Question about Garmin eTrex Legend GPS Receiver

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I'm looking for a location.

Where would I be if the angle between the horison the the North Star is 46 degrees and 23 minutes and the solar noon occus 30.533 minutes before the solar noon in Greenwich, England?

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Somewhere in france, probably near Le Peu de Brossac

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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6ya6ya
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A plane is 48 miles west and 49 miles north of an airport. The pilot wants to fly directly to the airport. What bearing should the pilot take? Answer should be given in degrees and minutes.


Draw the airport. (X marks the spot) Draw the distances from the airport (to scale) to indicate the position of the Plane. Use a protractor to work out the correct angle.

To Calculate:

a=48 b=49 Angle= Tan-1(a/b)

Sep 25, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

You Just Bought an EQUATORIAL Telescope Mount!


Even though we warned you not to do this, you bought one anyway! Beginners should never buy an EQ telescope mount as their first telescope. It's too late now; so I guess we will need to teach you how to use it!

Equatorial mounts move in a way that seems not to very intuitive. Unlike the easy Alt AZ mount which moves up and down and left and right, the EQ mounted telescope seems to move in TWO dissimilar directions at the same time.

Additionally you must first polar align the mount on the North star Polaris before you can use it. SEE! we told you not to buy it!

Here are the steps to roughly polar align the telescope so you can use it. If it is motorized the single Right Ascension motor will keep the sky object inside the eyepiece for long periods of time. If you do not have a Right Ascension motor, the slow motion RA knob can be slowly turned to keep the sky object centered in the eyepiece.

Begin by leveling the mount and tripod. Move the entire mount and tripod so it is pointing roughly to North, as close as possible using the steps below or a compass. Don't forget to adjust for your magnetic deviation. My location's compass reading is about 5 degrees away from true North. This is called magnetic deviation. You can find your location's deviation on the internet. Then proceed with the steps below.

First, adjust the Declination to the latitude for your observing site. Declination is the angle that the scope is pointing UP, and it's the same as your latitude. For example Dallas, Texas is about 32 degrees North latitude, adjust the scope so the small indicator reads 32 degrees. By the way, the North star in Dallas, TX is about 32 degrees above the horizon. Your latitude matches the elevation of Polaris (the North star) above the horizon.

Second, either look through the polar alignment scope buried in the axis of the telescope mount, or look along side the axis, and get the star Polaris lined up in the cross-hair of the polar alignment scope, or as best you can by looking along the side of the mount axis, or lining it up using your compass.. This will put the scope to within about 3/4 of 1 degree of the TRUE North celestial sphere. This is good enough for VISUAL observation, but NOT good enough to do astro-photography..

Adjust the DECLINATION up or down, and move the entire mount left or right until you can see Polaris as indicated above, or it is lined up as close as possible.

Now you are roughly polar aligned. Now you can move the tube around by loosening the Right Ascension lock, and or the Declination lock until your sky object appears in the small finder scope mounted on top of the main telescope tube.(DO NOT MOVE THE MOUNT, and the counter weight should never be higher than the telescope tube) Lock down the scope in both axis and use the fine adjustment RA and DEC knobs to center the target. Again, DO NOT move the mount or tripod. The mount should still be pointing at Polaris.

This web site illustrates this procedure:
http://www.astronomy.net/articles/4/polaralign.html

also this web site

http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes/polaralignmentarticle.cfm

You should be able to keep an object within the field of view of the eyepiece by slowing turning the Right Ascension slow motion control knob-------- IF you are actually accurately polar aligned. Small adjustments may also be needed with the DEC slow motion knob since you are not exactly polar aligned using this rough alignment technique.

However it can be used successfully for visual observation. Your scope will now track the motion of the stars as they move across the sky.

Hope that helps you!

Clear Skies!
TelescopeMan

www.telescopeman.tumblr.com

on Dec 29, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

How do i enter 50deg,25minutes,23seconds into a casio fx-9750 plus


In Run>Mat press the OPTN key, Then F6:> to move to the next page of options. You will see the ANGL tab as on the screen capture (above F5 key.
871a1a05-d4e3-4c86-a14c-538cd8d93852.png

Press F5. You will see what follows.
85ada8ac-117b-4eef-8fec-6323784be30a.png

Type in 50, press the F4 key, 25 then F4, 23 then F4. Press EXE. you get the result in decimal degrees as on the screen capture. To convert from DMS to D.D, or from D.D to DMS, vice-versa, press the F5 key

Jan 05, 2013 | Casio FX-9750GPlus Calculator

2 Answers

How does a compass always point to due north?


