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Problem with ground wire on Kenmore Ultra Wash

No power when ground wire is connected to appliance frame

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

markevans
  • 148 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore Ultra Wash Dishwasher wiring diagram

if unavailable on line, contact mfg's parts and you should be able to order it.
also, they likely do not make the unit. the sears may be able to tell you who made it. that company would be able to get you a diagram. just make some phone calls.

Posted on Dec 21, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Kenmore Elite Ultra Wash Dishwasher - top rack arm not spinning

Hi: I just posted a similar problem, but found a solution. After taking the arm, etc. apart (and verifying no blockages), I thought maybe the lack of water pressure was being caused by the fact that there are TWO holes for the top spray arm (higher and lower rack setting) on my model. ie. that water was being forced out of both holes, causing a drop in water pressure, which was causing the top spray arm to stop spinning. I plugged the unused hole with a wine bottle cork (to keep the water from spraying out the unused hole), and voila, it now works.

I wish all appliance fixes were this easy...!

S

Posted on Apr 21, 2009

  • 83 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore Ultra Wash dishwasher

check and see if you are getting ac 110 volts to your water vave when trying to start the unit. if no power check your breakers and /or the incoming power to your dishwasher if they are ok and show 110 voltage coming to the unit then you probably have a control board or touchpad problem which would need a little more detailed check out.
If you do have ac 110 to your water valve then you may just have a bad water valve. Because the washer has to fill first. Hope that helps!!

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

RED92JEEPER
  • 51 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore Ultra Wash Dishwasher - no lights, won't reset

check wire nuts that were used to install power cord/it is on the right hand side of toe kick if ok there is a fuse on the control that you can replace located top of door

Posted on Sep 27, 2009

  • 523 Answers

SOURCE: My Kenmore Ultra Wash Quiet Guard

take kick plate off get book out how to reset board

Posted on Apr 24, 2010

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Need to change the power corrd to a 4 prong from the 3 prong but the 3 prong cable isnt color coordinated, how do I hook up the new power cord?


The new cord has a green ground wire; two hot wires, which are black and red; and a white neutral wire. Attach the neutral to the middle connector and the two hot wires to either end of the terminal.
In order to safely ground the machine the green ground wire must be securely connected to the dryer frame. There may be a screw on the frame where you can attach the ground.

Jun 24, 2011 | Kenmore 62622 Electric Dryer

Tip

Installing a 220 VAC Appliance Cord


This advice is on how to correctly install an ELECTRIC DRYER or ELECTRIC RANGE 220-240VAC power cord (US Standards).

3-Prong or 4-Prong – The Difference:

3-prong color code:

BLACK (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L1
RED (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L2
WHITE (NEUTRAL – 0VAC) – Usually grounded to the equipment frame via a jumper wire or metal strap.

4-prong color code:

BLACK (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L1
RED (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L2
WHITE (NEUTRAL – 0VAC) – DO NOT ground to equipment frame.
GREEN (GROUND) – Attach to equipment frame.

Which One to Use: According to the National Electrical Code (NEC), Article 250, installations after the year 2000, require the use of a 4-prong plug which incorporates a separate ground and neutral wire. If you currently have a home that uses the 3-prong receptacle and cord, you can continue to use it. You will have to upgrade to a 4-prong configuration, however, if you plan on relocating your current receptacle, or if the internal wires of the receptacle become damaged in any way and require repair.

Converting from 3-prong to 4-prong: Make sure you UNPLUG the appliance prior to any repairs. CAUTION: Voltages dangerous to life are still present even with the appliance turned off and still plugged in. Notably in the area of the terminal block where the power cords are installed. You will need to remove the old cord by following these steps:

