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My phonograph is humming

Hi I just bought a second hand phonograph. the guy I bought it from let me listen to a few records and they all sounded great (so I know the phonograph works fine).
My amp does not have a PHONO in, so I bought a simple pre-amp. The problem is that my amp also doesn't have an EARTH or GROUND connection, and I don't know what I can connect the phonograph's earth wire to. Folllowing an advice from another technical support website, I tried to connect it to the amp's body - it did reduce the humming but not enough - it sounds much worse than when I bought it.
Help! :)

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  • galzohar5 Jan 16, 2009

    Connecting the chassis of the player to the chassis of the amp reduces the humming significantly but it is still there and very noticeable. The record player is CEC BD-3200.

  • galzohar5 Jan 16, 2009

    thanks :(

  • fluffhead76
    fluffhead76 Feb 18, 2012

    I have the same exact problem!!!!

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More flexibility wanted in home theatre.
I have installed a new Denon AVR689 receiver in my home media center. I have more old analog components than can be easily connected, 2 tape decks, Dolby NR, DBX NR, turntable, etc. There is actually no "phono" connection on the Denon. Looks like a preamp is in order for the turntable.
If I am going to add a preamp for the turntable anyway, would it work to add a regular component preamp to the system that would would handle several more analog componets at the same tiem? Can I run rca connectors from the external preamp to a line input on the receiver, then select that input as the path to additional components connected to the separate preamp?
If this will not work, how can I add more components to my system?
Thanks,
Vann

Posted on Apr 19, 2009

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There is no need of earth wire between units if audio connecting cables are OK. Any how, connect a wire between PreAmp and Amplifier as earth or ground. If you connect earth wire between amplifier and phono this will cause hummm noise.
Please aslo check and make sure that audio connecting cables are OK and plugged properly.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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Problem with the ic on the main board of the amplifier that needs to be replaced

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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  • Master
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Hi!
A ground loop typically adds a loud low-frequency hum or buzz as soon as you plug in any of various audio or video components, including subwoofers, cable-TV outboard boxes, satellite-TV feeds, TV displays, amplifiers, A/V receivers or turntables. The buzz/hum is a byproduct of the multiple power supply cables and a ground voltage differential within your system and its network of interconnecting cables.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

  • Rylee Smith
    Rylee Smith Jan 16, 2009

    You get your system up and running and hear an audible buzz or hum, the first culprit to look at is either the powered subwoofer or your cable-TV or satellite-box feed at the entry point to your system.


  • First, the subwoofer: unplug the coaxial cable that connects to your powered subwoofer to see if the ground-loop hum disappears. If it does, it's likely coming in through your cable/satellite TV feed.


  • Reconnect your subwoofer's coaxial cable from the subwoofer input to your receiver's subwoofer output and disconnect the cable-TV feed (or satellite feed) from your outboard set-top cable box or satellite tuner. Be sure and disconnect the cable before any splitters. Now see if the hum/buzz from your subwoofer stops.



  • Rylee Smith
    Rylee Smith Jan 16, 2009

    And if that doesn't work then you need a phono preamp. You aren't hearing just 60 cycle hum, you're getting all the noise and junk from the low output of the table, plus there's a huge impedence mismatch.

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    All u need to do is run a wire from the record player chassis to the chassis of the amp, any screw will do as long as the 2 chassis are hooked togeather. The hum is AC current hum.

    Posted on Jan 16, 2009

    • yadayada
      yadayada Jan 16, 2009

      all record players have some hum (a common complaint in favor of CD players), the next thing to do is remove the cartridge and clean the contacts, this is another source of hum, u can also install a surge protector on the power supply ( just like the one on any PC), this cleans up and filters the power and will also reduce hum, I have had ever issue with hum that there is and one or more of these fixes will work.

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