"Due North," by definition, is the direction towards the earth's north pole; or, visually at night, towards Polaris, the north star. Therefore, compasses generally do NOT point towards due North but, rather, point towards "magnetic north," as the other responder described, which is a variably located at some distance from True North, depending upon where the north-locating compass is situated on our planet. In most circumstances magnetic North is close enough so that people are willing to accept it as North in general terms. However, depending on your location, and upon seasonal changes caused by Earth's wobbling rotation (called precession) true North can be many degrees off from magnetic (from your compass's) North. In those cases true North must be determined using declination charts, which will tell you how many degrees to add or subtract on you compass in order to determine true North by the Magnetic North your compass is pointing to. For example, if magnetic North is 10 degrees west of true North at your compass's location (that is, your compass is actually pointing 10 degrees to the "left" of North), then you would correct by considering the +10-degree bearing point on your compass dial as True North--and, likewise, add 10 degrees to any bearing line you happen to determine using your compass. You have one other way of finding True North, which is celestially, by sighting towards the Pole star, aka Polaris, aka the North Star...that is, providing that the sky is UNcloudy and unsunny enough for the star to be visible. Of course, that only works for those located in the morthern hemisphere. Those south of the equator have a "south pole" star but it is not as accurate as Polaris in the northern hemisphere.

Jul 09, 2012 | Camping, Backpacking & Hiking

1 Answer

How do i enter 46degrees 15minutes into my ti-36x calculator?


Enter DMS (Degrees/Minutes/Seconds) values as D.MMSSs, using 0s as necessary:
  • D degrees (0-7 digits)
  • . decimal-point separator
  • MM minutes (must be 2 digits)
  • SS seconds (must be 2 digits)
  • s fractional part of a second
For example, enter
  • 46° 15' as 46.15.
  • 179° 9' 2.54" as 179.090254, note the 0s in front of the 9 and 2.
Before using a DMS value in a calculation, you must convert it to decimal with [2nd] [>DD].

Jan 13, 2011 | Texas Instruments TI-36 X Solar Calculator

1 Answer

It is a device used in measuring and sometimes drawing angles?based on trigonometry


Could you mean a sextant? I found other tools of measuring angles at a
distance before I reread your question and noticed it was under
science and astronomy. Most of the following tools are used to measure
angles of stars, planets and locations.


Sextant
=======
"A sextant is a measuring instrument used to measure the angle of
elevation of a celestial object above the horizon. Making this
measurement is known as sighting the object or taking a sight. The
angle, and the time when it was measured, are used to calculate a
position line on a nautical or aeronautical chart. A common use of the
sextant is to sight the sun at noon to find one's latitude. See
celestial navigation for more discussion.

The scale of a sextant has a length of 1/6 of a full circle; 60°,
hence the sextant's name. An octant is a similar device with a shorter
scale, 1/8 of a circle; 45°, which was in use until 1767 when it was
quickly replaced by the sextant. In 1767 the first edition of the
nautical almanac tabulated lunar distances, enabling navigators to
find the current time from the angle between the sun and the moon.
This angle is however sometimes larger than 90°, and thus not possible
to measure with an octant."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sextant

"Practical celestial navigation usually requires a chronometer to
measure time, a sextant to measure the angles, an almanac giving
angular schedules of celestial objects and a set of sight reduction
tables to help perform the math. With sight reduction tables, the only
math required is addition and subtraction. Most people can master the
procedure after a day or two of instruction and practice."
http://www.algebra.com/algebra/about/history/Celestial-navigation.wikipedia

Froogle has many sextants and books for sale:
://www.google.com/froogle?q=sextant&btnG=Search+Froogle

Using the sextant
http://www.jimthompson.net/boating/CelestialNav/CelestNotes/UsingSextant.htm



An angle gauge?
===============
"The gauge is used to tally trees in variable area plot sampling. The
variable plot method is generally faster than fixed area plot
sampling. The gauge usually has basal area per acre factors (BAF) of
5 to 40. The average diameter of the trees to be sampled is what
determines which BAF to use. The angle gauge comes in several shapes
and serves the same purpose as a cruising prism (see cruising prism
below). 2004 price range: $10-$33."
http://ext.nrs.wsu.edu/handtools/tools/measurements/#clin



A clinometer?
=============
"Optical Reading Clinometer
Model No. PM-5/360 PC
Measures:Altitude angle/Percent slope
Heavy-duty clinometer for measuring vertical angles. Clinometer has
two scales: angle in degrees above or below horizontally level or
percent slope. Sighting allows user to simultaneously view object and
read slope."
http://www.pge.com/003_save_energy/003c_edu_train/pec/toolbox/tll/tool_catalog/misc_instru.shtml

"Measuring with a Clinometer

A clinometer is a tool that can help you to measure the angular height
of the Moon more accurately than with your fists."
http://www.learner.org/channel/workshops/lala/moonjactivities.html


A protractor?
=============
"Use tape to hinge two rulers together end to end at a 90
degree angle. Hold one ruler so that it points straight out
to the horizon and the other one points to the straight up
to the zenith. Tape a protractor to the rulers so that the
base is on the horizon line and the zenith line cuts the 90
degree mark.