  1. With the appliance UNPLUGGED, remove the access panel on the back of the unit where the power cord enters.
  2. With the cover removed, you will see a terminal block where the power cord is attached. The terminal wires will be colored with the WHITE wire in the middle, and the BLACK and RED wires on either end. NOTE: There should be a green jumper wire or metal bonding strap attached to the NEUTRAL (white) terminal wire.
  3. Remove the terminal lugs holding the old power cord wires in place. CAUTION: Use care not to drop any nuts or screws inside the appliance.
  4. Remove the bonding strap or ground wire from the Neutral terminal lug. NOTE: If disconnecting a ground wire, make sure you re-attach it to the appliance frame.
  5. Loosen the screws on the strain relief connector that holds the power cord in place and remove old power cord. NOTE: If your appliance does not have a strain relief that clamps down and hold the power cord in place, it is highly recommended that you install one. This prevents chaffing of the power cord against the appliance casing, and prevents the terminal wires from being pulled and broken loose. This could pose a potential shock hazard or cause damage to the appliance.
  6. Install new power cord by threading it through the strain relief connector and tighten down the screws.
  7. Connect the new power cord to the corresponding colors at the terminal block (Black goes to Black, Red goes to Red, White goes to White). The difference is going to be a Green (ground) wire that will connect to the appliance frame. There’s usually a green grounding screw for this. NOTE: If you disconnected a green grounding strap in Step 4., you can connect these two wires at the same point.
  8. Re-install access cover. Turn off the service breaker to the appliance PRIOR to plugging it back in. With the breaker in the off position, plug the appliance in, and THEN turn the breaker on. In the event, something was wired incorrectly, it is far better to have your hands away from the receptacle and controlled from a distance. Safety first.
These steps will work for nearly all appliances that require a 220-240VAC power cord conversion. The power cords are usually rated at 250VAC, 30 amps, and are carried by any hardware store or appliance parts retailer.

ADDITIONAL NOTES:

  1. If you desire to convert an appliance from a 4-prong to a 3-prong, make sure you reconnect the bonding strap and/or ground wire to the Neutral (white) wire at the terminal block.
  2. On some newer appliances, it is REQUIRED that you use a 4-prong plug in order for the timer or clock circuits to function properly due to the way they are configured. Refer to your owner’s manual for the correct recommendation. Even if you currently have a 3-prong receptacle, you still may be required to upgrade to a 4-prong if you encounter this situation.
  3. In many circumstances, new appliances are NOT sold with the power cord due to the various power configurations in homes. Always refer to the contents description on the shipping container the appliance comes with to see what additional items or tools may be required for installation.
I hope this information is found to be helpful.

on Dec 04, 2009 | Dryers

Tip

3-prong to 4-prong Power Cord Conversion.


This advice is on how to correctly install an ELECTRIC DRYER or ELECTRIC RANGE 220-240VAC power cord (US Standards).

3-Prong or 4-Prong – The Difference:

3-prong color code:

BLACK (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L1
RED (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L2
WHITE (NEUTRAL – 0VAC) – Usually grounded to the equipment frame via a jumper wire or metal strap.

4-prong color code:

BLACK (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L1
RED (HOT – 110-120VAC) – May also be referred to as L2
WHITE (NEUTRAL – 0VAC) – DO NOT ground to equipment frame.
GREEN (GROUND) – Attach to equipment frame.

Which One to Use: According to the National Electrical Code (NEC), Article 250, installations after the year 2000, require the use of a 4-prong plug which incorporates a separate ground and neutral wire. If you currently have a home that uses the 3-prong receptacle and cord, you can continue to use it. You will have to upgrade to a 4-prong configuration, however, if you plan on relocating your current receptacle, or if the internal wires of the receptacle become damaged in any way and require repair.

Converting from 3-prong to 4-prong: Make sure you UNPLUG the appliance prior to any repairs. CAUTION: Voltages dangerous to life are still present even with the appliance turned off and still plugged in. Notably in the area of the terminal block where the power cords are installed. You will need to remove the old cord by following these steps:

  1. With the appliance UNPLUGGED, remove the access panel on the back of the unit where the power cord enters.
  2. With the cover removed, you will see a terminal block where the power cord is attached. The terminal wires will be colored with the WHITE wire in the middle, and the BLACK and RED wires on either end. NOTE: There should be a green jumper wire or metal bonding strap attached to the NEUTRAL (white) terminal wire.
  3. Remove the terminal lugs holding the old power cord wires in place. CAUTION: Use care not to drop any nuts or screws inside the appliance.
  4. Remove the bonding strap or ground wire from the Neutral terminal lug. NOTE: If disconnecting a ground wire, make sure you re-attach it to the appliance frame.
  5. Loosen the screws on the strain relief connector that holds the power cord in place and remove old power cord. NOTE: If your appliance does not have a strain relief that clamps down and hold the power cord in place, it is highly recommended that you install one. This prevents chaffing of the power cord against the appliance casing, and prevents the terminal wires from being pulled and broken loose. This could pose a potential shock hazard or cause damage to the appliance.
  6. Install new power cord by threading it through the strain relief connector and tighten down the screws.
  7. Connect the new power cord to the corresponding colors at the terminal block (Black goes to Black, Red goes to Red, White goes to White). The difference is going to be a Green (ground) wire that will connect to the appliance frame. There’s usually a green grounding screw for this. NOTE: If you disconnected a green grounding strap in Step 4., you can connect these two wires at the same point.
  8. Re-install access cover. Turn off the service breaker to the appliance PRIOR to plugging it back in. With the breaker in the off position, plug the appliance in, and THEN turn the breaker on. In the event, something was wired incorrectly, it is far better to have your hands away from the receptacle and controlled from a distance. Safety first.

