Question about AUVIO 2-In/1-Out HDMI Selector Switch with Remote Control

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I have a 1500397 adapter and am attempting to hook my lap top to my HDTV

I have checked my connections which seem pretty simple single connection on each end I have it so I am getting sound on the TV and the Home screen on my TV with the DVD playing on the lap top.

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How to turn on rgb from lap top to tv.


In order to connect your laptop to your TV using RGB, you need an RGB adapter. RGB is also known as component video; it breaks up a video signal into red, green and blue. laptops do not have RGB outputs. However, many laptops have VGA, DVI or HDMI outputs. An RGB adapter connects the single VGA, DVI, or HDMI cable to an RGB cable, which is actually three different cables tied together. INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Connect either the VGA, DVI or HDMI (in the order of increasing video quality) cable to the VGA, DVI or HDMI port on your laptop, depending on what is available. 2. Connect the other end of the cable to the side of the RGB adapter with the single input. 3. Connect the RGB cables to the red, green and blue ports on the other side of the RGB adapter. 4. Connect the other end of the RGB cables to an available component input on the back of the TV. 5. Tune the TV to the component video input you used through your television's menu. 6. Turn on your laptop. The laptop should now display on your TV screen.

May 30, 2011 | Computers & Internet

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Connect you HDTV to your Mac.


One of the first things you may notice about your new big-screen HDTV is that it has more connections for video than your old TV ever dreamed about. It probably has two or three HDMI connections, maybe a DVI connector, a VGA connector, and at least one component video connection. And those are just the connections most commonly used for high definition.
It’s shame to let all those connections go to waste. Your Mac just happens to be sitting nearby; why not hook it up to your new HDTV? It's actually a pretty easy task. A few lucky souls won't even need an adapter; for the rest of us, at least one adapter will be necessary.
Pick the Right HDTV Port For best quality, your HDTV's HDMI or DVI ports are the preferred connection method. Both are capable of the same digital quality. The only practical differences are the style of the connector and the fact that HDMI supports video and audio in a single connection. If it has one, another option is to use your HDTV’s VGA port. The VGA connection isn't as good as the HDMI or DVI method, but as long as your TV supports full resolution via the VGA port, you'll be hard pressed to notice the difference. Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, Mac Mini Mac Pros, MacBook Pros, and Mac Minis have standard DVI connectors. Mac Minis and MacBook Pros have a single DVI port; Mac Pros have at least two DVI ports. If your HDTV has a free DVI port, then all you need is a standard DVD cable; no adapter is necessary. But in all likelihood, you'll need to connect your Mac to your HDTV using either an HDMI or VGA connection; both options require an adapter. If you choose VGA, you can use the adapter that came with your Mac. If you choose HDMI, you'll need a simple adapter, which is available from multiple sources. The adapter may be a cable with a DVI connector on one end and an HDMI connector on the other, or it may be a small adapter that has both types of connectors, but no cable. Either type will work fine. iMac, MacBook iMacs and MacBooks have a mini DVI connector for hooking up external monitors or TVs. You'll need at least one adapter, maybe even two. At a minimum, you'll need a mini DVI-to-DVI adapter. You may also need a DVI-to-HDMI or DVI-to-VGA adapter, depending on which port on the HDTV you choose for the connection. Make the Connection Once you determine which, if any, adapters you need, and have the necessary cable to reach from your Mac to the HDTV, turn off both the HDTV and the Mac. Connect the cable between the Mac and the HDTV. Turn the HDTV back on first. It doesn't need to be set to the connection the Mac is on, but it must be powered up first, so that when it boots, your Mac can recognize the TV and the resolution it needs. Once the HDTV is powered up, turn on the Mac. Your Mac should recognize the format and resolution of the TV, and automatically select the native resolution of the TV for running the video. In a few seconds, you should see the Mac desktop on the HDTV. Over or Underscan You may notice that the Mac's desktop appears to be slightly larger than the HDTV's screen (its edges are cut off); this is called overscan. Or, you may notice that the desktop doesn't occupy all of the HDTV's screen real estate (there are dark areas around the edges); this is called underscan. You can usually correct either issue by making adjustments on the HDTV. Check the HDTV's manual for information on making scan-related adjustments. They may be called overscan, underscan, dot-by-dot, or pixel-by-pixel. If your HDTV has a dot-by-dot or pixel-by-pixel capability, give this a try; it should eliminate any over or underscan issues. Some HDTVs only offer these special scan controls on specific inputs, so be sure to connect to the corresponding input on your HDTV. Time to Watch a Movie Once you have your Mac and HDTV working together, it's time to kick back and watch a video from your Mac. Be sure to check out the QuickTime HD trailers for a sense of what HD and your Mac is capable of. Enjoy!

on Feb 22, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How do I Connect a Dell Latitude E6500 to a Sanyo Television


Check your ports on the lap top see if you have s video or hdmi or dvi or VGA the best is hdmi if you have that get a cable for either one of you connections also match connections from the lap top to what you have for your TV more than likely if they are both fairly new you should have hdmi connections for both get a cable that is long enough. I get my cables at amazon.com their prices are the bomb.
Connect them together both ends to lap top and to tv then make sure that you have a line in jack stereo jack with RCA ends hook that to the back of your tv and your lap top in stereo jack even better to your surround sound system. Set your TV to AVI 1 or 2 or DVI or whichever is your connection start a movie on the lap top and turn your sound on and see if you have a picture on your screen you should have the same thing as what is showing on your monitor on your lap top. Adjust settings and have fun!

