Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm Lens

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There is a message in front of my picture on the monitor

The message tells the camera, shutter, metering, aperture, expoaure and flash mode. Its a Nikon D80 and I need to know how to make the message go away.

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When viewing pictures in playback mode, simply turn the index finger dial (up by the shutter button) and this will change the 'mode' in which you view the pictures and should eventually get you to a setting where this information disappears.

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

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Bought cheap extention tubes, now camera wont recognize the lens. How do I use them


Set the exposure mode to "M" (Manual). You'll have to set both the aperture and shutter speed yourself.

You'll also get no exposure assistance from the camera's light meter. You can review the picture after taking one and/or use the histogram to tune the exposure.

Sep 30, 2013 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a canon rebel T3 . How do I change the aperture ?


On right hand top of the camera there is a Mode dial. Move the dial to Av (aperture priority) then rotate the wheel in front of this dial to set the F stop. The shutter speed will automatically adjust by the light meter.

Dec 01, 2012 | Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 Digital Camera

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Olympus E-300 Evolt when you press the shutter button to take a picture, the shutter rapidly repets for about 9 times


Solution 1 • Unlock focus area selector. • Auto-area AF selected for Custom Setting 2 (AFarea mode): choose another mode. • Press shutter-release button halfway to turn monitor o?¬? or activate exposure meter • Memory card is full, locked, or not inserted. • Flash is charging. • Camera is not in focus. • CPU lens with aperture ring attached without locking aperture at highest f/-number. • Non-CPU lens is attached: rotate camera mode dial to M. • Mode dial rotated to S after shutter speed of bulb selected in mode M: choose new shutter speed • P, S, A, and M modes: lower ?¬? ash. • Digital Vari-Program modes: turn ?¬? ash o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Press multi selector up or down or rotate sub-command dial to choose photo information displayed Select All for Playback folder. Note that Current will automatically be selected when next photo is taken • Select On for Rotate tall. • Photo was taken with O?¬? selected for Auto image rotation. • Camera orientation was changed while shutter-release button was pressed in continuous shooting mode. • Camera was pointed up or down when photo was taken Use Nikon-approved card. • Card may be damaged. Contact retailer or Nikonauthorized service representative. • Delete unwanted ?¬ les or insert new memory car

Jan 27, 2011 | Olympus Digital Cameras

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I have a Nikon d40X. When I attempt to take a picture, the shutter speed is EXTREMELY slow. Because of this, my pics are all blurry. I am not sure what caused this to start happening. Can someone please...


Steve - the Nikon dSLR cameras are very capable. Check the position of the mode dial:

989d80e.jpg

The image above has it set to "P" or Program mode. Change it to "AUTO" and take a picture of a well lit scene (preferably outside in the daytime). You should get a properly exposed image. If the mode dial is set to "M" or Manual mode, the shutter speed is probably too low, and the aperture either too small or large if the image is dark or light, respectively. You'll have to turn the knobs on the front AND rear to adjust BOTH shutter speed and aperture (f-stop) to find the right combination of exposure time and aperture opening allowed into the camera to suggest motion (more blurry with a slow shutter - or more sharp with a fast shutter), in addition to DOF or depth of field.

You may have a similar issue when set to "P". If you are in this mode, the camera will attempt to determine the best shutter and aperture settings for you. You can veiw the settings chosen in the view finder. Likewise, you may override either shutter speed or aperture changing the aperture OR shutter speed control knobs. The camera will automatically change the other - to provide a properly exposed image.

Review the manual here. Page 39 details the mode dial and how it works. Page 18 discusses the
"Digital Vari-Program" modes depicted by the icons, and the "AUTO" label. These modes should be avoided, unless you are happy with "snapshot" type pictures. The most creativity will come from using the camera in one of the other modes: M,A,S or P. Taking the time to learn them will greatly increase your enjoyment of the camera and resulting images.

I hope this was a good starting point for you & good luck!

Nov 01, 2010 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

My camera is brand new, got it just last week. I tried using the S mode on the mode dial and tried shooting with the fastest shutter speed, but all pictures turned out to be blank/black. The same happened...


Photographing is matching the shutter speed and aperture to the ambient lighting conditions to create the effect you want. 'Auto'- and 'P'-mode should match those automatically. 'S' will choose the aperture and 'A' the shutter speed according to the other. In 'M' -mode the operator is able to choose any combination of the aperture and the shutter speed.

