Question about Tappan TGF320 Gas Kitchen Range

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The oven won't light.

I replaced the oven gas control valve. Still doesn't light. I am not sure but I think there is no power to the control valve. The tag on the valve says it is 3.3 vac. Not sure where to go from here?

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Jeff, i read your other ? here and i think you probably have a weak ignitor. does the ignitor glow orange?
if it does, or i should say when it does, just tap lightly on the gas valve and see if that causes the gas to flow into the burner and then light.
you can use the handle of a screwdriver to tap with and it wont need to much force.
if this does work, then just replace the ignitor. when they get weak they will glow, but wont draw enough current thru the gas valve to allow it to open. your valve does get voltage but it opens when enough current draw opens the bi-metal portion of the valve to allow gas to flow.
if you have no glow, then its a whole different problem. to be addressed in next comments.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

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Tip

Replacing an Oven Igniter on a Gas Range


This advice is for GAS ovens with glow bar type igniters. This is a fairly simple repair that MOST do-it-yourselfers can accomplish with just a little guidance. But, first, here’s a little gas oven theory to help you better understand how to determine if an igniter is bad:

The way the ignition system in most of today’s ovens work is like this:

  1. Set the oven or broiler temperature.
  2. The igniter begins to glow.
  3. Once the igniter reaches a certain current potential, the gas safety valve opens.
  4. Gas is introduced into the manifold and you have ignition.
  5. NOTE: It can take roughly 30 – 90 seconds from the time you set your oven temp to the time it takes for the gas to ignite.

NOTE: This is a designed safety feature of the oven to prevent free flowing gas from accumulating in your home without ignition. That’s why you typically don’t hear any gas flowing when you have an igniter problem. You might think you have a gas problem when actually you have an ignition problem.

TWO BASIC IGNITER TYPES:

Carborundum (Cylindrical in shape) – needs to produce 2.5 to 3.0 amps for the gas safety valve to work.
Norton (Rectangular in shape) – needs to produce 3.2 to 3.7 amps for the gas safety valve to work.

NOTE: There is a UNIVERSAL FLAT BAR igniter on the market as well, that can be used as a substitute if the igniter type that came with your range is not available.

An easy way to determine if you may have an igniter problem is to check BOTH your oven features. If the oven doesn’t light, check the broiler and vice versa. Since both the BROIL manifold and BAKE manifold are fed from the same gas source, but have separate igniters, it’s an easy assumption to make that the igniter may be bad, if one or the other doesn’t light.

The igniter typically goes bad in one of two ways, the igniter either stops glowing completely, or becomes weak over time and doesn’t produce enough current to open the gas safety valve (in this case the igniter will still glow but the oven still won’t light). Longer ignition times can be another symptom of an igniter possibly going bad.

For this solution, however, we’re going to assume you have a bad igniter and need to replace it. Follows these steps:

NOTE: The same method applies to both the broiler and bake manifold.

  1. UNPLUG the range and turn the gas off if you have a local gas cut-out valve (it is recommended that you do).
  2. Open oven door and remove (if possible). Refer to your owner’s manual to see if there are instructions on how to remove the oven door. Some have spring-loaded locking hinges, while others just lift out. If you cannot figure out how to remove the oven door, use care not to lean on the door or put too much weight on it. A common complaint following any kind of oven maintenance is that the oven door doesn’t shut correctly any longer. This is usually caused by bending the hinges or springs coming loose.
  3. Remove the oven racks, and remove the oven pan. (There are usually two screws either in the back or front of the oven holding the pan in place).
  4. Remove the Flame Spreader. This is a metal plate on top of the manifold.
  5. The igniter will be mounted directly to the gas manifold. Follow the wires that lead to igniter. It will either be plugged into a connector, or be connected together with ceramic wire lugs. Your replacement igniter should come with extra ceramic wire lugs. In the event the plug does not match the one on your range, cut the wires and connect using the ceramic wire lugs. DO NOT use standard wire lugs, they are not heat resistant and will melt.
  6. Unplug the old igniter and remove the mounting screw holding it to the gas manifold.
  7. Install new igniter on gas manifold using care not to handle the element on the igniter with your hands. The oil from your hands can cause damage and/or premature failure. The igniter is also considered FRAGILE.
  8. Reconnect the wires using the recommendations mentioned in Step 5.
  9. Plug in the range, turn the gas valve back on and do a visual test by setting the oven temperature to the desired range. Allow 30 – 90 seconds for the igniter to light the gas. Turn oven off and allow sufficient time to cool. If the oven has only been lit for a minute or so, the cool down period will be brief.
  10. Reinstall the flame spreader, oven pan, and racks. Reinstall door if necessary.