on Jul 16, 2008 | Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

2 Answers

We were given a HOT POINT Heavy Duty Dryer with Automatic Dry Control, Model DLB2650BRLWH, Serial No. DG241274H and had to buy the power cord to go with it. Ordered the cord from a local appliance company,...


Technical explanation: Older 240 Volt appliances use a three-wire power cord (Black, White, Red). The White wire is the "neutral" connection, which is tied to Ground at the service entrance panel. The Black and Red wires are opposite phases of the 240 VAC (when one goes positive, the other goes negative). The neutral wire is "in between", so measuring the voltage between the black or red wire and neutral would give you 120 VAC. The green wire is frame ground; the electrical code requires newer (since 2008) 240 VAC appliances to have a separate ground bonding connection to the frame; the neutral connection is not considered adequate protection for certain failure conditions.

Look for a screw head or terminal stud on the frame or sheet metal of the dryer labeled "Ground", "Earth", or one of the following ground symbols:
kato_tech.jpg kato_tech_0.jpg kato_tech_1.jpg

The green wire goes to this point. DO NOT connect the green wire to any of the wiring inside the dryer, unless it is a green wire attached to sheet metal or a bracket!

The black, white and red wires go to black, white and red terminals you already found.

Mar 17, 2011 | Hotpoint Dryers

1 Answer

My kenmore series 80 washer will fill up and wash but it stops when it gets to the spin cycle. I have to empty the water by hand. Any ideas about why my washer will be appreciated.


Your washer uses a lid switch which kills power to the motor if you open the lid while it is in spin. These lid switches fail. They have 3 wires. One green wire that bolts to frame for earth ground and 2 live wires. Touch them two live wires together and it will effectively bypass the lid switch where you can wash clothes but it would be dangerous to children.

Manual and more repair photos click here

Let me know

Jun 10, 2010 | Kenmore 24032\24036 Top Load Washer

2 Answers

Where does ground wire go


Hi there, If you can give me a little more information, I'd appreciate it. However, I'm going to give it my best shot to see if I can answer what I believe you're looking for. If you're talking about the outlet (receptacle) that you're plugging your appliance into, then the ground (green) wire, or screw on the bottom of the outlet is where you want to connect your third (ground) wire to. If you just have two wires coming off your outlet (receptacle) and can't find the third wire. Then you'd ground or connect a wire to the inside of the box, and then tie with the ground (green) wire coming from the green ground screw on the outlet (receptacle). The problem with house wiring is, a majority of your older houses outlets aren't grounded. If you have a 3-prong outlet, then maybe yours is. But sometimes, people just change these out for convenience purposes. And lastly, if you're talking about the grounded wire in your appliance - look for a green (ground) screw, otherwise you want to connect this to (or around) a metal screw on the inner frame. A majority of your old appliances were never grounded. So bottom line is; your appliance should work with, or without your ground wire. It would be preferable if it was grounded. But for operating purposes, its not. I hope I was able to answer your question for you. If not, feel free to contact me again. Good Luck, Jim

May 21, 2010 | Hobart Food Mixers

1 Answer

1990 HD FLHTCU ElectraGlide no power


On most electraglides, there is what we call an accessories wire at the battery positive post or the starter terminal where the postitive battery cable connects. This is usually a red wire of larger gauge and goes directly to the main circuit breaker. From there, it goes to the switch. Start at the copper terminal of your main circuit breaker and work backwards if you are not getting any power anywhere as you state.

Also check your ground to the negative side of the battery. Without a good ground, you won't get any power. If you have a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) check from the ground lug on the frame to the engine. Sometimes if your repaint or powder coat your frame, you lose the grounding from the engine to the frame. Make sure all your grounds are good. Hope this helps, Good Luck, Steve

May 03, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Going from thre prong to four prong what goes


Under the new Codes2_bing.gif...all dryers (and stoves/ovens) must now be 4 wire....having a seperate neutral and ground wire in NEW construction. In decades past, the neutral was allowed to serve as both - the neutral and ground - typically by means of a solid metal strap or wire strap that bonded that connection to the metal frame of the dryer. This sounds as if it is the case in your existing dryer...which was typical.

