Question about Canon PowerShot SX30 IS Digital Camera

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How to restore images from SDXC type memory card?

Is there a good tool to regain the lost images in SDXc type memory card. IT contains HD images in it

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To retrieve deleted photos from memory card you need a good recovery tool and it must suit your needs .I would like to recommend this because it gives good results in SDXC cards .You can download it here

Posted on Jan 01, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Editor925
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SOURCE: the images in my memory card was gone.

Reformatting a card wipes all the cards content, including the images :(

Posted on Feb 25, 2010

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I have taken the sd card out of the camera, downloaded to my computer and now the camera will not read the sd card? Please help


Hi John,

First, make sure you have the photos on the computer. Once you know they are - then you know you have a working copy of them.

The problem you're describing can be the result of MOVING the files - rather than COPYING the files. Moving is the process of moving the original files from the card and putting them on the PC - while copying leaves the original files on the card and creates a copy on the PC. If you MOVED them then you shouldn't expect to see the original files on the card any longer.

If you copied them and the card no longer shows them or if you copied or moved them and the card is no longer visible the card may have been removed before it completed the file move / copy operation. You should only remove a card / usb drive / similar device when a message pops up saying it is safe to do so.

If: 1) there are no files visible, 2) the card can no longer be read or 3) your computer says the card needs to be formatted first - you may need to do that in an attempt to make the card useable again. If you do not have a copy of the files on your PC - try to copy them to another PC before formatting the card. If you can not get copies of the pictures / files on a 2nd PC, the files / pictures on the card are likely lost. You may find utilities than can restore them however (see link below)

recover pictures from memory card Google Search

Good memory card management includes 1) copying files from memory cards, 2) verifying that they have transferred successfully *and* finally 3) formatting the memory card *in* the camera; *not* the PC. Most cameras offer options to format cards - which is superior to simply deleting files or formatting in a PC. The camera tends to set the card up for its own use - rather than for a PC's use. Formatting the card in the camera can introduce subtle differences that make it worthwhile to do.

Not as much a big deal nowadays - but older devices, cameras, etc. can read / write only to "straight" SD cards. Today, there are SDHC and SDXC types. Make *sure* that you're using the type card your camera expects. Using an SDHC or SDXC card can have unpredictable results when used in devices that expect the older, "straight" SD (no "HC" and no "XC" suffix) type cards. More details about card types can be found linked below:

Back to Basics The Difference Between SD SDHC SDXC and Which is Best for...

Jun 17, 2015 | Bell & Howell DNV16HDZ Full HD Rogue Night...

Tip

How to recover SDXC Memory Card


Storage is getting cheaper, smaller while offering higher capacity every year. 64 GB memory cards are extremely common in today's smartphones, digital cameras, tablets and media players. Due to their sheer capacity, a single failure can cause a local catastrophe with that much information being gone.

http://www.fixya.comwrite_tip-wyytcj10vubwvpdmj0eoj2yx-1-0_0.jpg

Fortunately, the market offers numerous data recovery tools that can help you get your data back. But there is something about these cards you should know before you reach for a data recovery tool.

Flash Chips: Riddled with Defects

Can you believe you can buy the whole 64 gigabytes of fast, high-quality solid-state memory for as little as $20, or does it sound too good to be true? Why is an SSD drive of said capacity three to four times as expensive as a much smaller SD card with similar capacity? Isn't it using exactly the same type of memory, just in a different shell?
In fact, you can't really buy 64 gigs of high-quality flash memory for under $20, and there is a good reason why SSD drives are that much more expensive compared to SD or micro SD cards. The answer is buried in the question itself. Why you can buy a 64 GB microSDXC memory card off Amazon for not much more than $20, the actual flash memory the manufacturer puts in these cards is of a completely different quality compared to that of a typical SSD drive.
So how exactly are manufacturers able to achieve these unbelievably low memory prices? They do smart tricks to make the memory card appear as 64 GB of contiguous space while in fact the actual chip is riddled with defects.
Each memory card employs a tiny microcontroller that maps flash cells to logical addresses. The memory chips are manufactured with abundant capacity. During the manufacture, the chip is tested for defects. Unreadable blocks are simply mapped out and become non-addressable and inaccessible from the outside. Bingo! We've just turned an imperfect chip into a perfectly usable memory card. These tricks are nothing shoddy; they are used by all SD card manufacturers, and they are part of the published SD standard. If not for these tricks, SD memory would probably cost the same (or more) as today's SSD drives.
Now when you know the truth about today's flash chips... can you trust them your data? In fact, you can. Granted, SD cards can sustain a much more limited number of write cycles compared to an SSD drive. When one or more data blocks reach their end of life, the built-in microcontroller of said SD card is supposed to take them out of circulation and assign their logical address to another (working) cell. But what if that cell contained some system information such as a part of a file system? If this is the case, the memory card becomes corrupted, and you'll need to use special tools to extract information from that card.

