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Audio technica at 4040 constant ground hum noise

I'm getting a constant ground hum noise. how can I trouble shoot this specialized cable. Is it continuity from all ends to ends? Anything else I should pay attention to. Thank you!!!

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  • daniel nadeau Jun 23, 2007

    Once again techman thankyou!! I will test the cable and then start getting into the inside of the mike. It makes perfect sense to me what you suggest and I have should of done so before writing.

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You can test the cable from connection to connection for continuity from end to end. There should be no resistance( a complete short) If the cable is good, there is a bad or broken connection inside the mic. Good Luck

Posted on Jun 23, 2007

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Have Simmons SD9K drum kit. Started having a hum. Tried thru head phone or Mackie board. It still hums. Pulled each cable to drums or cymbals and it still hums. Anyone know what is causing this.


The hum is likely to be the sound of the ac mains electricity, either because the power supply smoothing has become ineffective in the amplifier or one or more of the audio peripherals or because the audio connections to the input of the amplifier have created a hum loop that is picking up the radiated energy from the mains supply and feeding it into the audio input.

Multiple grounding is often the reason for a hum loop. This is where an audio peripheral is not only grounded through the supply cable but is also grounded through the screened audio lead.

If the hum persists when there is no inputs connected the problem is almost certainly power supply related, otherwise it is likely to be a peripheral that has a faulty power supply or the culprit is a hum loop.

Hi-fi officianados have a number of tricks to deal with hum loops and google could lead you to these.

Grounding is an important safety consideration so appliances that are intended to be grounded must continue to be grounded but the loop could be broken by using special audio leads. The usual lead would use the screening as a conductor and so the screen must be connected both to the peripheral and to the amplifier.
A better lead uses an extra core conductor and the screen then becomes just a screen and is grounded only at the amplifier end and is not connected to the peripheral.

I hope this helps.

Sep 10, 2016 | Simmons SD9K Electronic Drum Set

1 Answer

New noise


sounds like a ground issue to me. that sounds like either 60 cycle hum, or a loose or broken ground. You can probably do an ohmmeter check, first, with no power, and see if you have continuity. That's not unusual for mikes of the seniority of your equipment.

Feb 16, 2008 | Sony ECM-HS1 Gun Zoom Microphone

1 Answer

I have extreem amount of noise between my tascam 2488 to computer based recording program , how can I delete the noise ?


What kind of noise is it? If it is hum or buzz, then you probably have a ground loop. If it is hiss, then you are picking up noise in the cable, most likely. For ground loops, see: http://www.audioholics.com/home-theater-connection/ground-loops-eliminating-system-hum-and-buzz

As for the cable, the cheap ones with the red and gray plastic ,olded ends can get noisy after awhile as the shielding is rather fragile. Cracling type noises are usually cable related as well.

Jul 30, 2014 | Tascam 2488 Portastudio Multitrack...

1 Answer

Loud hum from subwoofer


The number-one cause of subwoofer/speaker hum is the coaxial cable connecting your cable or satellite receiver to your provider (either through an inground run to a cable box or through a satellite dish). Here is how you test for this:
  1. Turn your system on and get it to produce the hum by watching a movie. Pause your DVD or videotape so that the hum is all you hear.
    TIPDon't use a normal cable or satellite program for this; you're about to disconnect the cable that provides the audio and video for your cable/satellite feed.
  2. Find the coaxial cable running from your cable or satellite receiver to your service provider, and while listening to the hum, unscrew the connector and disconnect the cable.
Did the hum stop or reduce by a large amount? If so, the cable you disconnected is the source of the noise. If this is the problem, you have several ways to fix the issue permanently (if not, jump ahead to the next section):
  1. Call your cable or satellite company and ask for a service call. Sometimes you get a smart cable guy, and if you demonstrate the problem he can do something upstream to ground the coaxial cable and remove or reduce the hum.
  2. Buy a power strip that has F connectors as part of its surge protection. Plug the strip into the AC outlet and feed your main coaxial signal through these connectors. This ties the shielding of the coax (the source of the noise) to your AC ground and sometimes can solve the problem.
    WARNINGOddly enough, this solution (surge protection) can sometimes increase the humming.
  3. Go to your local RadioShack store and buy three inexpensive items: a Matching Transformer (part #15-1253), an Indoor/Outdoor Matching Transformer (#15-1140), and a Cable Coupler (#278-304). Connect your coaxial cable to the cable coupler, and then to the first matching transformer. The output is two screws for the old two-wire antenna wire. Your indoor/outdoor matching transformer has two connectors for the screws, and the other end is a coaxial connector. Hook your cable or satellite receiver into this connector and see if the hum goes away.
Here is why this trick works: the first transformer converts your 75-ohm coax into a 300-ohm antenna connector. The second transformer converts the 300-ohm back to a 75-ohm connector. The humming, which usually is at around 60 Hz, can't pass through these conversions.

