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To get the code of my program.

Read current(l_Amp)flowing through a cable and the resistance(R_Ohm)of the cable.Compute and output the power loss(P_watt)through the cable.P=RI^2(USING C PROGRAM)

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Posted on Jan 14, 2009

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What is my current rate


Which current are you referring to ??......



If you think of an electrical device as a piece of plumbing, voltage is the amount of water that you send down into the pipe, resistance is the pipe's relative width or narrowness, and current is the speed with which the water flows.
Power measures the water's relative difficulty or ease making its way through the pipe.
You relate all these values to one another using a common set of physics equations known as Ohm's law.
If you need to calculate electricity's current flow, you'll need to have at least two of the three values -- voltage, resistance or power -- listed above.

Calculate current flow using voltage and resistance.
According to Ohm's law, you can express electricity's current in amps as a ratio of its voltage in volts to the resistance of the device it's flowing through in ohms -- I = E/R, respectively.
For example, if you want to know the current flow of 220 V of electricity as it flows through a laptop computer with 80 ohms of resistance, you would simply plug these values into the equation as follows: I = 220/80 = 2.75 amps.
Calculate current flow using power and resistance.
Ohm's law also states that electrical current, "I," is equal to the square root of the power dissipated as it travels through the device divided by that device's resistance.
If a light bulb dissipates 80 watts of power and has a resistance of 55 ohms, you can calculate the electricity's current as follows: I = sqrt(80/55) = sqrt(1.4545) = 1.20 amps.

Calculate current flow using power and voltage.
If you have a space heater which dissipates 420 watts of power when it takes in 120 V of electricity, Ohm's law states you can calculate this electricity's current using the equation "I = P/E." For this example, compute current like so: I =420/120 = 3.5 amps.

http://www.the12volt.com/ohm/ohmslaw.asp

Aug 13, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Can i use rg6 on my dx 949 radio that i am using as a base?


RG6 Cable is a 75 ohm cable and is generally used in residential settings for UHF/VHF off air antenna, cable & satellite TV signal feed lines.

The transmitter you have - like most CB, Amateur, etc. radios ant associated antennas have 50 ohm outputs and outputs. This is for a reason. Ohm's law says Maximum Power Transfer occurs when Resistance In equals Resistance Out. In order to achieve this, all the components must have matching (or close to it) resistance values. Inserting a 75 Ohm cable in a "balanced" 50 Ohm circuit can cause a mismatch or high SWR. There are ways around this - but it's too deep for here.

Your best bet would be to either try the RG6 and adjust the antenna for lowest SWR, or if unable to get it down to an acceptable value (less than 2:1 is the worst I'd accept - but 1.5:1 is significantly better), purchase a high quality 50 Ohm coaxial cable assembly instead. Good luck!

Jan 04, 2012 | Galaxy Radios DX-949 40-Channels Base CB...

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Keeps shutting off automatically and flashes Protect before it shuts down ??


