Question about Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

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Film speed setting

Hi, For some reason, no matter what type of film I use, my F60 displays "25" as film speed. I used only ISO 200 films until now and didn't experience this problem until a month or so ago. I went through the manual and forum discussions but I can't find any reference on this (the trouble is the film speed is automatically set, of course...). Anybody have an idea on how to solve this? I'd greatly appreciate some feedback :) Cheers, Oana

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Re: Film speed setting

Film speed is normally automatically set by small contacts that touch the checker pattern on the film cassette. It is most likely that these are not contacting properly, or there is a fault with the circuit that controls these.

Posted on Dec 12, 2008

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What speed film? Does the roll have the DX markings (the black-and-silver rectangles)? If it doesn't, what happens if you set the film speed manually?

Mar 22, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Iso led keeps flashing on my eos 10s

clean the iso detect pins in the film chamber, and check to make sure they are not bent

Jan 05, 2013 | Canon EOS-10S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How do I know which ISO to set with the shutter speed?

ISO is the speed rating of the film. Both the film box and the film canister should have the ISO rating printed on them. Normally you would just use that number, unless you specifically want to push- or pull-process the film.

Jan 20, 2011 | Vivitar V3800N Zoom 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a ricoh kr-30sp camera will not come on and what kind of film do I use

With the camera turned on, look in the viewfinder. Down on the bottom right side is an LCD display, if it's blank then your camera probably has dead batteries. It takes 2 x CR1/3N or 4 x SR44.

Your film accepts 35mm negative film or 35mm transparency (aka slide) film. It will accept any ISO from 12 to 3200, but in practice all you'll usually need are ISO 100, ISO 200 or ISO 400. You choose the film based upon lighting conditions and the lenses you'll be using, but in general you'll use ISO 100 if shooting mainly outdoors in daylight, ISO 400 if shooting in low light or with a telephoto lens, and ISO 200 is a general all-rounder good for most things. ISO is usually referred to as film speed as higher numbers need less exposure than lower numbers but the trade-off is a less detailed image.

To load film into your camera and to set the camera to match the film ISO setting refer to this link to the manual provided by Norman Butkus. The manual will also guide you through all other aspects of operating your camera.

I hope that I have fully answered your question, but if not please add a comment and I shall respond in due course. If your question has been answered, then please let me know by taking a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 15, 2010 | Ricoh KR-30SP 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Problem with loading film in my Nikon F60.

Draw the film all the way to the receiving spool. There's an 'eye' inside the film compartment to check that the film is loaded. When the film is not correctly loaded the camera thinks it's empty and rewinds the film.

Aug 08, 2009 | Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How so I inaert film

I'm not familiar with your exact model so what follows is generic to many film SLR cameras and assumes that the camera is already empty:-

Open the back of the camera by pulling upwards the rewind crank on the top left hand end of the camera (as viewed from behind). The back of the camera should pop open a little, open it all the way.

Before fitting the film, check if the film can is DX coded. It will have DX printed on it somewhere if it is, but will also have a large area bare metal squares interspaced with printed black squares or rectangles. if the film is not DX coded then look for an ISO number, ASA number or DIN number and note it somewhere.

Drop the roll of film into the space at the left of the camera, and push the rewind crank back down to secure the film canister. Pull out the film leader across to the right hand end of the camera. Often there are printed instructions or diagrams showing what to do. Your camera probably has an easy loading system in which you pull the film leader until it's level with a printed line and then close the camera back until it clicks.

Turn the camera on, normally it will staert whirring as it autoloads the fil onto the take up spool. If successful the number one will appear in the film counter display within a few seconds. If not then open the camera back and try again.

What you do next depends on whether the film is DX coded or not. There will either be a dial or a menu item which allows you to set the film speed, for DX coded films set the control to DX or to AUTO. If the film is a rare non DX-coded one then you need to set the speed manually. Select the correct ISO number in the menu. If your film had an ASA number then use it as an ISO number and if it had a DIN number then look up DIN to ISO conversion online.

If this has solved your problem then please return the favour by rating my answer, thanks.

Jun 30, 2009 | Minolta Dynax 404Si Film Camera

1 Answer

How do i take photos indoors/ what settings do i use?


well first how far away from the stage will you be?
will you be using available light or a flash unit?
shutter speed and f-stop depend on the light source and film speed. (iso )
the faster the film the less you have to use flash, the lower the f-stop the less depth of field you have, the kind of flash is important, most flash units are good for only around 20 ft.
i would use a high speed film and not use flash. flash will kill any colored lights. try to keep the f-stop at least f/8 and the shutter speed no less than 1/60 sec. have fun.

Dec 13, 2008 | Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

3 Answers


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Film speed override?

Press and hold the ISO button on the top left and rotate the command dial on the right until the film speed appears on the display. Release the ISO button and the speed is set.

In case your instructor hasn't told you, IR light is just below visible light on the spectrum and has a longer wavelength. Therefore, IR light will focus behind the film plane for a given setting. I.e., if you preset the lens to focus at 10 feet, the IR light will focus at a shorter distance. Unless your lens has a distance mark for IR, I would limit my shooting to longer distances and smaller f-stops to use the depth-of -field to compensate. When you are in focus for IR, the image in your viewfinder will be out of focus. The closer you are to the subject, the more out of focus the image will appear at the correct focus setting.

Sep 07, 2008 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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