Recovering Data from SD Cards

Luckily, we have a large number of data recovery tools available on the market that claim to recover the entire content of your memory card. But were they really tested with any of those memory cards in their compatibility lists, or do developers simply assume the recovery will work based on the same principle as traditional magnetic media? In fact, I've seen both and in between. Some products can recover all types of SD cards as they claimed, some other tools can't deal with SD cards at all, while some other tools can only recover SD cards up to 32 GB.
Wait a minute... Why the 32 GB limitation? Why some of the tools can recover 32 GB cards, but fail miserably when reading a 64 GB one? Should the tool either work or not? The reality is more complex than the numbers. While SD memory cards up to and including 32 GB conform to the SDHC standard, larger SD cards (64 and 128 GB) conform to a different standard called SDXC.

Recovering SD, SDHC and SDXC Memory Cards: Is There a Difference?

There is in fact a big difference between smaller (up to and including 32 GB) and larger (64 GB and up) SD cards. The former conform to the SDHC standard, while the latter use the newer SDXC standard.
For you as a user this can mean two things.
  • First, if you are using a 64 GB memory card, make sure that both your portable device and your computer's SD card reader advertise support for SDXC cards (or simply put, they explicitly state support for 64 GB SD cards). If your card reader is old and can only support SDHC cards, you won't be getting anything but errors if you try to read that card with your computer.
  • Second, SDXC cards are formatted with a different file system. Let me explain. When SD cards initially appeared, they used FAT32 as a file system. FAT32 was good enough in the old days. However, this file system has inherent limitations, restricting maximum file size to 4 GB. Just a few years ago this would be a laughable limitation. Today, a typical HD video will already run you more than said 4 GB. If you try to save a large file onto a 32 GB memory card (formatted with FAT32), the write operation will fail.
This is why the SD consortium decided to use a different file system for the new generation of SD cards. 64 Gb, 128 GB and larger SD cards come formatted with exFAT.
exFAT is a new file system developed by Microsoft. exFAT is based loosely on the original FAT32. However, exFAT does not have the limitations of the older FAT/FAT32. exFAT is extensively used in portable electronic devices due to its lightweight design. This was one of the reasons exFAT was selected by the SD consortium as a standard file system for the SDXC format.
Are there downsides to exFAT? There's one, but it's a major one. While exFAT is designed and owned by Microsoft, it's not free. Microsoft requires manufacturers pay licensing fees for using exFAT in their devices. As a result, this has become a limiting factor for many portable electronic devices, especially inexpensive ones. This is one of the reasons why you can use 64 GB SD cards in some devices but not in others.
As a result, when recovering data from a 64 GB SD card, you'll need two things:
  • An SD card reader supporting SDXC (or stating explicitly that it can read 64 GB SD cards);
  • A data recovery tool that supports exFAT;
Not all data recovery tools can support exFAT because of the restrictive licensing model employed by Microsoft. Even if a tool advertises support for "all types of memory cards", it may or may not support exFAT. One of the tools known to support SDXC memory cards and exFAT file systems is Hetman Partition Recovery.

But I've Just Bought a 64 GB SDHC Card!

