Oct 06, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Nikon F3's light meter always underexposed

needs repairing at a qualified shop
when was it last cleaned or serviced ?
if you think the camera is worthy, since its old how much is it worth to you vs a new one

Mar 06, 2010 | Nikon F3/T 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Light meter

Yes, on the camera body, you have to remove the lens. The ring sits outside the metal mount for the lens.

Feb 20, 2008 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How and when to use the flash

When you take a shot slower than 1/20, the shutter takes longer to close. This means while it is open, it will record everything. The best way to correct this is not the flash really. Try putting it on a tripod. This way you can lower your shutter speed without sacrificing crisp pictures. Also, with a built in flash, you get a very shallow lit area. If your subject is far from the camera, the flash won't do much good. When this happens, the only thing to do is get a stronger mounted flash or slow your shutter down and open up your aperture. Hope this helps. Keep me posted. Photography is a never ending learning process.

Oct 15, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera Logo

Related Topics:

76 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon 35mm SLR Cameras Experts


Level 3 Expert

93922 Answers

old marine
old marine

Level 3 Expert

1298 Answers


Level 1 Expert

24 Answers

Are you a Canon 35mm SLR Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides