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HOW DO I INSTALL A HONEYWELL LINE VOLTAGE THERMOSTAT T651

OLD THERMOSTAT AS TWO WIRES BOTH ARE BLACK . NEW THERMOSTAT HAS THREE WIRES ONE BLACK ONE RED AND ONE BLUE .

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: thermostat installation

how do I install a basic digital thermostat?

Posted on Feb 04, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: changing a room thermostat a potterton to honeywell t6360

I think I've done it - but don't take this as absolute truth.
For the Honeywell T6360B the original Potterton wiring should be rewired as follows:
Brown [Live] goes to terminal 1; Blue [neutral] goes to Terminal 2 and the yellow/green [which is not an earth but a switched live - i.e. gives live to the heating system when the thermostat clicks in] goes to terminal 3.
Obviously all done with the power isolated and when it was switched back on we had heating again :o)
It's been on over two hours now and all seems fine.

Posted on Feb 16, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: rewire an old 2 wire thermostat to a honeywell 5-1-1 programmable

I connected the blue wire to the R and the white wire to the W on the old thermostat and shoved the new Honeywell 5-1-1 Day programmable thermostat up the first guys *** that i ran into at Canadian Tire

Thanks for your help

Posted on Dec 29, 2008

  • 71 Answers

SOURCE: Help - I am trying to install a honeywell RLV4300A

You will have to have schematics from the old wiring diagram. Then you will have to confirm its consistency with actual old wiring before you can be sure that the wires run to the proper places on the old heater and a/c system. This sounds like a gas furnace and is simpler than a heatpump. Once you know what distinguishes the wires with the same color, you should label them and then you may call them a different color if they were wired with wrong wire colors. You may be in luck if you go to the furnace control box an look at the terminals.. They are usually labeled with a R for Red and W for white and Bl for Blue and B or Black. If you have other colors on these then it sounds that it was wired with wire spare wire by someone who knew what they were doing but neglected to leave a path for someone else follow.
You may be able to use a continuity tester of circuit tester to id these wires that are in question...
ie, once indintified, you can match with the requirements of the new stat.

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • 15 Answers

SOURCE: Replace three wire thermostat with four wire thermostat

From the two red and two black wires (and the specs in the pdf), your new thermostat sounds like it's designed to directly control the line voltage (120 or 240) to the heater. That's the usual way baseboard heaters are controlled.

Could your wires be red, black, and (old, yellowed) white, the standard colors in a 3-wire power cable? Just the red and black should be enough to control a 120-volt heater so I don't understand what the white would have been used for. If it were my heater I'd take off the cover(s) -- with the power off, of course -- and find out what those wires actually connect to.

Posted on Jan 26, 2009

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Honeywell com yourhome


Yes, it should work. Old thermo has 4 wires, follow instruction with new thermo.

Jul 22, 2014 | Honeywell Universal Digital...

Tip

Thermostat Line Voltage How to Install or Replace


You either have a new line voltage thermostat or have to replace your old line voltage thermostat. In either case the process is much the same.

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  1. Make sure that all power is turned off at the breaker panel. Most heaters that use a line voltage thermostat usually use 240v current so the breaker will either be a double pole breaker or you will need to turn off two single pole breakers to kill all of the power.
  2. Check to see which wires are hooked to the breakers. In most cases it will be the red and black wires, but I have seen many times that the white and black wires were used. Often there is no red available when the white is used.
  3. Take out the two screws that hold the thermostat to the junction box. When you get the thermostat out make a note of which wires go to the heater (load) and which wires are coming from the breakers. (line)
  4. If you have a single pole thermostat installed one of the sets of wires may be wired straight through the box or have the line and load wires connected directly in the box. With a double pole t-stat you will have both sets of wires running through the t-stat.
  5. Remove the old thermostat and wire the new t-stat in the circuit with the load wires hooked to the load or heater and the line wires hooked to the wires coming from the breaker. Make sure to get a very good tight connection as resistance loads will heat up quickly if good contact is not made. This poor connection can and will start fires.
  6. Turn the power on and check the heater for heat output.
  7. Turn the power back off and carefully screw the thermostat to the junction box securely. Then you can reapply the power to the circuit.

