Question about ASUS T3-M2NC51PV Barebone

13 Answers

Powers down 3 secs after switching on - pre POST (no beep)

Built PC - switched on and entered CMOS - set boot priority to DVD then hard drive - booted from Windows XP CD - startup files successfully loaded - created HD partition - selected it and commenced formatting - got to 7% then PC hung - so forced a power down.

All subsequent attempts to boot PC fail after 3 secs without POST test and no beeps

Using AMD 5000 dual core Athlon 64 processor

Posted by on

  • 7 more comments 
  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Built PC - switched on and entered CMOS - set boot priority to DVD then hard drive - booted from Windows XP CD - startup files successfully loaded - created HD partition - selected it and commenced formatting - got to 7% then PC hung - so forced a power down.

    All subsequent attempts to boot PC fail after 3 secs without POST test and no beeps

    Thank you for the suggestion Witchunter - have already removed graphics card (relying on on-board graphics) and have in turn disconnected hard drive and DVD also removed all but one memory chip - still powers down after 3 secs.

    ny help will be most welcome

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Thanks rockfixya - the processor fan works immediately on switch on

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Thanks gdmisp (Go to CMOS and go to auto configuration with fail safe settings. save settings and exit. or F10 and restart cd set up) - my problem is that I cannot enter CMOS - screen remains blank (no invitation to enter setup)

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Thanks Witchunter - I was confident about the processor installation - however i did not use additional thermal paste just relied on that supplied on the cooler. Would 3 secs be enough to cause shutdown for this reason do you think?

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Thank you blueetc3221 - I used the long format (partition size 120 gb) however this problem is occuring prior to POST and without being able to enter CMOS

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    thank you askme - the hard drive is a new Western Digital 300 GB Caviar SATA II - however this problem is occuring pre POST test

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    thank you askme - the hard drive is a new Western Digital 300 GB Caviar SATA II - however this problem is occuring pre POST test

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    thanks ciraldo52 - I have virtually rebuilt the machine to no avail.

    Is it possible that this is a swith problem?

  • glenlee_john Jan 16, 2009

    Thank you Ronnieh49 - but I would have thought that a faulty hard drive would not prevent entry to CMOS?

×

13 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Brigadier General:

    An expert that has over 10,000 points.

  • Master
  • 5,158 Answers

Lets start with the obvious first... have you examined the power button to make sure it is not sticking. second... unplug everything including the hard drive... will it boot to the cmos ?
Third sometimes just unplugging it resetting the cmos (jumper or removing the cmos battery) will fix the issue

Robert

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 535 Answers

U have to chak your hdd its has been bed sector on it so u have to do this u need to plug your hard disk in to

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • sandip panchal
    sandip panchal Jan 16, 2009

    another computer the disk go in start>run>type cmd

    press enter



    then type this command chakdsk /r



    its will fix all the bed sector from your hard disk & then try to install

×

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

  • Expert
  • 367 Answers

Silly question but are you installing a 64 bit version of windows?

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • Rob Houg
    Rob Houg Jan 16, 2009

    You are correct faulty hd will not prevent access to cmos.

  • Rob Houg
    Rob Houg Jan 16, 2009

    Try removing the battery from the motherboard for a few minutes with pc unplugged. Put the battery back in try booting the computer

    You can also try reseating the memory sticks.

    Or removing them completely to see where you get in the boot proccess.

    If none of these work I would start looking at proccessor fan and power supply. Faulty fan or fan not plugged in will cause restart because of over heat. (although usually it takes longer than a couple seconds)

    Check proccessor fan also check to see processor is seated correctly.


  • Rob Houg
    Rob Houg Jan 16, 2009

    Sorry I skimmed through some of the responses and noticed you did see fan working for proccesor. I would check the fan in power supply as well as what the output is on the powr supply.

×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 500 times.

  • ASUS Master
  • 1,314 Answers

Hard drive? Unlikely, because it happens before post. CPU? Possibly, but very rare.

Have you tried power supply? New ones (especially those included with cases) are known for failing rather quickly. Test it with another power supply just to see if it boots up or not :c)

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Kevin Shafer
    Kevin Shafer Jan 16, 2009

    Could it be a the switch sticking? Again, possibly....to test that, short the switch jumpers on the motherboard to turn it on and see if it does it.