FIRST DISS-CONNECT POWER FROM RECEIVER.... DO NOT ATTEMPT ANY SERVICE / TROUBLESHOOTING PROCEDURES TO ELECTRICAL DEVICES PRIOR TO REMOVING ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Now that the power cord is unplugged we can start. We shall start this repair by doing the easiest tests/checks first. That DOES NOT MEAN that just because the test is easy, its not very important.... every recommendation to follow is JUST as important as the next! (even if what is asked to be checked sounds un-important... its not! Follow this advice and YOU WILL RESOLVE YOUR ISSUE! TRUST ME... YOU WILL FIX THIS issue & before the days over.... SMILE & BE HAPPY! OK...... lets get started) First lets Check the power cord... unpluged? Sure hope so! Now the first thing that you have to do is check ALL the speaker connections at both ends!!!!!!!! (@ speaker & Receiver) Be certain ALL connections are tight & that NO strands of wire are shorting out the connections by touching each other...... the ends of ALL speaker wires must be seperate from each other at all times!!!! Each wire must ONLY be connected to one post/connector!!!!! Only ONE speaker should be connected to each terminal.... do not connect additional speakers to connections at any time!!!!!!!!!!! ONLY ONE can be applied to EACH OUTPUT TERMINAL!!!!!! If the speakers your using are fuse protected check fuses or circuit breakers accordingly. One open circuit (unconnected output terminal) or shorted (wires touching together) will immediatelly trigger receiver to SHUT DOWN!!!!!!! Receiver MUST have a load (speaker) connected to each speaker output to operate properly. Should all wires be found connected properly after checking at both speaker terminals & receiver terminals & problem is still accuring after reapplying power....... additional resistance checks must be made using an OHM Meter (available at most harware stores). If one of the speakers being used has burned out / gone bad / broke...... the only way to determine this condition is via a resistance measurment. Disconnect the speaker wire from the back of each speaker prior to doing resistance check!!! (a false reading will be observed if the speaker wire is still connected during this test) Now touch each of the two speaker terminals with one of the meter leads (the meter must be set to OHMS or RESISTANCE during this test for proper reading). The resistance reading observed should be NO LESS THAN 3 OHMS & NO MORE THAN 10 OHMS !!!!!!!!! Should the resistance/ohm's value of any speaker being used / connected to the receiver be found by the OHM Meter to read LESS than 3 OHMS = speaker shorted... MUST be replaced! Should the resistance/ohm's value of any speaker being used / connected to the receiver be found by the OHM Meter to read MORE than 10 OHMS = speaker open.... Must be replaced! Connecting damaged speakers to any receiver for a prolonged period of time WILL DAMAGE RECEIVER!!!!!!! Speaker resistance MUST be between 3 & 10 ohms to avoid damage to output transistors in receiver.... when receiver senses less than a resistance of 3 or more of a resistance than 10 @ ANY speaker terminal during operation................. IMMEDIATE AUTOMATIC SHUTDOWN OF RECEIVER WILL OCCURE!!!!!!! You've got a bad speaker or a loose speaker wire or a shorted speaker wire...... check each of your speaker connections/terminals & you'll find your problem! When you do find a loose or shorted wire associated with the speakers......... you'll have found your problem! Trust me.... you CAN do it!!!! and when you do... you will SMILE !!!!!!!! & be HAPPY!!!!!!!
GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!

May 14, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Whats the max power of the system


paulcreber19, All audio amplifiers have their outputs measured for power output using a pure sinewave input of 1khz. With the outputs loaded with the appropriate noninductive, noncapacitve, purely resistive load (1% tolerance load resistors), a RMS voltage reading is made just prior to driving the amplifier into distortion or peak clipping of the output waveform. Knowing the RMS voltage and the OHMIC value of the load you will be able to calculate the RMS current (I) and then calculate the power using variations of OHMS LAW to find RMS power output. To calculate the absolute PEAK power (a measurement not used for rating audio amps anymore) you simply multiply the RMS power by 2.828 to arrive at PEAK pwr. So, your question should have been what is the power output per channel @ 1khz sinewave and less than 1% distortion with an 8 ohm, 16 ohm, 32 ohm load applied to the output. I'm pretty sure this is correct. If not, please let me know where I screwed up.
Bye for now. 12fixlouie

Oct 25, 2009 | Sony Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Sony STR-DB940 Receiver Speaker Impedance Question


Whats the rating on the Plasma? How many watts at 4 ohms? If the plasma is rated 100 w at 8 ohm... hanging a 3.4 ohm load would put a lot of strain on the plasma's output amp. At 3.4 ohm the amp would be trying to delive close to 200 watts at full power. But it depends on how hot you normally run the volumn. Remember an amplifier output is AC volts. 1 ohm of resistance is close to a dead short. The amplifier would have to work its *** off to supply that type of power and would probably burn the output op-amps. If the outputs burn & it pumps any DC current through the speaker wire..the speakers would be toast...if not catch on fire. Try to keep the speaker load at or very cloe to the plasma's output load rating. Also if the plasma doesn't state it will handle loads down to 2 ohms...It probably won't.
Gene

Mar 02, 2009 | Sony STR-DB940 Receiver

1 Answer

Onkyo TX-DS777 Problem biwiring ohm ?