Most igniters cost around $50. Prices will vary with models. I hope this information is helpful.

on Dec 04, 2009 | Kitchen Ranges

Tip

Replacing an Oven Igniter on a Gas Range


This advice is for GAS ovens with glow bar type igniters. This is a fairly simple repair that MOST do-it-yourselfers can accomplish with just a little guidance. But, first, here’s a little gas oven theory to help you better understand how to determine if an igniter is bad:

The way the ignition system in most of today’s ovens work is like this:

  1. Set the oven or broiler temperature.
  2. The igniter begins to glow.
  3. Once the igniter reaches a certain current potential, the gas safety valve opens.
  4. Gas is introduced into the manifold and you have ignition.
  5. NOTE: It can take roughly 30 – 90 seconds from the time you set your oven temp to the time it takes for the gas to ignite.

NOTE: This is a designed safety feature of the oven to prevent free flowing gas from accumulating in your home without ignition. That’s why you typically don’t hear any gas flowing when you have an igniter problem. You might think you have a gas problem when actually you have an ignition problem.

TWO BASIC IGNITER TYPES:

Carborundum (Cylindrical in shape) – needs to produce 2.5 to 3.0 amps for the gas safety valve to work.
Norton (Rectangular in shape) – needs to produce 3.2 to 3.7 amps for the gas safety valve to work.

NOTE: There is a UNIVERSAL FLAT BAR igniter on the market as well, that can be used as a substitute if the igniter type that came with your range is not available.

An easy way to determine if you may have an igniter problem is to check BOTH your oven features. If the oven doesn’t light, check the broiler and vice versa. Since both the BROIL manifold and BAKE manifold are fed from the same gas source, but have separate igniters, it’s an easy assumption to make that the igniter may be bad, if one or the other doesn’t light.

The igniter typically goes bad in one of two ways, the igniter either stops glowing completely, or becomes weak over time and doesn’t produce enough current to open the gas safety valve (in this case the igniter will still glow but the oven still won’t light). Longer ignition times can be another symptom of an igniter possibly going bad.

For this solution, however, we’re going to assume you have a bad igniter and need to replace it. Follows these steps:

NOTE: The same method applies to both the broiler and bake manifold.

  1. UNPLUG the range and turn the gas off if you have a local gas cut-out valve (it is recommended that you do).
  2. Open oven door and remove (if possible). Refer to your owner’s manual to see if there are instructions on how to remove the oven door. Some have spring-loaded locking hinges, while others just lift out. If you cannot figure out how to remove the oven door, use care not to lean on the door or put too much weight on it. A common complaint following any kind of oven maintenance is that the oven door doesn’t shut correctly any longer. This is usually caused by bending the hinges or springs coming loose.
  3. Remove the oven racks, and remove the oven pan. (There are usually two screws either in the back or front of the oven holding the pan in place).
  4. Remove the Flame Spreader. This is a metal plate on top of the manifold.
  5. The igniter will be mounted directly to the gas manifold. Follow the wires that lead to igniter. It will either be plugged into a connector, or be connected together with ceramic wire lugs. Your replacement igniter should come with extra ceramic wire lugs. In the event the plug does not match the one on your range, cut the wires and connect using the ceramic wire lugs. DO NOT use standard wire lugs, they are not heat resistant and will melt.
  6. Unplug the old igniter and remove the mounting screw holding it to the gas manifold.
  7. Install new igniter on gas manifold using care not to handle the element on the igniter with your hands. The oil from your hands can cause damage and/or premature failure. The igniter is also considered FRAGILE.
  8. Reconnect the wires using the recommendations mentioned in Step 5.
  9. Plug in the range, turn the gas valve back on and do a visual test by setting the oven temperature to the desired range. Allow 30 – 90 seconds for the igniter to light the gas. Turn oven off and allow sufficient time to cool. If the oven has only been lit for a minute or so, the cool down period will be brief.
  10. Reinstall the flame spreader, oven pan, and racks. Reinstall door if necessary.