Jan 08, 2011 | Dell Latitude E6500 Laptop

1 Answer

I have just bought an n wireless router to take to spain with me however i only have a lap top and your instructions seem to say to connect to a computer tower.can i do it directly to lap top


Yes, your laptop PC will work fine. Normally you need to be sure the laptop is on the same network as the router and connect to its Ethernet (LAN) port via the built in wired network adapter on your laptop to configure.

Mar 05, 2010 | Belkin N Wireless Modem-Router F5D8633au4A

2 Answers

Trouble connecting Insignia HDTV 19" to my macbook pro


One of the first things you may notice about your new big-screen HDTV is that it has more connections for video than your old TV ever dreamed about. It probably has two or three HDMI connections, maybe a DVI connector, a VGA connector, and at least one component video connection. And those are just the connections most commonly used for high definition.
It’s shame to let all those connections go to waste. Your Mac just happens to be sitting nearby; why not hook it up to your new HDTV? It's actually a pretty easy task. A few lucky souls won't even need an adapter; for the rest of us, at least one adapter will be necessary.
Pick the Right HDTV PortFor best quality, your HDTV's HDMI or DVI ports are the preferred connection method. Both are capable of the same digital quality. The only practical differences are the style of the connector and the fact that HDMI supports video and audio in a single connection.If it has one, another option is to use your HDTV’s VGA port. The VGA connection isn't as good as the HDMI or DVI method, but as long as your TV supports full resolution via the VGA port, you'll be hard pressed to notice the difference.Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, Mac MiniMac Pros, MacBook Pros, and Mac Minis have standard DVI connectors. Mac Minis and MacBook Pros have a single DVI port; Mac Pros have at least two DVI ports.If your HDTV has a free DVI port, then all you need is a standard DVD cable; no adapter is necessary. But in all likelihood, you'll need to connect your Mac to your HDTV using either an HDMI or VGA connection; both options require an adapter. If you choose VGA, you can use the adapter that came with your Mac.If you choose HDMI, you'll need a simple adapter, which is available from multiple sources. The adapter may be a cable with a DVI connector on one end and an HDMI connector on the other, or it may be a small adapter that has both types of connectors, but no cable. Either type will work fine.iMac, MacBookiMacs and MacBooks have a mini DVI connector for hooking up external monitors or TVs. You'll need at least one adapter, maybe even two. At a minimum, you'll need a mini DVI-to-DVI adapter. You may also need a DVI-to-HDMI or DVI-to-VGA adapter, depending on which port on the HDTV you choose for the connection.Make the ConnectionOnce you determine which, if any, adapters you need, and have the necessary cable to reach from your Mac to the HDTV, turn off both the HDTV and the Mac. Connect the cable between the Mac and the HDTV.Turn the HDTV back on first. It doesn't need to be set to the connection the Mac is on, but it must be powered up first, so that when it boots, your Mac can recognize the TV and the resolution it needs. Once the HDTV is powered up, turn on the Mac.Your Mac should recognize the format and resolution of the TV, and automatically select the native resolution of the TV for running the video. In a few seconds, you should see the Mac desktop on the HDTV.Over or UnderscanYou may notice that the Mac's desktop appears to be slightly larger than the HDTV's screen (its edges are cut off); this is called overscan. Or, you may notice that the desktop doesn't occupy all of the HDTV's screen real estate (there are dark areas around the edges); this is called underscan.You can usually correct either issue by making adjustments on the HDTV. Check the HDTV's manual for information on making scan-related adjustments. They may be called overscan, underscan, dot-by-dot, or pixel-by-pixel. If your HDTV has a dot-by-dot or pixel-by-pixel capability, give this a try; it should eliminate any over or underscan issues. Some HDTVs only offer these special scan controls on specific inputs, so be sure to connect to the corresponding input on your HDTV.Time to Watch a MovieOnce you have your Mac and HDTV working together, it's time to kick back and watch a video from your Mac. Be sure to check out the QuickTime HD trailers for a sense of what HD and your Mac is capable of. Enjoy!

Feb 22, 2010 | Insignia 19 in. Widescreen Flat-Panel LCD...

1 Answer

Linksys router vs. hp computer


First of all u should ensure that DHCP server is configured for your required number of computers. this problem seems that you have less clients configured in your DHCP server, existing in router configuration.

Dec 28, 2008 | Linksys Wireless-G WRT54G Router

2 Answers

Can't get picture back on lap top after connecting to ext monitor


Hello there. You sound very frustrated. try this, go into your BIOS settings and cycle the settings for your vga adapter, or even reseting the options to basic performance. also, you could hook up the external monitor and disable it while it's hooked up. that should fix any problems with that(if you still have an extra.)

Nov 11, 2008 | Nvidia Computers & Internet

1 Answer

D link Router & my laptop


Debugging the issue -- this is not a solution.

Have you plugged a computer into the router if possible using an ethernet connection? Did it successfully access the internet?

If not the ISP (modem?) side of your router is probably configured incorrectly for your ISP

If that works wireless routers and adapters operate different bands I know of A, B, G and N. Do both your router and adapter card have at least one of those bands in common?

At any time have you attempted on the laptop to connect with the router? When connecting do you see your router by name? has your router been set to a unique name so you aren't confused seeing one of your neighbor's routers?

Did you enable encryption (WEP or WPA) in either the router or the wireless adapter and not enable it in the other?

Do you have MAC filtering on in you router and forgot to enter the wireless cards MAC accress?

Please reply with as many answers as you know and we can step through the process to attempt to complete the connection.

Also please provide the manufacturer and model for each of the following
Your router, your laptop and your network adapter

Please provide the operating system installed on your laptop,

If the wired connection to the internet does not work please provide the name of your internet service provider.

Dec 18, 2007 | Computers & Internet

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