×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Brigadier General:

    An expert that has over 10,000 points.

  • Master
  • 6,966 Answers

Hi and welcome to FixYa,

May I suggest removing the processor and memory but leave the heatsink fan electrically connected. Power it up. If it does not shutdown within 3 seconds, most likely a defective processor. It it still shuts down, motherboard issue. Of course there is always the possibility that the motherboards will auto shutdown if it detects no processor.

Pls post back result(s). Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that has over 500 points.

    Champion:

    An expert who has answered 200 questions.

  • Expert
  • 435 Answers

Hi, from the description, these are the possibilities.
- Any newly installed hardware. Please disconnect and try. - Bad installation DVD/ CD. Try with another installation Disk. - Hard drive spoilt. In this case, try installating in a different partition and see.

I will update if I can think of any other possibility ... Also, set BIOS to default settings and see.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Master
  • 2,920 Answers

It usually suggests theres an issue with the hard drive..you might try installing a diffent win version and see if you cant upgrade from there sometimes that will work sometimes it wont. but itsounds like a hard drive issue

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 124 Answers

Try to remove everything and reinstal the os and boot sycence and try again try to unhook the main power block from everything and reconnect it hope this helps

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 416 Answers

It sounds like harddrive is bad
Is it new harddrive or used one
let me know
Good Luck

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 15,935 Answers

Use the manufacturer's software to scan hard drive for physical platter errors. Maxtor, Seagate and Westrn Digital have software to check, and repair sectors - and is available on their respective websites for download.
Are you using the quick format, or standard format?
Sometimes drives with large partitions have problems with the long format.
Try the quick format.
If it still doesnt work, check the drive for physical errors with the software I mentioned above.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • 3 more comments 
  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 16, 2009

    If you cannot enter CMOS, there may be a memory module problem, or video card problem. Remove all installed memory and video card, and re-seat firmly.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 16, 2009

    Reset the CMOS (either remove the battery for 5 min, or your M/B may have a jumper to use)

    Incompatible memory often causes voltage problems.

    Your model #s of installed components (M/B & memory module) would be helpful. otherwise we are grasping at straws.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 16, 2009

    you can also remove the battery and re-try. If the system works, your battery needs replacing.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 16, 2009

    Have you disconnected the drive to try and enter BIOS?

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 16, 2009

    The POST process checks the basic system functions before attempting to load an o/s. It checks RAM, Processor, drives, system interface, etc. If POST fails, the system will normally halt and may produce a series of beeps from the internal speaker which can help indicate the cause of the problem. Is your internal speaker hooked up?

×

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

  • Expert
  • 66 Answers

Go to CMOS and go to auto configuration with fail safe settings. save settings and exit. or F10 and restart cd set up .

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • David McCreery
    David McCreery Jan 16, 2009

    Ok uplug all stuff on pc . If you cannot enter CMOS, there memory module problem, or video card problem. Remove all installed memory and , and re-seat firmly.Then try to boot with system cd an a reconfigure.Then go back to in stall os.

  • David McCreery
    David McCreery Jan 16, 2009

    The only hardware that can be faulty at this point are motherboard or onboard drivers power supply jumpers on motherboard or processor.

×

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 679 Answers

Check out the processor fan.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • rockfixya
    rockfixya Jan 16, 2009

    Ok.. do some steps1. First of all reset BIOS to default setting and then try to boot. (if you cant able to go in BIOS setting that means there is some BIOS virus in BIOS)
    2. Try to boot your system from another bootable CD/DVD.
    If the solution not works for the problem that means there is some problem in hard drive (HDD) of your system.


  • rockfixya
    rockfixya Jan 16, 2009

    scan your BIOS with any new updated antivirus.


  • rockfixya
    rockfixya Jan 20, 2009

    please let me know if problem solved.
    Thanks for using FixYa.



×

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 98 Answers

What you can try is removing all of your add-on cards, leaving only main components in the system. This way, if the computer boots, you will rule out all the main components as faulty.
Next, try adding add-on components one by one and see which one hangs the system.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • 2 more comments 
  • Nikola Malesevic
    Nikola Malesevic Jan 16, 2009

    You could try putting the other memory module instead of the current one, maybe the problem is there.