Most igniters cost around $50. Prices will vary with models. I hope this information is helpful.

on Feb 18, 2008 | GE Profile Spectra JGBP90 Gas Kitchen...

1 Answer

Tappan 32-1272-10/07056-8509-4080 gas range/oven pilot light works,main oven burner won't come on


You will need to look and see if the igniter is glowing a bright red. If it is weak, the oven will not light. Here is the igniter if you need to order it.

Also check and make sure your getting 3.2-3.6 volts AC to the valve.

Dec 01, 2012 | Tappan TGF320 Gas Kitchen Range

1 Answer

The oven doesn.t go on, I see the ignighter turn on but the gas won't light.


Hello Jim,
Believe it not the igniter is the problem,yes indeed it is coming on yet it is not getting hot enough to allow the gas valve to open. By replacing the igniter with a fresh strong one, the oven will work just fine.

GENE

Nov 14, 2011 | Kitchen Ranges

1 Answer

KESC308LLSO Both of the left -side cooktop eyes won't turn on (the right-side work fine), and the broiler element won't turn on. Our home electrical box was struck by lightening and has been...


Hi,If the model range you have this listed under is correct, the problem more than likely is a bad igniter on the Bake manifold. Each manifold has its own igniter. Since the bake feature gets used more often it tends to wear out faster. The following link explains oven igniters and how to replace one:

This advice is for GAS ovens with glow bar type igniters. This is a fairly simple repair that MOST do-it-yourselfers can accomplish with just a little guidance. But, first, here?s a little gas oven theory to help you better understand how to determine if an igniter is bad:

The way the ignition system in most of today?s ovens work is like this:

Set the oven or broiler temperature.
The igniter begins to glow.
Once the igniter reaches a certain current potential, the gas safety valve opens.
Gas is introduced into the manifold and you have ignition.
NOTE: It can take roughly 30 ? 90 seconds from the time you set your oven temp to the time it takes for the gas to ignite.


NOTE: This is a designed safety feature of the oven to prevent free flowing gas from accumulating in your home without ignition. That?s why you typically don?t hear any gas flowing when you have an igniter problem. You might think you have a gas problem when actually you have an ignition problem.

TWO BASIC IGNITER TYPES:

Carborundum (Cylindrical in shape) ? needs to produce 2.5 to 3.0 amps for the gas safety valve to work.
Norton (Rectangular in shape) ? needs to produce 3.2 to 3.7 amps for the gas safety valve to work.

NOTE: There is a UNIVERSAL FLAT BAR igniter on the market as well, that can be used as a substitute if the igniter type that came with your range is not available.

An easy way to determine if you may have an igniter problem is to check BOTH your oven features. If the oven doesn?t light, check the broiler and vice versa. Since both the BROIL manifold and BAKE manifold are fed from the same gas source, but have separate igniters, it?s an easy assumption to make that the igniter may be bad, if one or the other doesn?t light.

The igniter typically goes bad in one of two ways, the igniter either stops glowing completely, or becomes weak over time and doesn?t produce enough current to open the gas safety valve (in this case the igniter will still glow but the oven still won?t light). Longer ignition times can be another symptom of an igniter possibly going bad.