To determine the altitude of the North Star where you live,
hold the rulers horizontally at eye level. Look at the North
Star and move the ruler to point at it.

The number of degrees or altitude of the North Star can be
read on the protractor."
http://spikesworld.spike-jamie.com/science/astronomy/c421-03.html


A transit?
==========
"These units are for the serious builder or contractor who requires
greater accuracy. These instruments are designed with a heavy-duty
dome shaped head that holds a double ball bearing center, giving the
user 5 minute readouts. Model 300B has a 1° vertical arc and two
leveling vials. Units use a 3-1/2 x 8 thread."
http://historywired.si.edu/object.cfm?ID=186

http://www.contractor-books.com/CB/Optical_Levels/Optical_Levels.htm?source=google


"Set up for the class five angle measuring exercises. Get each
participant to measure each angle. Rule out any clearly wrong
measurments; average the remainder. Now score each participant on how
little his/ her readings vary from the class's average.

An alternative test for your transit is to go to a large field. Along
one edge, mark perhaps 5 locations all in a straight line, perhaps 50
feet apart. (Use a longer distance if you can measure it accurately,
and space allows. (You can see they are in line by looking along it!)
About 150 feet from the baseline, at a point perpendicular to it's
middle, stick a pole in the ground. (The location does not have to be
precise.) Now measure angles between the baseline and the pole at each
of your locations. Next, prepare a map of what you have measured.
Start by drawing a line on a piece of paper. Mark 5 evenly spaced
points along it. Draw the angles you recorded. The lines going away
from the baseline should all met at one point if your readings are
accurate.

Remember: Any measuring device must be able to return the same reading
every time it measures the same angle, weight, length, etc. It must
give the answer in usable units.

With the transit, a major element in achieving success will be your
skill in devising something that will allow you to point directly at
the distant objects which define the direction of the two arms of the
angle.

How you read off how far around your pointer has swung will be another
critical area."
http://www.arunet.co.uk/tkboyd/mm1t.htm


Kamals, Quadrants, and Astrolabes
==================================
http://www.jimthompson.net/boating/CelestialNav/CelestNotes/UsingSextant.htm

If none of the above is the tool you had in mind, please do not rate
ths answer.
Search Terms
============
sextant
astrolabe
protractor
tools for measuring angles + distance
measuring angles + astronomy

Dec 04, 2010 | Google Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to switch from the decimal degree to degrees, minutes, seconds


Keys 1. I displays the following menu that lets you change the angle mode setting to DEG, RAD, and GRD without affecting the value in the display. DEG Sets degree mode. RAD Sets radian mode. GRD Sets gradient mode. The default setting is DEG. 2. = displays a menu that lets you specify the unit of an angle. º Specifies degrees. å Specifies minutes. æ Specifies seconds. r Specifies radians. g Specifies gradients. DMS Lets you convert an angle from decimal degrees to DMS notation. Notes · The examples on the transparency masters assume all default settings. · Angles with a trig function ignore the angle mode setting and display results in the original unit. Otherwise, angles (without a trig function) are converted and displayed according to the angle mode setting. · You enter decimal-degree angles the same as you would any other number. · For decimal/DMS conversions, the calculator interprets all values as degrees, regardless of the angle-unit setting. · DMS angles are entered as º (degrees), ´ (minutes), and ´´ (seconds You watched 2 videos that were 2:05 (2 hours and 5 minutes) and 1:46 (1 hour and 46 minutes) in length. How long did you watch videos? = Press Display 2 = ¡ å æ r g & - DEG < 2¡ DEG 5 =" ¡ å æ r g & - DEG <T 1 = < 2¡ 5å + 1¡ DEG 46=" << 2¡ 5å + 1¡ 46å ' 3.85 DEG =! % ¾DMS ---- DEG << Ans ¾ DMS ' 3¡ 51å 0æ DEG Degrees, Minutes, and Seconds to Decimal © 1999 TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INCORPORATED TI-30X ùS: A Guide for Teachers 96 How much is 2/3 of an hour in hours, minutes, and seconds? = Press Display 2 N 3 2®3 DEG =! % ¾DMS ---- DEG << 2®3 ¾ DMS ' 0¡ 40å 0æ DEG

Aug 19, 2010 | Texas Instruments TI-30 XIIS Calculator

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