Ground Loop Hum

The second cause of hum is called a ground loop, and it almost always shows up right after you bring home a brand-new, self-powered subwoofer, or perhaps an external amplifier.
Take a look at all the plugs on the power cords on your home theater equipment. In most systems, the receiver (or amplifier) has a three-prong power plug, but most of your other devices have only two-prong plugs. This is not by accident; the device with the three-prong power plug is grounded. This means that device "owns" the ground. As long as no other power device has a three-prong plug, everything works well.
When you bring home a self-powered subwoofer and plug it in, though, you might notice it has a three-prong plug; this is for safety reasons. However, when you connect an RCA cable from your receiver to your subwoofer and turn everything on, you suddenly notice a loud hum.
The external amplifier in your subwoofer is now fighting with the amplifier in your receiver for possession of the ground. Both devices want to define 0.00 volts. But because the wiring in the two amplifiers to your household AC ground is different, one device is really using 0.001 volt and the other device uses something closer to 0.003 volts. The subwoofer cable connects the two, and the fighting begins.
You have to stop these two devices from trying to own the ground, or get them to not "see" each other. First, make your system produce the humming noise. Disconnect the single RCA cable between your receiver and subwoofer. Did the noise stop? If so, you have a ground loop issue.
The proper, safest way to solve this problem is to buy a special subwoofer cable with little arrows on the wire to show the signal direction (see ).
[img src="http://oreilly.com/images/hacks/htheaterhks/figs/htheaterhks_0601.jpg">
Figure 1. Subwoofer cable with directional arrowUnfortunately, many people have been ridiculed when asking about these sorts of cables at their local electronics store: "But cables don't really have a direction. My expert friend at work laughed at me when I asked about this!" Yes, your friend is right. Cables don't have a direction, but these little arrows indicate that this cable will prevent or solve your ground loop problem.
Remember when I said the hum started when you connected the RCA cable? That RCA cable really contains two wires: the center wire and something called the shield. The center wire carries the audio signal, but the shield tries to define 0.00 volts. The shield is the wire that lets the two different components (the receiver or amplifier, and the subwoofer) see each other's ground, and causes the fight. What if you took your subwoofer cable and disconnected the shielding from just one end? Wouldn't that solve the problem? Yes, it would. This is exactly what a subwoofer cable with little arrows does. The shield is not connected at both ends. The shield has to be connected at one end, for connecting to your receiver or amp, so you should run the cable so that the arrows show the flow from the receiver to the subwoofer.
WARNINGIt is unsafe to use a two-prong to three-prong "cheater" plug on the subwoofer power cord to solve the hum problem. Even if the subwoofer came with a cheater plug in the box, it's REALLY not safe to do. Don't do it.

Sep 01, 2013 | Denon Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

I hear a humming noise from my Sunfire subwoofer - occassionally. I bought a kit from Radio Shack that supposed to cut down on noise from the electric outlet - it didn't work. Please help!


How to isolate annoying background hum.

As long as the music or movie is playing, you can forget about it, at least until a quiet passage occurs, then there it is again: HUMMMMMMM! Be gone, bad hum, you think. But, like a bad odor at the back of the fridge, it takes some dogged persistence to track it down and eliminate it.

Hum is a constant low-frequency buzz, usually at about 60 Hz or 120 Hz, which results from voltage differences between true "ground" (what you'd get shoving a copper pipe into the ground) and the electrical "ground" of your receiver's chassis, the incoming cable-TV feed, or any video or audio components interconnected within your system, including powered subwoofers. When this voltage differential exists, it's called a "ground loop," and the hum it produces is darned annoying. You'll hear the hum mainly from the subwoofer because it's a low-frequency noise, but there will also be hum from your floorstanding front speakers or even compact bookshelf models.

First, try disconnecting your subwoofer from the coaxial sub cable from your AV receiver but leave the subwoofer turned on. Does the hum go away? If it does, then the ground loop is entering the system from your AV receiver and/or your cable-TV system set-top box (or satellite dish and decoder).

Disconnect the incoming TV-cable or satellite feed to a set-top box or to your TV and the A/V receiver. If the hum disappears (and you don't use a satellite dish) complain to the cable-TV company. They may know what you need and supply you with a ground-isolating transformer. If they don't know what you are talking about you'll need to order a video ground isolator and install it in-line with the TV cable before it enters your set-top cable-TV box. Axiom has special wide-band isolation transformers that will not interfere with any digital TV or HDTV signal. (N.B. You CANNOT use one of these with a satellite decoder box.)

Before you order one, you can try plugging your subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, ideally one that is not on the same circuit as your AV receiver and video equipment (TV, DVD player, sat or cable TV box, etc.) That may solve the problem. If it doesn't, see if the back panel of your sub has a "ground-lift screw". It will be labeled as such. Just remove it. That may remove the hum. If it doesn't and you have a standard cable-TV feed (not a dish), then order the ground-isolation transformer. (Axiom has special wide-band isolation transformers that will not interfere with any digital TV or HDTV signal.)
Axiom Audio Ground Isolator

If that still doesn't eliminate the hum, or if you use a satellite dish video feed, then you could try one of these from Radio Shack, which goes between the subwoofer and the coaxial cable from the receiver's subwoofer output.

