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Friends, I need to figure out the following: I have a furnace that will heat from an electrical or solar ( hot water ) source. the solar source pump runs on 120vac and the electric runs on 240vac. I need a way to have the system switched between the electic and solar sources determined by the temperature of the water in the storage tanks. I would use a 10K sensor in the storage tank. And the system has to be controlled by the 24vac thermostat. I am confused. any help would be greatly appreciated. Reed B. Turney

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What you need is called an aquastat. good luck

Posted on Jan 19, 2009

  • Reed Turney Jan 03, 2014

    joe, boy that was a while back!! i did end up using two aquastats, one making on temp rise, one on temp drop..worked well except that each aquastat had a 5% differential, so there was a 'gap' between them when neither would function...changed over to an electric tankless water heater in the furnace circulation loop that turns on via one aquastat feeding two valves that will isolate the heater when temps are high and when they are low, it closes the bypass and opens the heater loop....so thanks for the help...apprediated..

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Solar hot water not hot


Solar hot water giving you cold showers? Eight tips to warm you up.
Eight tips to get the most from solar hot water
We argue that policy needs to look beyond installation and that installation practices need improving, but what can you do to get an effective installation?
First, seek out independent advice from sources such as local sustainability events and organisations. They can help you understand what suits your circumstances and what characterises an effective installation.
A good organisation is theAlternative Technology Association. They provide free advice to members, sell a solar hot water guide, and organise open house events where you can see and discuss domestic sustainability technologies.
Second, consider whether solar hot water is the best option. It may be that a hot water heat pump or an instant gas system is a suitable choice, depending on where you live, how much cloud cover you have, or what sort of building you are in.
Third, make sure all your hot water pipes are insulated, especially the pipes that go to and from the tank and solar panels. You typically need insulation to be 15 mm thick. Without proper insulation you could lose half the energy you are trying to collect.
Fourth, get a booster switch installed in a convenient place inside, so you can easily turn the booster off if there is plenty of sun, or on if it's cloudy or you need more hot water.
Fifth, if you go solar, install a system that has a sufficiently large tank matched with a sufficiently large solar array for your needs. Water is very good at storing heat. A large tank could help you store solar energy for those rainy days.
Sixth, you may need to change electricity tariffs if your booster is electric, to ensure the sun gets a chance to heat the water before the electricity does.
Seventh, you may need to change your peak hot water use habits so that the tank water is at its coldest after morning use, after which the sun can then heat it during the day. The booster can "top up" overnight, ready for morning showers.
Eighth, before you install solar hot water, examine and discuss household expectations around hot water use. Will they need to change? Are members of your household prepared to make that change?
This may be the most profound change you can make, but also perhaps the most challenging.

Oct 30, 2016 | Water Water Heaters

Tip

Solar Air Heating - You Can Cut Utility Costs and Save Money


Solar energy is becoming very quickly recognized as one of the best alternatives to fossil fuels It is an abundant and renewable natural resource. It can be used to save energy in residential, commercial, and industrial settings. Solar technologies will use the sun's energy to provide heat, hot water, light, electricity, and cooling, for homes, businesses, and industry.

Many major advancements have been made in the solar technology fields over the recent years. Solar air heating is becoming more attractive than ever before now that it is becoming lower in cost and more efficient. Solar energy is easily the cleanest and most inexhaustible of any of the known energy sources. The many variations in energy prices have fueled interest in alternative fuels such as solar energy. Demand for solar energy has been increasing exponentially as heating, cooling and many other energy costs continue to skyrocket.

Solar air heating and solar water heating are two examples of solar thermal technologies which produce heat, but not electricity. Solar air heat is best suited for installation in new construction and existing houses. Solar panels for any type of heating should be placed on a south-facing pitched roof, free of shade. The angle should be between 20 and 50 degrees. They may also be mounted on an angled frame on the ground or on a flat roof. Solar air collectors (the devices that heat up the air using solar energy) can directly heat individual rooms. They also can potentially pre-heat the air passing into a heat recovery ventilator or the air of an air-source heat pump. Solar heating panels can be one of the most cost effective ways to reduce your utility bills. This will make a positive contribution towards a better environment. Solar air heating systems often use large bins filled with rocks that store heat (although this method is becoming rare due to problems associated with controlling moisture and mold growth in the rock).

Energy Policy Act has implemented a 30% tax credit for consumers who chose to install solar water heating systems. State and local government programs are now being put in place to encourage the use of solar energy. Cash incentives are available for those that integrate solar energy technology as an alternative energy source. The Department of Energy (DOE) is working to design even more cost-effective solar heating systems and to improve the longevity of the materials used in those systems. Other incentive programs now include offering homeowners tax credits for solar panel installations and for solar heating systems. With solar power you will save money, increase your property value, help protect the environment and help to create a more secure America by reducing our dependence on foreign energy fuel sources.