Now you are up and running with a new line voltage thermostat installed.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3894275-manual_honeywell_find_honeywell_manuals

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623083-thermostat_wiring_terminal_designations

on Jan 16, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I just bought a Honeywell 5.2 Day RTH2300B Programmable thermostat to replace my old mercury thermostat for my gas fireplace. When I took of old thermostat it only has two wires. A white wire and a black...


I just installed a Honeywell 5.2 Day RTH2310B Programmable thermostat and I had to deal with the same situation: 2 wires, one white one black. After reading the edvice in one of the blog, the solution that worked for me was: BLACK ON Rc terminal and WHITE on W terminal. My furnace is running fine now. Hope it helps.

Dec 06, 2010 | Honeywell Focus 6300B 5-2 Days...

2 Answers

I am installing a new thermostat for my baseboard electric heat. The electric box has 2 wires comming into it. So I have 2 black, 2 white and 2 ground. The old thermostat had a place for all 4 wires (one...


One wire is "IN" the other is "OUT" A Thermostat works by "Breaking" the "Phase" line. It is just that simple. You usually have a pair of wires that connects, on the "Hot" side, to the always power ON line, & neutral. The Circuit, or Load, on the "Cold" side, has a a pair of contacts that open & close depending on Thermostat, in series with that conductor. Hot Contacts Cold P In-------------------><-----------------P Out
N----------------------------------------------------N

Mar 04, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Three wires not marked for new Thermostat!


You will need to go to the heating system and see what color wires are hooked to that. Typically the black and white wires will be used unless they used another color due to a bad wire. Hook the colored wires to the R or RH terminal on the thermostat and the other wire to the W terminal. You can also try taking the wires you have and one by one twisting them together and have a second person inform you when the heating system turns on. Take those two wires and hook them to the terminals I mentioned above.

Jan 14, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

2 Answers

I'm replacing my old thermostat with a honeywell


usually you should have 4 or 5 wires....if you have AC then this wire should be Y if not was it connected at all before?...Heating requires only R&W

Oct 24, 2009 | Honeywell Electronic Programmable...

2 Answers

Wiring new RTH2310 DIY Honeywell


sounds like you've got bear wires touching at the new tstat

Sep 18, 2009 | Honeywell Focus 6300B 5-2 Days...

1 Answer

Updating old honeywell thermostat with a new honeywell thermostat


check in the unit heater to see what is hooked up most only need to have red from transformer white to call for heat and green to make the fan run in man and somtimes common usually blue or black

May 09, 2009 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Replace three wire thermostat with four wire thermostat


From the two red and two black wires (and the specs in the pdf), your new thermostat sounds like it's designed to directly control the line voltage (120 or 240) to the heater. That's the usual way baseboard heaters are controlled.

Could your wires be red, black, and (old, yellowed) white, the standard colors in a 3-wire power cable? Just the red and black should be enough to control a 120-volt heater so I don't understand what the white would have been used for. If it were my heater I'd take off the cover(s) -- with the power off, of course -- and find out what those wires actually connect to.

Jan 26, 2009 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

2 Answers

Thermostat installation


On paul 306, I don't have any info on you're system, but the old thermostat that has the smaller wires with the colors you described is a low voltage (24volt) controls. The new one you purchased sounds like it is for a system that is made for line voltage (120 volts or more) connecting this to the unit may have bad results. This also may apply to GUEST.
COACOOCHEE, the white and black coming into the box is the line, even though white should not be used for line, the connections for the other side of the thermostat is the load. The new thermostat you have be a single pole break as opposed to the old one may be a double pole. You should have a meter to check the voltage coming into the box, it may be 120 or 220 depending on what you have. Without any more info I cant be sure, but you may be able to connect the black wires to the switch and the white together. But it would be wise to test with a meter to be sure before doing this.

Nov 16, 2007 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

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