Blank pictures are result of under-exposure, where not enough light has entered the camera to 'burn' the picture. Try to learn to use the exposure meter to define the right exposure or use the 'Auto' -mode.

Jun 20, 2010 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

M42 adaptor


Quite right too. When the M42 adaptor is fitted there is absolutely no exchange of information between the lens and the body: M42 lenses pre-date all of those later developments. Your camera will also be unable to stop down the lens automatically when taking the picture, most M42 lenses don't even stop down automatically when connected to an M42 body.

You need to do things the old-fashioned way. Your camera needs to be set to meter manually, shutter priority mode may also be used. In manual mode you focus the lens as normal with the aperture ring set to the lowest aperture number (i.e.aperture is wide open).
You then make sure that the lens in in manual mode as well and stop down to whatever you want, if the image remains bright enough then you can adjust the precise focus using the hyperfocal principle if you like which takes advantage of the increased depth of field of a stopped down lens.
In manual mode, you then tell the camera what aperture you have set (read it from the lens barrel) and set the shutter speed using the camera's light meter to guide you. If using shutter priority mode then the camera will choose the shutter speed for you.
Check everything is set as you intend and press the shutter.

It all sounds long winded but is exactly how many of the world's greatest photos were taken and soon becomes second nature. You also learn far more about the relationship between aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings and will be able to talk about reciprocity like you know about it!

Jun 26, 2009 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D / Dynax 7D...

2 Answers

Can't take good pictures with new Canon Rebel xsi


You will need to read the manual. I f you have a basic understanding of how ISO, shutterspeed & Aperture width combine to determine the 'right exposure.

Try this:
Set the camera to Av (aperture priority mode). Half press the shutter button and see the light meter indicator to see how well exposed your shot will be. For most cases you would be aiming for a value of 0 (properly exposed). The metering mode determines what part of the frame is used to compute the correct amount of light. For starters begin with pattern metering. Try and aim for a shutter speed of 1/125 or more if you are using the 17-55 mm EF-S f3/5-f5.6. Try and shoot at 40 mm F/5.6 (in Av mode this can be set by rotating the dial near the shutter button.
All the best

Mar 29, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

2 Answers

Shutter priority mode?


s I understand it from what I have seen on the Web, the 3000Z can operate in several modes: 1. Fully automatic (camera select both 2. Manual (user sets both aperture and shutter speed). 3. Aperture Priority mode - user sets aperture and camera chooses correct shutter speed to get a good exposure Apparently there is no Shutter Priority mode (user cannot set only the shutter er speed and allow the camera to set the aperature to get a good exposure). This option is available on the Epson 850Z camera and this seems like a silly ommision to make on a "high-end" camera like the 3000Z.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why do my pictures look too dark?


You may need to use the flash. Make sure the setting is not flash off. If you're using the flash, make sure your subject is within the range of 14 feet for wide angle shots or 11 feet for telephoto shots. Use Image Expert to adjust the picture's brightness and contrast. Try adjusting the camera's exposure or sensitivity settings (use the Manual user mode). If you're taking pictures in the Manual user mode, look for the EV! warning that appears on your LCD screen when you are taking pictures out of the ideal exposure range. If you have trouble setting both the aperture and shutter speed manually, try adjusting the aperture and letting the camera choose the shutter speed with Aperture Priority mode. If you're using the macro mode to take a close-up photo, be sure to provide adequate lighting for your subject. If you're taking a picture at night and you want to light up the background as well as your subject, use the camera's slow synchronized flash mode. If you need more light, attach an optional external flash to the camera's hot shoe.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: AUTO (Factory default setting) Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. SCENE Scene mode enables you to select one of the following scene shooting modes available in the menu. Landscape + Scene shooting Landscape + Scene shooting is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. This mode produces clear, sharp pictures with excellent detail, making it ideal for shooting natural scenery. Landscape + Portrait shooting Landscape + Portrait shooting is suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings QuickTime Movie Quicktime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. My Mode Enables you to make settings manually and register them in the mode dial's mode so you can call up your own shooting mode whenever you want. Program shooting (P) Program shooting allows you to shoot using an aperture and shutter speed that the camera sets. You can set the flash, white balance, or other functions manually. Aperture priority shooting (A) Aperture priority shooting allows you to set the aperture manually. The camera sets the shutter speed automatically. By decreasing the aperture value (F-number), the camera will focus within a smaller range, producing a picture with a blurred background. Increasing the value will let the camera focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions, resulting in a picture in which

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

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