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Heat coils in central air conditioning unit look fine under examination, checked with an ohmmeter both coils showed continuity. Power at both coils indicated 110 volts. Unit fan runs fine but there is no heat at ducts. 15 amp fuse in the circuit board reads 15 amps Main 220 volt breaker for A/C unit works fine

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No heat coming from my central air unit when i cut the heat on. Just cool air. what should i do.

Posted on Feb 25, 2009

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Are you getting 120 vac or 220 vac at the unit? Check the voltage at the first terminals inside the unit as well as the breaker. You should have 220 vac at the elements and you are dropping a leg some where.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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LG lw1810hr window unit heat not working


Check to see if there's power to the reversing valve, if there is, try tapping it slightly with something kind of soft. You should give the reversing valve solenoid a continuity check with an ohmmeter to see if it's open or shorted.

Dec 07, 2013 | LG Heat cool Window Air Conditioner

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Boiler doesn't fire up. 25 years old Amana outdoor boiler model #3612M-A Mfg # P68191-1F,It had leak in pump housing and replaced, replaced igniter ,but no fire, no leak in system ,pump are keep running...





How a Central Air Conditioning System Works
amn_howac.jpg


Facts:
  • The typical central air conditioning system is a split system, with an outdoor air conditioning, or "compressor bearing unit" and an indoor coil, which is usually installed on top of the furnace in the home.
  • Using electricity as its power source, the compressor pumps refrigerant through the system to gather heat and moisture from indoors and remove it from the home.
  • Heat and moisture are removed from the home when warm air from inside the home is blown over the cooled indoor coil. The heat in the air transfers to the coil, thereby "cooling" the air.
  • The heat that has transferred to the coil is then "pumped" to the exterior of the home, while the cooled air is pumped back inside, helping to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature.
  • Central air conditioning can also be provided through a package unit or a heat pump.

Benefits:
  • Indoor comfort during warm weather - Central air conditioning helps keep your home cool and reduces humidity levels.
  • Cleaner air - As your central air conditioning system draws air out of various rooms in the house through return air ducts, the air is pulled through an air filter, which removes airborne particles such as dust and lint. Sophisticated filters may remove microscopic pollutants, as well. The filtered air is then routed to air supply ductwork that carries it back to rooms.
  • Quieter operation - Because the compressor bearing unit is located outside the home, the indoor noise level from its operation is much lower than that of a free-standing air conditioning unit.





















ed.

Sep 10, 2008 | Amana Air Conditioners

Tip

Lower the cost of your Central Air Conditioning Bill


Dirt is the enemy and your defense is simple and inexpensive.

Central air conditioning units are simple machines which take the warm air from inside your home and put it outside. There are two parts that do the bulk of this 'Heat Transfer", they are the inside coil and the outside coil. A coil that is covered with dirt does not transfer heat very well.

The outside coil is the outer layer of the unit located outdoors. First, shut off the power to the unit. Clear any weeds or decorative plants away from the machine. The machine should have a good 18 to 24" of clear space around it. More is better. If possible, nothing but blue sky should be above the unit. Although there are special detergents used by commercial contractors, I have found that in most residential locations, using a simple garden hose to wash the spaces between the aluminum fins is adequit. If you find that the fins are blocked, you should have a professional coil cleaning. While you are at the unit, take the time to straighten any fins that are bent over. Again, if a large area is bent and you find that you are damaging the fins, call a professional as they have special tools.

The inside coil is not so easy to access. For this reason, a high quality indoor air filter is recommended. Many people use carboard encased fiberglass filters, which cost about $1.00 each. Much better to go with a pleated media filter, even better, one maked high efficiency. Change it whe the surface is covered with a fine, even layer of dirt. Some homes will require monthly changing, most will need it every 3 months and a few will only need it once every 6 months. The Glass Fiber filters only catch the very big pieces, allowing the small particles of dust to flow into you indoor coil. WHile operating in the air conditioning mode, the inside coil is wet. This is because part of the process of removing heat involves removing humidity. WHen the fine dirt mixes with the moisture, a fine mud starts to build. If allowed to continue, the deminished air flow will result in poor performance and will require a professional cleaning that can take as much as 12 to 16 hours and involve extra charges for equipment involved in protecting the environment. In a worst case senerio, low air flow can cause the compressor to fail. Those 'Expensive" filters really are a bargain.

on Jul 19, 2010 | Air Conditioners

2 Answers

PTAC PDE12K3SB - No Heat


i think so may be the heating coils are not getting heat without power supply check out the plug in wire and whole supply.