For this solution, however, we?re going to assume you have a bad igniter and need to replace it. Follows these steps:

NOTE: The same method applies to both the broiler and bake manifold.

UNPLUG the range and turn the gas off if you have a local gas cut-out valve (it is recommended that you do).
Open oven door and remove (if possible). Refer to your owner?s manual to see if there are instructions on how to remove the oven door. Some have spring-loaded locking hinges, while others just lift out. If you cannot figure out how to remove the oven door, use care not to lean on the door or put too much weight on it. A common complaint following any kind of oven maintenance is that the oven door doesn?t shut correctly any longer. This is usually caused by bending the hinges or springs coming loose.
Remove the oven racks, and remove the oven pan. (There are usually two screws either in the back or front of the oven holding the pan in place).
Remove the Flame Spreader. This is a metal plate on top of the manifold.
The igniter will be mounted directly to the gas manifold. Follow the wires that lead to igniter. It will either be plugged into a connector, or be connected together with ceramic wire lugs. Your replacement igniter should come with extra ceramic wire lugs. In the event the plug does not match the one on your range, cut the wires and connect using the ceramic wire lugs. DO NOT use standard wire lugs, they are not heat resistant and will melt.
Unplug the old igniter and remove the mounting screw holding it to the gas manifold.
Install new igniter on gas manifold using care not to handle the element on the igniter with your hands. The oil from your hands can cause damage and/or premature failure. The igniter is also considered FRAGILE.
Reconnect the wires using the recommendations mentioned in Step 5.
Plug in the range, turn the gas valve back on and do a visual test by setting the oven temperature to the desired range. Allow 30 ? 90 seconds for the igniter to light the gas. Turn oven off and allow sufficient time to cool. If the oven has only been lit for a minute or so, the cool down period will be brief.
Reinstall the flame spreader, oven pan, and racks. Reinstall door if necessary.


Most igniters cost around $50. Prices will vary with models. I hope this information is helpful.




Good sources to find a replacement igniter include:

searspartsdirect.com*
appliancepartspros.com*
pcappliancerepair.com
repairclinic.com

All these sites offer great service with competitive pricing, so shop all of them for the best price.

* These two sites also provided excellent exploded view diagrams to assist in part identification and assembly.

If you have any questions about this repair, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.


Browse below to find the part or product that you need.:

http://www.apwagner.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=4_170&sort=20a&filter_id=10&alpha_filter_id=0

Jun 17, 2011 | KitchenAid KESC308LSS Electric Kitchen...

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I own a frigidaire es200 electric range MODEL# FEF352DWE my oven wont heat up, indicator lights are working but no heat at all in the oven yet the broiler and stove top works just find just the bottom...


Thanks for choosing FixYa and welcome to the site. If you have a electric oven or a gas oven that won't heat or doesn't heat properly, here are some things you will need to check. The most likely cause of a oven not heating correctly is a defetive heating element. You have two types of heating elements in your oven. The bottom element(s) are the baking elements. The element(s) on the top are the broil elements. If you don't see the bright red glow from the element, chances are they are not working or not working correctly. If a heating element is bad, you need to replace the entire element. If your oven is warm and not correctly hot, one of the elements may be bad. In most ovens, when you preheat, both elements are used. This would make the oven to appear like it is working correctly but it is not. If the elements are not working, they might not be getting power. Test the wires to the elements with a voltage meter to make sure they are getting power before you decide to change them out. Many electrical ovens have a sensor that monitors the oven temperture. Ovens that have this sensor usually contain a digital display on the oven. The sensor could be defective. Those without the sensor use the basic mechanical system to control the oven temperature. You also want to check the thermostat sensing bulb. Make sure the bulb is good and has not come loose. Now, if you have a gas range oven that doesn't heat properly, first, you want to check your bake igniter. It may have burned out or it could be not working properly. It will be located near your burner. It is also possible that you are not getting gas to the burner. If so, it may be the gas safety valve or the igniter. You need to check your selector switch and thermostat as well. They may be defective. Always make sure you test the parts for power with a voltage meter of some type before you decide to change the part. If you have a part that appears to not be working, it may not be getting power because of a bad wire or broken connection. Thank you for your time and thanks for choosing FixYa.