With persistence, all ground-loop problems can be solved.

Hope it helped..

Have a nice day...

Feb 21, 2011 | Sunfire True Sub MK II Subwoofer

1 Answer

Speaker makes a rather loud humming noise.


You can go buy a audioquest SUB-X subwoofer cable with a additional ground wire on it an connect the ground cable to the ground slot of the receiver an the other end to a screw on the sub or into one of the high output terminals on the woofer if it has them an this will take that humming sound right away but the cable is around $90

Mar 28, 2010 | Velodyne HGS-10 Subwoofer

2 Answers

Generates buzzing noise even when only cable is connected to it. No cable - no noise.


If you are saying that you are plugging a guitar cord into an input on an amp without the guitar on the other end and you are getting a hum or buzz with the volume turned up ; that is normal. If you are getting the same results with a guitar plugged in it means the ground wire to your output jack on your guitar is broken. Check your cord with a volt ohm meter for continuity on the tip on one end to the tip on the other end. Do this for the sleeve on one end to the other. If you were getting the buzz without a cable it would mean that your input jack in your amp has a broken ground connection. Hope this helps.

Jul 04, 2009 | Fender Frontman 65R 65W 1x12 Guitar Combo...

2 Answers

Subwoofer probelm


I suspect you have a bad cable, a poor ground or a bad
power supply inside the speaker amplifier. The amplifier
(inside the sub-woofer) could also be defective.
===
1) Bad cable or connector:
If the (braided shield/outer tube) of the coaxial input cable is
not grounded, the cable will pickup line frequency "hum"
from surrounding power lines, house wires, lights and
appliances.

This hum is then amplified by the speaker's amplifier
causing the constant bass sound you speak of.

Because the hum frequency fundamental is 60 Hertz in
North America, 50 Hertz in Europe, you hear it coming
mostly out of the sub-woofer, because the midrange and
high speaker circuits filter it out.

Check the input connectors, cable at both ends, wiggle
the jacks at a low volume setting to see if it changes.

Make sure that you are indeed using a properly shielded
coaxial cable.

A coaxial cable consists of a thin inner conductor, surrounded
by a flexible tube made up of a braided metal shield, which
must be grounded. This prevents hum from being picked up
by the sensitive amplifier inputs.
===

2) If the power supply within the sub-woofer's internal amplifier
is defective, the the power supply hum will also get coupled
into the amplifier and speaker with same results as above.

Power supply hum is typically twice the line frequency,
i.e. 120 Hertz, but not always, depending on what
component failed: Rectifier diode, filter capacitor, or
the voltage regulator.

3) Ground loops:
When you run very long cables between the source and
destination of an audio signal, multiple ground paths (must)
exist between the two points in space, creating complete
loop circuits.

Power line hum from the environment can (will) induce
heavy AC currents around these loops, creating a voltage
gradient across these cables, and in-between the end
devices.

Once again, this AC hum is coupled into the amplifier inputs.

Ground loops become a problem with cables over 10
feet long, and an astronomical problem for stage audio
engineers. To avoid ground loops, they must break
the circuit's continuity by using isolation transformers,
optical isolators, and/or differential input amplifiers.

So how long are your cables?

Most house stereo components are only designed to
handle 6 to 10 feet of cabling max.

30 feet is already asking for major trouble.

4) Feed back oscillation: This occurs when the output of
an amplifier is fed back to the inputs with a round trip
gain greater or equal to unity. The tiniest little electrical
disturbance is then amplified and re-amplified, over and
over again, usually at one preferred frequency, causing
the typical (ear-splitting) microphone squeal or howl.

In your situation feedback and/ loss of original signal
could be the result of mis-wiring the input cables.

Note that this is NOT as silly nor as unlikely as it sounds,
because many computer audio cards and even some
home stereo systems have re-configurable inputs and
outputs.

SOFTWARE configuration decides which jack at the
back does what !!!!

On my computer, for example, the Realtek audio driver
tries to automatically figure out what cable is connected
to each jack (usually it gets it wrong)

Using the Realtek control panel applet, I can then
manually re-configure the gray jack as input,
the green jack as bass, pink jack as center.... etc.

If this situation also applies to your system, please check
the software configuration. Connecting an output cable to
an input jack will certainly cause a lot of HUM and not
much music.

5) Finally, don't rule out internal sub-woofer failure. Unlike
the passive stereo/hi-fi speakers of days gone by, modern
multi-channel theater systems with front, center, rear and
sub-woofer speakers are internally amplified, with active
frequency cross-over filters and special effect/ surround
sound capabilities.

Usually, the large sub-woofer contains most of the
electronics, amplifiers and filters.

It feeds the other speakers, and it is controlled by
an external volume control module which can be separate
or built into one of the tweeters.

These sub-woofer electronics are prone to poor design,
overheating and early failure. (Even fresh out of the box
like yours)

If you cannot get it working, take it back to the store,
and make the NICE salesmen **** with it.

Good luck
Please rate my answers
Martin.

Jul 20, 2008 | Yamaha 5.1-Ch. Surround Sound Home Theater...

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