"Biwiring' is not an accepted term; I suspect you mean 'parallel.'
There are three different ways to connect loads (that is all your speakers are to the amplifier); 
Assume that the speaker outputs are marked + (plus) and - (minus). 
Series - if you connect a + to a - which is then further connected to another plus + which is then connected to another minus, this is a series connecton and if doing this with speakers, each load (let's assume 4 ohms) is additive; in other words 4 + 4 + 4 = a 12 ohm load. The current flowing through each load is identical.
Parallel - In this case, all the + are connected together and then to the + on the speaker connection. All of the - are connected and then also to the minus of the speaker output. In this case, all of the current is shared and not necessarily equally; the lowest load impedance (this is a complex combination of resistance, inductance and capacitance) will draw the most current. If you have all 4 ohm loads, they will all draw the same amount of current. If you have a mix of loads, the final result will be lower than the lowest of the loads.
If a graphical representation is better for understanding, go here:
Series & parallel circuits 
In your case, if the output is specified as (for example) 4 ohms and you parallel two 8 ohm speakers, it will be a 'matched load' and safe for the amplifier. If you add a third speaker of 4 ohms, you will have a load well under 4 ohms, below the rating of your amp, and you risk damaging the amplifier if the output is not adequately protected against mismatches.
For your situation, you should look at the math on the Wikipedia link and avoid causing your amp to fail.

Feb 16, 2009 | Onkyo TX-DS777

2 Answers

4 ohm and 8 ohm speakers


You can plug in higher ohm speakers , the higher the ohm the higher the resistance is, it is a danger when you plug lower ohm speakers into a higer ohm Amp , at a high volume that will cause them to blow , the center speaker would be fine to use a higer ohm speaker , your best choice is to buy a Active Subwoofer, which means the sub has it's own power supply , and u can blast the thing as much as u like , thn u can turn the bass down on all the other speaker's so u can play it louder , and have the sub turned up has high as u like , this is the best way to get great sound with high volume , buy a Active sub woofer , any active subwoofer is ok , a active sub woofer has its own volume and inputs on the speaker ,

Dec 09, 2007 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How to


First of all, make sure your amp is bridgeable. There are a few ways to bridge subs. series: hook one wire from the negative on the left amp output (or whichever is labeled on amp for bridged)to left sub negative. left sub positive to right sub negative, then right sub positive to the amp positive output.(like a big loop through both speakers) parallel: both speakers get their own set of wires, both negatives go to the bridge negative terminal, and both positives go to the positive bridge terminal. Series-parallel: A combination of the two. say two speakers in series, and one hooked up alone, but all to the same amp outputs. Bridging your amp/speakers basically lowers the resistance of the circuit and makes more current flow, more power, louder, harder hit. In series, it also makes both speakers do exactly the same thing, instead of "stereo sound" or L/R differences. What you're probably looking to do is Bridge in parallel. That will drop the resistance of the circuit the lowest, allow the amp to put out the most amount of current to the speakers, and allow your bass to hit the hardest. If your amp only has one output, hook up the same way as above. Just see what resistance your amp is stable down to. If down to 1 ohm, no worries. if stable only to 2 or 4 ohms, you may want to bridge in series to be safe. That will cause the resistance to go up, and will not pull as much current through the amp. The whole time, just remember Bridgeing and higher current mean HEAT so watch your amp. I hope this helped.

Oct 31, 2007 | Pioneer TS-W301R Car Subwoofer

3 Answers

Amp power


Make shure with an ohm meter that the primary and secondary windings have very little resistance on the main trasformer,then check voltage in trasformer and out from transformer...BIGRED

Sep 02, 2007 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Hooking up 2 speakers to 1 speakon output


Power Output (1 kHz*) Stereo Bridge-Mono 8 Ohm 4 Ohm 8 Ohm XLS 802 500W 800W 1600W XLS 602 380W 600W 1200W XLS 402 300W 450W 900W XLS 202 200W 300W 600W *1 kHz Power: refers to maximum average power in watts at 1 kHz with 0.5% THD. It depends on the impedence of the speakers. Carfull as you could burn up this amp if you exceed the resistance rating on it. Go here on all of the specs of this model of crown amps. http://www.crownaudio.com/amp_htm/xlsspec.htm Good Luck

Mar 27, 2007 | Crown XLS202A 2-Channel Amplifier

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