A great solar heating system will save energy, reduce utility costs, and produce clean energy.

on Dec 12, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Oil furnace only produces cool water intermittedly and only when heat is actively on


For clarity, a Furnace produces HOT AIR for heat while a boiler produces HOT WATER for heat. Just remember...boil = water. You said your "furnace" does not produce hot water for a shower and because furnaces do not product hot water unless they have some model that do???? Usually people with a furnace have a seperate hot water heater. People with boilers though can produce hot water for use as both their sinks/showers hot water and their heat (by heating water that goes through baseboards) in their house. I don't believe any furnaces produce hot water most of the time a furnace just produces hot air for heating. So figure out what you first have.
Having said that, I'll assume you have a boiler like I do and my Weil McClean(sp?) stopped working a while back and wasn't turning on to "boil" any water. I took apart the burner and there is a light sensing photo resistor as part of the controls. If this phto resistor goes bad, the boiler will not start. The resister is cheap, I think it was $8 but you have to know what you're doing to change it. So you may be better to call someone who can work on such equipment.
Boiler's themselves are not overly complex. Home heating oil is the same diesel fuel that you can buy in a gas station only the government has "oil" companies put a RED die in home heating fuel which is usually cheaper then Diesel fuel because diesel fuel is taxed to death. The reason they do that is so that if you try putting RED tinted home heating fuel in your truck and you get pulled over (because you're a trucker with and 18 wheeler and they typically do inspections of these trucks) you will be a huge fine if they see you're running home heating fuel and NOT paying your taxed by purchasing Diesel fuel. A little bit of background so you know the fuel you are dealing with here. So it's dieslel fuel without the tax you run in your boiler. Gasoline on the other hand is VERY explosive as you know, but diesel fuel (if you're ever tried to light it) takes some coaxing to get lit. When it's cold out, diesel fuel is very hard to light and that's why trucks use glow plugs. You don't need those in your home though.
But because diesel fuel/home heating oil is hard to light, it's sprayed as a msit into your boiler, so that it can light more easily.
But because it is a fuel, you should know what you're doing when messing with it. FInd out what you have, and then have someone work on the issue if you haven't already. I'm guessing you have had it fixed by now?

Mar 21, 2014 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

I presently have a heat pump fitted to my hot water geyser. I want to add a solar panel to the preasent system. How do I best connect the solar panel into the water lines.


Hi
You can't directly connect a thermal panel to your hot water pipes.
Normally the thermal panel would heat an accumilator (hot water tank) with enough capacity to absorb the daily output of the thermal panel or panels.
But If you were able to get your hands on an old hot water tank (even a small one) with at least a single coil you could heat the tank with the thermal panel and utilise the coil to preheat (or heat depending on flow and tank temperature) your hot water line.
You would need to follow all manufacturers specs for installation of the thermal system as the temperatures and pressures can be very high.

Oct 28, 2013 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

1 Answer

How long will it take Rheem solar hot water to heat up


read manual:
http://www.rheem.com.au/Assets/1294/1/Rheemsolarlolineelectric511series.pdf
Usually electric element heats about 20 gallons per hour.
It appears the element is controlled by thermostat and automatically kicks ON when tank falls below thermostat set point..
This will be handy since element will continually heat the circulating water when outside temperatures turn cool... of course it will also be wasteful if thermostat is set high.

Jul 11, 2013 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

No hot water


10-22-12
Copy following links to help identify product and download possible troubleshoot resources:

Tank-type gas
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-troubleshoot-gas-water-heater.html

Tank-type electric:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-troubleshoot-electric-problems-with-water-heater.html

Rheem tankless:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Troubleshoot-Rheem-Tankless-water-heater.html

Other types of water heaters include boiler, tankless electric, indirect, solar-assisted, solar, hybrid electric, heat pump, wood-burning, gas hybrid, 3-phase commercial electric.

Oct 21, 2012 | Rheem Water Heaters

2 Answers

How to design and calculate the solar heat panel for hot water system for the concentrated 100 nos. staff toilets and changing rooms of commercial building in Beijing. What is the basic and ancillary...


Usually toilets do not require hot water.
Is the plumbing divided into hot and cold water pipes?
If toilets are hooked to hot water, how many flushes and how many gallons per flush per day.
What is the expected consumption per each worker?
What is the latitude from equator, and expected solar input. Further north, and hazy atmosphere reduce input. Beijing has smog I believe.
How often is the solar panel going to cleaned of smog and dirt for maximum collection?
If the area has hard water, then the entire system is prone to sediment build-up and failure unless water is artificially softened.
Solar water heater temperatures can exceed 180 degrees at times. This temperature will damage storage tank that is not made for that temperature.
Most solar water heater systems have pressure regulating valve and expansion tank to accommodate occasional high temperature and pressure.

