Question about Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

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Film speed setting

Hi, For some reason, no matter what type of film I use, my F60 displays "25" as film speed. I used only ISO 200 films until now and didn't experience this problem until a month or so ago. I went through the manual and forum discussions but I can't find any reference on this (the trouble is the film speed is automatically set, of course...). Anybody have an idea on how to solve this? I'd greatly appreciate some feedback :) Cheers, Oana

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Film speed is normally automatically set by small contacts that touch the checker pattern on the film cassette. It is most likely that these are not contacting properly, or there is a fault with the circuit that controls these.

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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ISO DX ERR


What speed film? Does the roll have the DX markings (the black-and-silver rectangles)? If it doesn't, what happens if you set the film speed manually?

Mar 22, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I can record, i can take pictures inside or when it is night but i can not take pictures with the light of the day or when there is a strong light. I can see from the lcd monitor the icon bute when i take...


You have the ISO Setting set too high. This is the setting that in a film camera was called 'film speed'. The higher the ISO, the better it will take pictures in low light. Yours may be set to 3,800 ISO, when it needs to be on 200 or 400. The light during the day is bleaching out the sensor and that is what you are seeing on the screen. Also the higher the ISO, the more grain you will see in images.

Understanding ISO - A Beginner's Guide - Photography Life

https://photographylife.com > Photography Tutorials
Sep 4, 2017 - The lower the ISO number, the less sensitive it is to the light, while a higher ISO number increases the sensitivity of your camera. The component within your camera that can change sensitivity is called "image sensor" or simply "sensor".

Film speed - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_speed Film speed. ... Film speed is the measure of a photographic film's sensitivity to light, determined by sensitometry and measured on various numerical scales, the most recent being the ISO system. A closely related ISO system is used to describe the relationship between exposure and output image lightness in digital cameras ... ‎Film speed measurement ... · ‎Film sensitivity and grain · ‎Digital camera ISO speed ...

What is ISO (Film Speed)? - I STILL SHOOT FILM

istillshootfilm.org/post/592532284/what-is-iso-film-speed As I explained in How Film Works, photographic film is made up of millions of light-sensitive silver halide crystals, which we call grain. The lower the film speed, ... film iso explain in digital photography Google Search

Oct 31, 2017 | Canon PowerShot Pro1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Im the one with the Maxxum 3xi iso problem ... Our teacher gave us film with 400iso but we have to change the iso to 100 to shoot the roll..


If you use DX-coded film between 25-5000, the camera sets the ISO automatically to match the film. If you use non-DX-coded film, the ISO is automatically set to 100 ISO.

Jan 13, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

I have a ricoh kr-30sp camera will not come on and what kind of film do I use


With the camera turned on, look in the viewfinder. Down on the bottom right side is an LCD display, if it's blank then your camera probably has dead batteries. It takes 2 x CR1/3N or 4 x SR44.

Your film accepts 35mm negative film or 35mm transparency (aka slide) film. It will accept any ISO from 12 to 3200, but in practice all you'll usually need are ISO 100, ISO 200 or ISO 400. You choose the film based upon lighting conditions and the lenses you'll be using, but in general you'll use ISO 100 if shooting mainly outdoors in daylight, ISO 400 if shooting in low light or with a telephoto lens, and ISO 200 is a general all-rounder good for most things. ISO is usually referred to as film speed as higher numbers need less exposure than lower numbers but the trade-off is a less detailed image.

To load film into your camera and to set the camera to match the film ISO setting refer to this link to the manual provided by Norman Butkus. The manual will also guide you through all other aspects of operating your camera.

I hope that I have fully answered your question, but if not please add a comment and I shall respond in due course. If your question has been answered, then please let me know by taking a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 15, 2010 | Ricoh KR-30SP 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Can I use non dx film with this camera?


Since it has automatic ISO setting from 25 to 3200, you should use DX-film. However, most of the auto-setting cameras (in fact all I have come across) default to ISO 100 or 200 when using non-DX films. Consult your user manual to confirm which one.

Dec 05, 2009 | Ricoh GR-21 35mm Point and Shoot Camera

2 Answers

What is ISO?