But...the old arrangement wasn't always reliable...and a seperate dedicated ground provides a greater safety path in the event of a fault inside the dryer (lowering the chance the user may get a shock when touching the frame of the dryer).

To modify your existing 3 prong dryer over to 4....you'll need to remove the 3 wire - disconnect the ground strap (or wire) that bonds the neutral to the frame of the dryer...and install your 4 wire so that you'll have (from left to right) one hot, one neutral, one hot connection...and connect the ground directly to he frame of the dryer (there is usually a green screw near the dryer connection block for this ground)

For more on this - with an illustration, see:

http://www.american-appliance.com/service_pages/electric_dryer_cord.htm

When done properly, you can test for correct wiring and connection with an ohm-meter (continuity check)...by checking for continuity from the ground prong on the plug to the frame of the dryer...you should see continuity. Then check for continuity from the neutral prong on the plug to the frame...you should NOT see continuity....nor should you see any continuity between the neutral connection at the wiring block to the metal frame.

The whole purpose of the Code change to the 4 wire is to seperate the two.

Hope this helps,....if you need more details, please follow-up.

May 02, 2010 | Speed Queen AES28AWF Electric Dryer

1 Answer

How to change a 3 wire to 4 wire on a dryer


Under the new Codes...all dryers (and stoves/ovens) must now be 4 wire....having a seperate neutral and ground wire in NEW construction. In decades past, the neutral was allowed to serve as both - the neutral and ground - typically by means of a solid metal strap or wire strap that bonded that connection to the metal frame of the dryer. This sounds as if it is the case in your existing dryer...which was typical.

But...the old arrangement wasn't always reliable...and a seperate dedicated ground provides a greater safety path in the event of a fault inside the dryer (lowering the chance the user may get a shock when touching the frame of the dryer).

To modify your existing 3 prong dryer over to 4....you'll need to remove the 3 wire - disconnect the ground strap (or wire) that bonds the neutral to the frame of the dryer...and install your 4 wire so that you'll have (from left to right) one hot, one neutral, one hot connection...and connect the ground directly to he frame of the dryer (there is usually a green screw near the dryer connection block for this ground)

For more on this - with an illustration, see:

http://www.american-appliance.com/service_pages/electric_dryer_cord.htm

When done properly, you can test for correct wiring and connection with an ohm-meter (continuity check)...by checking for continuity from the ground prong on the plug to the frame of the dryer...you should see continuity. Then check for continuity from the neutral prong on the plug to the frame...you should NOT see continuity....nor should you see any continuity between the neutral connection at the wiring block to the metal frame.

The whole purpose of the Code change to the 4 wire is to seperate the two.

Hope this helps,....if you need more details, please follow-up.

Apr 27, 2010 | Whirlpool ET8CHEXSQ Dryer

2 Answers

I NEED HELP CHANGING CORD TO A 4 PRONG ASAP!!THANKS


These two pictures illustrate the power wiring on a the terminal of an electric dryer. The one to the left here is the old-style three-wire configuration. Most people have this type in their homes. New code changes, though, require that dryers now have a four-wire cord, shown to the right. These are just just thumbnail pictures that you can click for a larger view. But I'll bet you already figured that out, didn't you?
Besides the number of wires in each cord, there are two important things to notice. First, in the four-wire configuration, notice that the dryer's grounding strap is folded back on itself. The whole point of the four-wire cord is to separate the ground from the neutral. The green wire (the "new" extra wire in the four-wire cord) is attached to the dryer cabinet. In the three-wire configuration, the grounding strap is left intact and the neutral and ground are tied together.
tn_3prong_dryer_outlet.jpgtn_4prong_dryer_outlet.jpgIf you need to re-wire the outlet, these pictures will explain the anatomy of the three-prong (left) and four-prong (right) outlets. Once again, these pictures are just thumbnails--click 'em for a larger view.

Sure hope this helps you find a resolution to your delimma! Best wishes.

Comments: Jul 23, 2009- bf71290.jpgfb4d3ed.jpg

Three wire Four wire.


Better? Best wishes and sorry about the pics. Hope this is better.

Aug 17, 2009 | Frigidaire GLEQ2152ES Electric Dryer

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