Sigh. This chapter is probably the most disturbing part of this article. Every other week, we receive an email from a customer describing a typical situation. Because there are so many reports, and because they all describe the same thing, let me just summarize it below.
A guy buys a 64 GB SD card for a price that's significantly below the market. When the memory card arrives, he tests it in his computer, discovering 64 gigabytes of usable capacity. Suspecting that 64 GB of flash memory for under $5 could be a scam, the guy tests the card by writing some data. The writes are extremely slow (3-7 MB/s), so testing the entire capacity would literally take the whole day. He writes some 1-4 GB of data and reads it back. All seems fine, so the guy formats the card and puts it into a phone, MP3 player, digital camera, or whatever portable device he bought it for.
Day after day, week after week the card is filling up with data. Pictures, music and videos are saved onto that memory card. 8 gigs, 16 gigs, 32 gigs, 64 gigs - the writes keep going, the memory card seems to be holding well. Then all of a sudden a photo won't show in a viewer, an MP3 file won't play, a video won't show up. The guy takes the card out and connects it to a PC in an attempt to save the rest of the data. But... oops! There are no photos, music or videos on that card, just garbage.
It is this moment the guy seeks for help and writes us an email. Sadly, in situations such as the one I described our hands are tied: that memory card was a fake. In fact, the "deal" advertises a 64 GB micro SD card for only $4.79. Yes, it's under five bucks for a 64 GB memory card. The description is Pidgin English and reads something like this: "New 64 GB Class 10 Micro SD HC Memory Card with Adapter Fast USA Shipping Dependable memory card for your favorite photos, videos, apps, and games Easily transfer files between phone, tablet and camera" blah, blah, blah.
Remember: if it seems too good to be true, it's probably not true. See that "Micro SD HC" designation? It's a dead giveaway. You can't buy 64 gigs of memory for $5. And, THERE ARE NO 64 GB SDHC CARDS, period. The SD standard dictates that all SD cards with capacities higher than 32 GB are made to conform to the newer SDXC standard. If you buy this card, you won't be getting anything but a fake.
Ditto. Do not buy these. Remember how the packaging looks, and ignore deals that seem too good to be true.

SDXC Recovering 64GB and 128GB Memory Cards Hetman Software

on Jun 06, 2016 | Hetman Partition Recovery - Recover...

3 Answers

What is the maximum size sd card (Gigabites)?


speed class choices.
about compatibility with host devices before choosing your card, it is important that you understand how to use your memory card to it greatest ability. sdxc memory cards and devices (digital cameras, video cameras, laptops, etc.) are now available. learn how to use your new sdxc memory card to optimize its performance.
confirm compatibility before inserting your sdxc memory card, confirm the device is compatible with the sdxc standard by locating an sdxc logo on the device or referring to the device's user manual or manufacturer information.

understanding backwards compatibility
  • sdxc memory cards must only be used with sdxc devices.
  • sdxc devices can use sd memory cards, sdhc memory cards and sdxc memory cards.
  • sdhc memory cards can be used with sdhc devices and sdxc devices.
  • sdhc devices can use both sd memory cards and sdhc memory cards.
  • sd devices can only use sd memory cards.
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/memory-cards,39.html

the link above has several chart on sd cards.









Jan 20, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

Wont accept a new 64GB sd card


The XP10 works with SD cards, 2GB or smaller, and SDHC cards, 4GB to 32GB. It will not work with 64GB SDXC cards.

Apr 14, 2014 | Fuji Photo Film Co. Ltd FinePix XP10 12.2...

1 Answer

My SD high capacity memory card won't work


You call it a SD high capacity memory card, but does it say SDHC on the card, or SDXC. our camera only can use Multi Media cards, SD and SCHC cards (max 32 GByte). So no go for SDXC cards. Still a few things could be wrong if you have a SDHC card. The lock switch on the card could be in the wrong position and the card could have a wrong format. If you did format it in a PC, you should have formatted to FAT 32.
But the best format is the format in the camera. Before you do so, be sure there are no import ants files or pictures on the memory card, because they will be lost.

Jan 01, 2014 | Kodak EasyShare C142 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Can i use other sd cards higher than 32MB


What make and model camera?