It is the Film speed to measure of a photographic film’s sensitivity to light, determined by sensitometry and measured on various numerical scales, the most recent being the ISO system. Relatively insensitive film, with a correspondingly lower speed index requires more exposure to light to produce the same image density as a more sensitive film, and is thus commonly termed a slow film. Highly sensitive films are correspondingly termed fast films.

ISO numbers usually double up, and each step gives one more stop of light. Common numbers are: 50 – 100 – 160 – 200 – 400 – 800 – 1600 and higher.

Take a look at these links for some good explanations of what ISO is in phtography.

http://www.all-things-photography.com/iso.html
http://www.photography-tips.co.uk/?p=35
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_speed
http://www.ophrysphotography.co.uk/pages/highiso.htm
http://www.videojug.com/film/digital-photography-tips-iso-and-light-settings

Nov 07, 2009 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pictures come out very grainy


Most likely, you've set the ISO value higher than necessary for most circumstances. You may have done this deliberately to catch some fast action, or you accidentally hit the ISO button without realizing it. If you reset to lower ISO settings, your graininess problem will probably disappear.

The faster the "film speed", whether you're using real film or a digital camera, the more grainy the pictures will be. ISO is the film speed. The ISO speed is set by pressing the ISO button (just above the "FUNC SET" button); it cycles thru AUTO, HI, 80,100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, then back to AUTO. If you've set the camera to AUTO on the control wheel opn the top of the camera, then you can only select ISO of AUTO or HI (which is slightly faster than AUTO).

The higher ISO settings are useful in low light conditions or to catch fast action, but those higher settings should not be used otherwise because of the increased graininess.

I hope this helps you.

Oct 19, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A540 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Film speed override?


Press and hold the ISO button on the top left and rotate the command dial on the right until the film speed appears on the display. Release the ISO button and the speed is set.

In case your instructor hasn't told you, IR light is just below visible light on the spectrum and has a longer wavelength. Therefore, IR light will focus behind the film plane for a given setting. I.e., if you preset the lens to focus at 10 feet, the IR light will focus at a shorter distance. Unless your lens has a distance mark for IR, I would limit my shooting to longer distances and smaller f-stops to use the depth-of -field to compensate. When you are in focus for IR, the image in your viewfinder will be out of focus. The closer you are to the subject, the more out of focus the image will appear at the correct focus setting.

Sep 07, 2008 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed


Did You ever use a SLR back in the stone age when all we had was film?
Film was/is rated with a ISO number, the higher the number the faster the film.
Fast film had fewer and larger grains of silver iodide, (the particles that changed tone, color etc.when exposed to light), therefore it took less light to take a picture.

The down side was a increase in grain. Large grains meant that blow ups, 8x10, 11x14, posters, etc were not as sharp,
as with slow ( low ISO film)
Most outdoor photos had plenty of light so the film had more grains ( high ISO) to capture the available light, and the result was a much sharper image.

Portrait photography used very very slow film ( your 50 ISO setting) but in a studio you had all the artificial lighting you needed, so your portrait came out with very fine detail.

Now the FE-280 does not have a shutter setting, but we can compensate by changing the ISO setting, and the overall effect will be.
Fastest= 1600 ISO for very little light and poorest picture quality.
Slowest=50 ISO for plenty of light and the highest picture quality

200 ISO was the most popular because it worked well outdoors and indoors with a flash, with very good overall picture quality.

400 ISO was a good choice for gloomy days and medium lighting conditions.

Your ISO settings on the FE-280 will have a similar effect.
My best advice is to play around with the different settings until you develop a knack for it, we used to use light meters and a lot of guesswork, quite expensive when you had to buy film and pay for processing.

OK enough history. heres how....
Turn dial to (P) PROGRAMAUTO
Press (MENU)
The camera menu in center is bracketed, Press (OK)
Scroll down one bar on the on screen menu to (ISO)
Press (OK)
Scroll up or down to desired ISO
Press (OK)
TAH DA !

All other functions will be automatic or any other setting that you might choose..
If you change the dial and later go back again to (P) it will retain your selected ISO setting, which is displayed, on screen.

I hope I was help full, and you enjoy some of the special effects that you will now be able try.
By the way... good taste in cameras.
Best regards, Paul

May 18, 2008 | Olympus FE-280 Digital Camera

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