Question about Belinea 10 15 70 15" LCD Monitor

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Error Code (german): "Ung?ltiger Modus"

By booting my System I first see a monitor screen saying "no Signal", then the BIOS-Boot-Screen comes up and when Windows XP is starting, there`s another monitor screen saying "ungültiger Modus".
Everest Home Edition gives the following Report about my System:
--------[ EVEREST Home Edition (c) 2003-2005 Lavalys, Inc. ]------------------------------------------------------------ Version EVEREST v2.20.405/de Homepage http://www.lavalys.com/ Berichtsart Berichts-Assistent Computer BUNDD Ersteller Admin Betriebssystem Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition 5.1.2600 (WinXP Retail) Datum 2009-01-18 Zeit 16:54 --------[ übersicht ]--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Computer: Betriebssystem Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition OS Service Pack Service Pack 3 DirectX 4.09.00.0904 (DirectX 9.0c) Computername BUNDD Benutzername Admin Motherboard: CPU Typ DualCore AMD Athlon 64 X2, 2000 MHz (10 x 200) 3800+ Motherboard Name Asus A8NE-FM (3 PCI, 1 PCI-E x16, 2 DDR DIMM, Audio, LAN, IEEE-1394) Motherboard Chipsatz nVIDIA nForce4-4X, AMD Hammer Arbeitsspeicher 2048 MB (PC3200 DDR SDRAM) BIOS Typ Award (09/15/05) Anschlüsse (COM und LPT) Kommunikationsanschluss (COM1) Anschlüsse (COM und LPT) Druckeranschluss (LPT1) Anzeige: Grafikkarte NVIDIA GeForce 6600 (256 MB) 3D-Beschleuniger nVIDIA GeForce 6600 PCI-E Monitor Maxdata Belinea 10 15 70 [15" LCD] (141116843009) Multimedia: Soundkarte C-Media CMI8738 Audio Chip Datenträger: IDE Controller NVIDIA nForce4 Parallel ATA Controller IDE Controller NVIDIA nForce4 Serial ATA Controller IDE Controller NVIDIA nForce4 Serial ATA Controller Festplatte SAMSUNG SP2504C (250 GB, 7200 RPM, SATA-II) Festplatte GENERIC USB Storage-SMC USB Device Festplatte GENERIC USB Storage-SDC USB Device Festplatte Verbatim STORE N GO USB Device (3 GB, USB) Festplatte GENERIC USB Storage-MSC USB Device Festplatte GENERIC USB Storage-CFC USB Device Festplatte Generic External USB Device (149 GB, USB) Optisches Laufwerk HL-DT-ST DVDRRW GWA-4164B Optisches Laufwerk SONY DVD RW DRU-190A S.M.A.R.T. Festplatten-Status OK Partitionen: C: (NTFS) 238464 MB (225581 MB frei) F: (NTFS) 152625 MB (73145 MB frei) Speicherkapazität 381.9 GB (291.7 GB frei) Eingabegeräte: Tastatur Standardtastatur (101/102 Tasten) oder Microsoft Natural Keyboard (PS/2) Maus HID-konforme Maus Netzwerk: Netzwerkkarte NVIDIA nForce Networking Controller - Paketplaner-Miniport (192.168.178.20) Peripheriegeräte: Drucker hp LaserJet 1015 Drucker Microsoft XPS Document Writer USB1 Controller nVIDIA MCP04 - OHCI USB Controller USB2 Controller nVIDIA MCP04 - EHCI USB 2.0 Controller USB-Geräte hp LaserJet 1015 (DOT4) USB-Geräte USB-HID (Human Interface Device) USB-Geräte USB-Massenspeichergerät USB-Geräte USB-Massenspeichergerät USB-Geräte USB-Massenspeichergerät

Can you help me and explain what "ungültiger Modus" means or how I can stop my System from lots of Rebootings that it does by itself?

Sorry for my English is not the very best.
And thank you for whatever you dou to help me

Posted by on

  • Roberta Smith
    Roberta Smith May 11, 2010

    ungültiger Modus translates from german to english as invalid mode. could possibly be a driver issue... have you rebooted to safe mode and tried it ?.... taping the f8 key the choose safe mode



    Robert

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Hardware problem call some vendor....

Posted on Jul 17, 2009

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Tell me aboout boot sequence in bios setup


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If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

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What happens inside the PC between turning the power on and you see the desktop on the screen?


  1. The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.
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  3. The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  4. The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
  5. The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
  6. The BIOS displays its startup screen.
  7. The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  8. The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
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  10. The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
  11. The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
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