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Chaika mechanical watch stopped working after I reset the time. How to start it again without over-winding?

It's a pendant watch from the soviet era. I wound it this morning, it started ticking, then when I set the time it stopped. I gave it a tiny wind to see if that would start it again but no luck. I don't know if I over wound it or what. Any help would be appreciated!

Posted by Anonymous on

  • Anonymous Jan 01, 2013

    It's not an automatic -- it's one that needs to be wound by hand. Is there anything else I can try besides tapping it?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Omega constellation self winding watch stops

Omega claim that your watch will run for 40 or more hours, so stopping overnight should not happen. I doubt if you need to be particularly active to wind up the watch, otherwise this would make the problem quite common. My one experience of owning an automatic did not raise this sort of problem.

Discuss your problem with your supplier and describe your use. As you correctly say, having to hand wind i defeats the point of buying an autoamtic. (It could be that you have been sold two duff watches, however unlikely this may seem, it could happen).

Posted on Jun 06, 2010

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SOURCE: I have a Tag Heuer

If your watch is "automatic" then would I be right in thinking you took it off for a few days and it stopped?

If this is the case (since most of the Carrera range are automatic, then the spring will have run down and needs re-winding.

You were correct in thinking that shaking it will re- start it but to keep it going you need to shake it gently from side to side for some time. (One supplier quoted 500 times!) be patient and keep wearing it.

Posted on Oct 14, 2010

  • 8 Answers

SOURCE: Watch will not wind. Wound

The best solution is to lightly tap on the watch, this will keep it running until the spring is unwound enough to run on it's own.

Posted on Jan 08, 2011

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: I recently bought an invicata

It looks like your watch has mechanical issue. Without inspecting the watch it's hard to say what exactly the problem is and I suggest you return it for replacement under warranty.

Posted on Apr 15, 2011

  • 910 Answers

SOURCE: I just received a Welby

These clock do need oiling every couple of years and should be cleaned at least every 10 years.

One of the winding holes is for the time, one is for the strike and the 3rd is for the chime. These do vary in location from clock to clock so I can't advise any further. It sounds like this clock has 2 differenct chimes depicted by the SIE & EIV7.

I think your best option is to take it to a clock shop and get it cleaned. They should then be able to give you more information on the chimes and its operation.

Posted on May 30, 2011

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Hi i just bought a "the cannon" watch from west 49 and i don't know how to get the watch to actually start. i set the time on it but it won't start ticking. i'm wondering if it's...


Hi alec,

I see that you cannon watch is not ticking even after you have set the time.

Well after you set the time you push the knob back in once the time is set right then the watch should start ticking that instant.

If the watch is not ticking at all then it is either a damaged watch or the watch sold to you may not have batteries on it.

can you give me a model and info regarding the watch maybe we can get information or a manual about the watch for further checking before considering it to be broken.

Also if you can try calling or going back to where you purchased the watch maybe they give you details on why it will not click since you just bought it I believe they will assist you if it may need replacing.

I hope that this helps.

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I have wound muy omega speedmaster automatic to tightly at the bezel and it has stopped working. Can you tell me if there is something inside that can be released tostart it again?


There's a misconception that mechanical watches can be "overwound." Mainsprings in old watches can indeed set in place and freeze up if they are wound tightly and not permitted to unwind, but the steel used in modern mainsprings used in the past 50 years or so is an alloy that's much less likely to bind up compared to 19th century pocket watches. In addition, the winding mechanism in an automatic (aka, self-winding) watch is designed to slip once the spring has been fully wound so that the rotor and winding parts aren't damaged by suddenly binding up. In a manual wind watch, once the mainspring is fully wound, it's simply not possible to wind the watch further unless the mainspring snaps or comes loose from its anchoring--in which case, you'd be able to wind the watch forever without ever storing power in the mainspring to drive the movement. While it is possible for a watchmaker to open your watch and release tension on the mainspring, it's overwhelmingly likely that something entirely different is keeping your watch from ticking and keeping time.

Mechanical watches generally stop running for two reasons: (1) lack of power to the movement; or (2) something in the movement that is preventing the movement from running. If your mainspring is fully wound, you have power to drive the movement. It's time to think about what could be causing #2.

Problems in the movement are usually caused by dust or dirt that preventing a delicate movement part from working properly (e.g., dirt at the pivots can freeze up a gear, stopping a movement). However, it's also possible to have a mechanical failure, such as a bent tooth on a gear in the train. A further possibility is so-called "overbanking," which some believe is the origin of the myth of overwinding. A mechanical watch's balance assembly drives a tiny little forked lever back and forth to control the escapement and the rate at which the watch keeps time. If the watch receives a physical shock or if the parts are worn, it's possible for this tiny lever to get bumped out of its tiny pivot and jammed in place. When that happens, the watch will stop, even though a superficial check will seem to indicate that the balance is still moving freely. At the same time, because the watch isn't ticking, the mainspring isn't unwinding, and so the watch cannot be wound further.

In my experience, watches usually stop running due to dirt at the pivots or on one or more gear teeth. I generally see overbanking in older watches or mechanical watches that have been less precisely made and not routinely cleaned over their working lives--though I have seen it also occur in a few newer watches that were dropped. Better designed watches--and I would include Omega in this category--have escapement levers with built-in guards to make it more difficult for them to overbank.

As for how dirt gets into a watch that's supposed to be water-resistant and generally sealed against exactly that problem--well, as odd as it sounds, watches "breathe," and this process draws in dust and dirt over time. Worn against the body, a watch warms up and expands the air inside it, pushing some of it out of the case; upon cooling, some air is drawn back into the case. This process is obviously reduced in watches designed with a significant degree of water resistance (aka 50 meters or more), but the process is accelerated when you pull the stem out to set the time or even wind the watch via the stem--there's some degree of air gap between the stem and the stem tube, or else it wouldn't be possible to turn the stem. This microscopic dust--in minute quantities--mixes with the lubricating oils inside a mechanical watch and increase the friction in some of the key pivots. Over time, the combination of naturally solidifying oils that are thickening and a minute amount of dust can turn lubricating oil into glue. The watch cleaning process flushes the old oil and accumulated dirt from the pivot bushings so that fresh, uncontaminated oil can be used to re-lubricate these key gear axles.

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I haven't worn my fossil watch (FS 4337 model) for some time & decide to wear it & shook it, adjust it, & it dosn't work. Usually when I don't wear it for about 2 weeks, I shake it...


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