Apr 14, 2011 | Frigidaire PLEF398AC Electric Kitchen...

1 Answer

I have a kenmore oven and the bottom wont heat it get voltage the timer and clock works it clicks off and on like its trying to heat up but does nothing


Thanks for choosing FixYa and welcome. If you have a electric oven or a gas oven that won't heat or doesn't heat properly, here are some things you will need to check. The most likely cause of a oven not heating correctly is a defetive heating element. You have two types of heating elements in your oven. The bottom element(s) are the baking elements. The element(s) on the top are the broil elements. If you don't see the bright red glow from the element, chances are they are not working or not working correctly. If a heating element is bad, you need to replace the entire element. If your oven is warm and not correctly hot, one of the elements may be bad. In most ovens, when you preheat, both elements are used. This would make the oven to appear like it is working correctly but it is not. If the elements are not working, they might not be getting power. Test the wires to the elements with a voltage meter to make sure they are getting power before you decide to change them out. Many electrical ovens have a sensor that monitors the oven temperture. Ovens that have this sensor usually contain a digital display on the oven. The sensor could be defective. Those without the sensor use the basic mechanical system to control the oven temperature. You also want to check the thermostat sensing bulb. Make sure the bulb is good and has not come loose. Now, if you have a gas range oven that doesn't heat properly, first, you want to check your bake igniter. It may have burned out or it could be not working properly. It will be located near your burner. It is also possible that you are not getting gas to the burner. If so, it may be the gas safety valve or the igniter. You need to check your selector switch and thermostat as well. They may be defective. Always make sure you test the parts for power with a voltage meter of some type before you decide to change the part. If you have a part that appears to not be working, it may not be getting power because of a bad wire or broken connection. Thank you for your time and thanks for choosing FixYa.

Apr 08, 2011 | Kenmore 91072 / 91074 / 91079 Electric...

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Oven won't start


Very interesting. The ignitor is working, so that means you have power and the control is working. The safety valve is working, and you have a complete circuit. So why won' t she fire off? Inside the safety valve is a bi-metal that only opens if the resistance is right. The resistance only changes when the ignitor is on. As it gets hotter it changes in resistance. This allows the gas safety valve to release the gas and ignite. Watch this:

May 07, 2010 | Frigidaire FGF326AS Gas Kitchen Range

1 Answer

Fridgidaire gas stove oven glow lights up but oven doesn't come on sometimes then I smell gas, other times it comes right on with no problems


This is a common problem that happens when the oven gas control valve is sticking. This can be caused by a weak hot surface igniter or a defective gas control valve. One thing that you can try(be very careful doing this) is to give the gas control valve a light tap with something hard like a wrench when the oven is turned on,igniter is glowing but the burner is not on. You will need to remove the broiler/storage drawer at the bottom of the oven. Once you pull the drawer out you should see the gas control valve at the back of the range. Try turning on the oven and lightly tapping the valve housing. This may loosen up any debris inside the control valve housing that might be causing the problem. If the oven burner comes on then try completely turning the oven on and back of several times. And when I say completely I mean turn it on after the igniter is not glowing and burner has shut off. This works about 30% of the time. If the burner control valve stick after trying this procedure then it could be the control valve and/or the hot surface igniter defective. The hot surface igniter would need to be disconnected from it's harness and tested with an OHM meter. Most igniters should have a 500 to 700 OHM reading. If you get a reading that is way off then the igniter is defective and replace it. If the igniter tests good then the gas control valve is suspect and replace it. Most appliance parts retailers will test your igniter for free. When the igniter is on it should glow very brightly. If it is dim then that is a sure sign it is bad.

Mar 16, 2010 | Kitchen Ranges

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