    This behavior might occur if processor temperature is too high, so motherboard shuts down the system. Are you sure processor is well mounted with thermal paste and has working cooler on it?

  • Nikola Malesevic
    Nikola Malesevic Jan 16, 2009

    Try removing memory modules as well. If it doesn't beep, memory is just fine. Then the only things that are left are procesorr and motherboard.

    One more thing: You can remove your CMOS battery for 30 seconds - this way, BIOS will reset. Put it back and try to boot. There is a way to clear CMOS settings via jumper, but that depends on the motherboard.


  • Nikola Malesevic
    Nikola Malesevic Jan 16, 2009

    First try the methods of clearing CMOS.

    If it doesn't help, then it might just be that processor is too hot.

    Leave it be for an hour or two in some chilly place, then try to boot it. If it shows you boot screen, or at least lives for 15 seconds - cooling is the problem.

    Of course, you will have to solve this as soon as possible to avoid burning the processor.


  • Nikola Malesevic
    Nikola Malesevic Jan 16, 2009

    Please disregard all of the comments stating the faulty drive or entering BIOS.

    Also pay attention to Benimur's post.

    The only hardware that can be faulty at this point are motherboard or processor.


×

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Boot failed


Is the optical drive a DVD drive?

Have you set the machine to boot from the optical drive?

Frequently the HP boot sequence is accessed by touching the Escape key on boot.

Dec 12, 2013 | HP ProLiant DL120 G6 Rack Server System...

1 Answer

Fans running but wont boot


Test all leads that attach to your hard drive power and data cables IDE SATA

the leads from your MOTHERBOARD TO YOUR HARD DRIVE make sure they have a secure dust free connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty


make sure all leads that are attached to your dvd\cd floppy drives have secure connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty


computers need power and data to travel through every working device to continue its cycle and have an end so any faulty leads will end up with a computer error


even something as small as a faulty electrical or fan lead can cause you problems



motherboard and a hard drive any leads between them will fail before your motherboard or your hard drive if its a flat ribbon 40 pin type IDE replace it this will be the first to fail



check all electrical power input and extensions make sure they are securely seated even the cd/dvd floppy drives need to have current go through make sure these drives are working



also check the Cmos battery and computer RAM modules make sure they are securely seated with no dust built up or in the sockets on some motherboards cmos batteries are soldered in


check you CPU central processing unit make sure its securely seated and has thermal paste it might be getting to hot the thermal paste will help disperse the heat

Thermal compound is a sticky paste that is placed directly onto the CPU.


Allowing for a more direct heat transfer between the CPU and HEAT SINK and preventing air gaps from forming between the CPU and heat sink.

hope this helps

Jul 25, 2012 | ASUS S-presso Standard S1-P112...

1 Answer

My m2n32 sli delux fails to restart when exited from the cmos setup,also when i power it off by the power buttum it still fails to beep.onless i switch the power suply off for a while before it beeps.i ve...


Test your PSU power supply unit or replace it if your power supply units fan is not working your PSU is faulty



One bad lead can cause a computer to continue on a cycle of restarting or to shutdown or fail to detect/ boot up a computer hard drive



Test all leads that attach to your hard drive power and data cables IDE SATA

the leads from your MOTHERBOARD TO YOUR HARD DRIVE make sure they have a secure dust free connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty


make sure all leads that are attached to your dvd\cd floppy drives have secure connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty


computers need power and data to travel through every working device to continue its cycle and have an end so any faulty leads will end up with a computer error


even something as small as a faulty electrical or fan lead can cause you problems



motherboard and a hard drive any leads between them will fail before your motherboard or your hard drive if its a flat ribbon 40 pin type IDE replace it this will be the first to fail



check all electrical power input and extensions make sure they are securely seated even the cd/dvd floppy drives need to have current go through make sure these drives are working



also check the Cmos battery and computer RAM modules make sure they are securely seated with no dust built up or in the sockets on some motherboards cmos batteries are soldered in


check you CPU central processing unit make sure its securely seated and has thermal paste it might be getting to hot the thermal paste will help disperse the heat

Thermal compound is a sticky paste that is placed directly onto the CPU.