SD cards only go up to 2GB. SDHC cards go from 4GB to 32GB. SDXC cards begin at 64GB and go up. If a camera was not specifically designed to work with a particular card type, it will only work with lower types. For example, if the camera was not designed to work with SDXC cards then it will only work with SD and SDHC cards.

Oct 28, 2013 | Canon 32mb Sd Memory Card Sdc-32m

1 Answer

I put in an SD card and it only records to the memory. How do I get it to record to the SD?


Hi Nancy,

I have a couple of generic suggestions. First, make sure the SD card lock tab is in the "unlock" position. When in the lock (or sometimes called "write protect") position, it will not accept data to be saved.

Secondly, check to make sure that the card is a type that is compatible with your camera. If you camera specs an SD card, install and SD card. If it requests and SDHC card, provide and SDHC, and so on. There have been several versions of cards that all LOOK the same: SDSC, SDHC & SDXC. The "SDSC" (Secure Digital Stand Capacity - at introduction was called simply "SD" as it was the only capacity) type has a capacity of 4GB or less. The first devices could not access areas memory in the 4GB + range. Next came the "SDHC" (High Capacity) card. These cards were originally set for 4GB capacity and greater. As the older SD devices faded away, the low end capacity of SDHC cards dropped from 4GB to 1GB or smaller. The SDXC card (eXtended Capacity) and SDIO (Input/Ouput) will supersede the SDHC types as time advances.

Lastly, do not use card types (or those with greater capacities) that do not appear in a compatibility chart for the camera (or any device for that matter). When trouble arises, use only recommended hardware (memory cards) as shown in manuals or online info.

Good luck!

Sep 25, 2013 | Panasonic Sdr-t70 Camcoder,78x Zoom,64gb...

1 Answer

You need to format the disk ....


The drives can be read by another computer, so the problem is most likely with OS/drivers on the HP giving the error. The specific drivers required to read each drive format could be missing/corrupt. Formatting shouldn't be performed on a drive that contains data unless backed up (redundantly). It may be possible to recover any lost data using free recovery software. Often a format preserves data, erases only the file directory.

I would try a system restore on the HP. If that fails to correct it install or upgrade format specific drivers (e.g. SD/SDXC drivers). Contact Magellan about the GPS: you may have formatted the device's system partition. It is unlikely your computer had the correct drivers to format that device, and it is likely formatted in an incompatible format (such as NTFS). Does Magellan provide a utility to read the device's memory? The SD card should be salvageable by formatting on another computer using the appropriate formatting utility. (Go to https://www.sdcard.org and navigate to their formatting utility.)

From that site: "If an SDXC memory card is used through the direct SD slot of a computer without SDXC driver installation, the card may not be recognized correctly and a message to prompt formatting may appear. In this case, do not format the SDXC memory card. It may erase the data on the SDXC memory card and format the card for a different file system, making it incompatible with SDXC devices."

Aug 24, 2013 | HP G60-235DX Notebook

1 Answer

What kind of memory card does it take


koolmomof2:
From the user manual (click here for manual) on page 2, it states:

"This camera is compatible with SD memory cards, SDHC memory cards and SDXC memory cards."

So, and memory card that displays any one of these three types will work with your camera.

Here are some examples of SDXC memory cards being sold over the Internet: (click here)

Thanks for using FixYa

Feb 20, 2011 | Canon EOS 550D Rebel T2i Digital Camera

1 Answer

I took pictures and recorded video on a (PNY OPTIM SD HC [60 HD] ) Memory Card that a friend gave to me. and it recorded fine on my camera. I use a Nikon Coolpix, but yet nothing is reading the card. I...


It could be that the devices into which you inserted the SD card are not designed to accept SD cards of that type.
There are 3 SD card types: SD, SDHC and SDXC. If the SD card size is 4GB to 32GB, the type is SDHC, and if the card is larger than 32GB, it is an SDXC type.
Newer devices will accept SDHC and SDXC cards, but older devices may not be able to read those SD card types. You should be able to check the specifications of the devices you are using by looking on the device manufacturer's web site.

Sep 25, 2017 | PNY 2GB microSD Memory Card

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