A good fellow to contact might be at following website:
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/WaterHeating/water_heating.htm

Solar collectors are usually connected to a circulating pump, and then the heated water is stored in a tank.
The pump circulates water continually from solar collectors through a storage tank.
This type of system would use ordinary tank-type water heater for storage.
Most of these systems also utilize a back-up heating element inside the tank.

More complicated systems circulate special liquid through spiral tubes inside the water heater.
This type of heater would be an indirect water heater.
Indirect heaters are used for solar collectors, and used with boilers, or any outside heat source.
http://www.bockwaterheaters.com/Products/products_coil_tank_water_heaters.html
http://www.hotwater.com/products/residential/cirrex_solar.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/solar-water-heaters-on-roof_lbiRv_5784111-500x282.jpg

Oct 05, 2011 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Why heater coils glow?


It sounds like you're describing one of two things. The hot surface ignitor in a gas-fired furnace, or the resistive heat strips in an electric furnace.

The hot surface ignitor in a gas-fired furnace lights the burners. This ignitor in modern furnaces serves the same purpose as the standing pilot flame did in older furnaces. It provides the required heat to ignite the gas at the burners. Without an ignition source, a gas-fired furnace cannot provide heat. When the ignitor is activated it will glow bright orange or yellow.

The resistive heat strips in an electric furnace actually provide the heat to a home or building. When the furnace turns on, the heat strips are activated and usually glow orange when they reach peak temperature. In almost all cases, the heat strips are not easily seen or accessed without removing covers or panels inside the furnace.

Feb 28, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have hot water but the central heating has stopped working


Your heating system is separate from your domestic hot water. This means that you probably have an electric or gas appliance dedicated to heat water for your home.

Your problem will be found with your furnace or fuel supply. Since it is not unusual to heat water with a different fuel (electric, gas, etc.) than you do to heat your home, one can work while the other does not. Your first check should be to determine which energy source is required for your home to be heated. Home Heating Oil, Natural Gas and Propane are very common fuels. Additionally, many of these systems require some sort of electric supply to provide power for controls, pumps, sensors, etc.

Check for blown fuses and tripped circuit breakers in the electrical panel. Restore any failed circuit found. Check fuel level gauges. Arrange for refueling if you are out of fuel. If heating with Home Heating Oil, the delivery driver will probably need to manually prime and start your furnace before it will work automatically again.

You may also have a defective thermostat, control or sensor. Additionally, the furnace may have detected an unsafe condition when last run, and shut down as a safety precaution. If any of these things have happened, you'll probably need to have a pro check it out and make the required repairs for you. You could start by contacting your fuel company to see if they offer service. Otherwise, check telephone listings for someone that does.

Hopefully, this helps you atleast find someone who can get the heat back on for you - good luck!

Nov 10, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

On-Demand Water Heater


An on-demand, or tankless, water heater is a system for heating water as it passes through the pipes, usually very near the point of use. Traditional tank water heaters bring the water to approximately 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 C), in order to ensure the water supply lasts long after the heater turns off. Since this is obviously far too hot to be pumped out of a shower of faucet, cold water is added to the mix in the pipes. Coupled with the loss of thermal energy over time, the average tank heater has an efficiency of approximately 80%. On-demand water heaters have a number of advantages over their tank-using counterparts. While tanks often degrade over time and begin leaking, the apparatus used in an on-demand water heater is much less susceptible to the burdens of age, and will often outlive the house they're installed in. The amount of energy used is a fraction of that used in a tank water heater, due to increased efficiency and a much smaller window during which a heating source is in use. While tank hot water heaters can, and often do, run out of hot water after a number of showers, on-demand heaters provide a never-ending supply of hot water, ensuring that warm water is always available when needed. A tankless water heater can cost between $500 and $1500, and they most commonly use either electric or natural gas energy to heat the water. Most mid-sized households report an energy savings of approximately 25-45% for a gas or propane heater, and up to 50% with an electric heater, over using traditional tank heaters. Water is usually set to a maximum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 C), though many heaters allow for custom setting of the maximum temperature via remote control. Outflow rates range from 8-14 gallons (30-53 litres) per minute. Installation for most tankless water heaters is incredibly easy, involving simple plumbing. In the case of electric heaters, all that is required for a fuel source is to plug the heater into an outlet and begin heating your water. Some modern on-demand water heaters can incorporate a solar preheating system. This system uses a traditional solar heating system and tank to bring the water nearer to the desired temperature, saving substantial energy use in the final on-demand heating. A solar preheating system costs between $500 and $800.

Aug 27, 2008 | Stiebel Eltron CK20E Electric Tankless...

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