Allowing for a more direct heat transfer between the CPU and HEAT SINK and preventing air gaps from forming between the CPU and heat sink.

hope this helps

May 30, 2012 | ASUS Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Windowsxp boot disc WinXp Setup Process


Restart you computer during the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key to enter setup usually the F2 or the Delete key
Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS the navigate to advanced bios features using the arrows keys press enter change your first boot device to cd press escape then press f10 to save to cmos to restart
note this will erase you operating system you will have to have an operating system disk to load it onto you hard drive or create a partition to load another operating system
note after you have loaded the operating system you should go back and change the first boot device to your failsafe or optimized defaults otherwise it might keep booting from the cd
after windows has loaded
your computer will automatically restart it might restart 2 times one to finish the installation
the next will be because the operating system is loaded and will boot from your cd
during the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key to enter setup
Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS using the arrow keys load failsafe defaults or load optimized defaults press escape then press f10 to save to cmos to restart
hope it helps

May 20, 2012 | Iwill XP4 Barebone

1 Answer

I want to fomat omatek computer


you have to format your hard drive using a third party disc to erase everything on your hard drive
During the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key to enter setup usually the F2 or the Delete key
Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS the navigate to advanced bios features using the arrows keys press enter change your first boot device to cd press escape then press f10 to save to cmos to restart
note this will erase you operating system you will have to have an operating system disk to load it onto you hard drive or create a partition to load another operating system
note after you have loaded the operating system you should go back and change the first boot device to your failsafe or optimized defaults otherwise it might keep booting from the cd
after windows has loaded
your computer will automatically restart it might restart 2 times one to finish the installation
the next will be because the operating system is loaded and will boot from your cd
during the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key to enter setup
Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS using the arrow keys load failsafe defaults or load optimized defaults press escape then press f10 to save to cmos to restart
hope it helps

May 12, 2012 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

When I switch on the hard drive it sometimes takes several attemps switching on before it will boot up


If its making a clicking noise normally Means some thing is wrong with the hardware and would need to be sent back to the manufacture.

May 12, 2012 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

How do I boot up an operating system after my hard drive has been wiped


If your hard drive has been wiped then it means you will need to re-install your operating system onto it. To do so follow these simple instructions:

Step 1) Press the Delete key as your PC boots up. This will take you to the BIOS.
Step 2) In the BIOS find the boot disk priority. Set priority 1 to your CD/DVD drive and set priority 2 to your hard drive.
Step 3) Save and exit the BIOS.
Step 4) Insert your operating system install disk into your CD/DVD drive.
Step 5) The installation should now start.

Mar 05, 2011 | HP Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Tell me aboout boot sequence in bios setup


The system BIOS is what starts the computer running when you turn it on. The following are the steps that a typical boot sequence involves. Of course this will vary by the manufacturer of your hardware, BIOS, etc., and especially by what peripherals you have in the PC. Here is what generally happens when you turn on your system power:
The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.

When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
The BIOS displays its startup screen.
The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Dec 15, 2010 | HP Barebone Systems

1 Answer

ASUS M2N68-AM SE2 GeForce 7025 Socket AM2+ MB built system. Works great with Sata hard drive. Removed my older 500GB IDE hard drive and CDROM from old PC. When i try to put both, or either 1 into to IDE...


Try to go into the bios and set the first boot device as your sata hdd. There will be a option in boot section of the cmos setup where the hdd drive order will be mentioned. If PATA is shown first press enter in the option select SATA and press enter save and exit changes things should go on fine.


Also check your pata hdd and cdrom specific jumper setting. For more help post your HDD model and make and cdrom model and the bios type

Dec 01, 2009 | Barebone Systems

Not finding what you are looking for?
ASUS T3-M2NC51PV Barebone Logo

Related Topics:

58 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top ASUS Barebone Systems Experts

Florin

Level 3 Expert

733 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

60960 Answers

Michael Thomas
Michael Thomas

Level 3 Expert

3051 Answers

Are you an ASUS Barebone System Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...