Dec 18, 2007 | Friedrich Digital PTAC PDH12K35B Central...

3 Answers

My A/C blowing air, but it is not cool. It has started freezing up. We just replaced the air filters and since then it is freezing up. We even gently cleaned the a/c coils before replacing the filters. ...


Hello, sounds like it is either a low charge or lack of airflow, what type of filter are you using? sometimes those filters that claim to be super effecient will actually cut down on your airflow and cause the ac to freeze up.

Jul 15, 2011 | Intertherm Air Conditioners

2 Answers

York central unit condenser does not run. Red Led light on circuit board keeps blinking.


Hello,

There seem to be a problem with the unit that is why it is acting that way. If the air conditioner is not working but has the power light blinking. Yet the fan is not running, then you need to troubleshoot the unit. There are some tips for troubleshooting the air conditioner to be able to detect the problem and know the best appropriate procedure to solving the problem.

A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.

There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs.

Good luck.

Jul 14, 2011 | Air Conditioners

2 Answers

Is it ok to replace outside unit of central air and heat and not the inside air handler ? The upstairs A/C( over 10 yrs old) is not keeping up with South Texas heat. The temp upstairs climbs to 84-86...


I'm assuming you have had a competent Air Conditioning contractor look your unit over.if you trust your A/C contractor, why don't you work with them towards an answer? I would get an air flow and sizing analysis, a full equipment service/performance check, and see if there is something simple causing this dilemma. Possibly low refrigerant charge,or you have a filter or coil restriction on the indoor unit. I've seen mold plug a coil solidly before. And due to new federal regulations on air conditioning efficiency and the phase-out of R-22, I would recommend that any replacement equipment be done in full, not part and parcel. The newer two stage energy star rated cooling and/or heat pump offerings are a fantastic solution for premium indoor comfort, and the government is offering powerful incentives right now if you're in the market.

Aug 18, 2009 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Central air conditoner unit doesnt blow cool air into home has some ice on the inlet heat and cooling lines going into the central air unit


Change the furnace filter. Make sure you use a cheap one when air conditioning, as the better ones restrict airflow when they filter out so much stuff and then plug up, not allowing enough air to pass over the cooling coil in the furnace's air plenum. Turn the A/C off for a few hours (with only the furnace fan on if possible) to melt the ice off the cooling unit inside the furnace.

Sep 01, 2008 | Carrier Air Conditioners

2 Answers

Air Conditioner malfunction


Hi, Sounds like you have a short in the control circuit to me. Turn off all power going to the unit. Write down or otherwise mark the wires leaving the control board going to the thermostat. Remove them from the control board. Replace the fuse. Turn power back on and see if the fan still runs. If it does, check and or replace the heat limit switch that brings the fan on during the heat cycle. It may just need adjusted. If the fuse blows, I would think that the control board is probably bad. If it doesn't blow, Remove the thermostat. Leaving all thermostat wires open check them with an Ohm meter. There should be no continuity between them. Twist all the wires together at one end and ohm them again at the other end. You should have complete continuity on all wires. If the wiring checks out, down power the unit. Double check your wire colors and rewire the control board. With all wires open at the thermostat, turn the power back on. Touch the RED wire to the YELLOW wire. The Condensing unit should come on. Touch the RED wire to the GREEN wire. The fan should come on. Touch the RED wire to the WHITE wire. The heat should come on. Down power the unit. Replace the thermostat. Test unit. If the fuse has lasted ok but blows now it is either wired wrong at the Thermostat or the thermostat is bad. I hope I have helped. NOTE: If you can not understand these instructions. Call a licensed Heating / Air conditioning company. kstfas

Sep 23, 2007 | Air Conditioners

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