Question about Cameras

Open Question

Yashica high definition optical lense - Cameras

Posted by Anonymous on

Ad

3 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
cammedic
  • 667 Answers

SOURCE: Yashica Kyocera

There are a couple of those on eBay, several days to go on the auctions

Posted on Feb 21, 2008

Ad
  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: Which is the difference between

I would think that the difference is in the "Macro".

Meaning the Yashica lens AF 35-70mm 1:3.3-4.5 Macro would be able to take close-up photos of smaller things like insects.

I hope that helps.

Posted on May 02, 2011

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My barlow lense is making it hard to focus


Only answer is depends on your optics. Maximum practical magnification is 50x per inch of aperture on very good conditions.
If you have a store brand telescope, the optics are poor (both the scope and the optics) it can't handle the magnification.
High magnification requires a good , clear night.
Allow your scope to reach thermal equilibrium before viewing.

Feb 22, 2013 | Optics

2 Answers

Yashica Lens 28 - 80 mm can i fix any digital camara


With the proper adapter, Contax-mount lenses may be used on several different makers' digital cameras, including Canon and Sony.

Oct 01, 2012 | Kyocera Yashica Lens Mc Zoom 28-80mm...

1 Answer

I have an slr camera.. a yashica 300Af and i was wondering if i can replace my lens with another brand>> Is there a compatible camera lens for it? It so hard to look for a yashica lens here in the...


The Contax/Yashica lens mount was never popular to start with anywhere in the world, and the AF version of that mount was even rarer.

Your camera can only use lenses which are scarce, expensive and hard to find. Just use the camera as it is, and get another camera body with more widely available lenses such as Nikon, Canon, Pentax or Olympus. You can often pick those up for free or very cheaply.

Jun 17, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Which is the difference between these two lenses: Yashica lens AF 35-70mm 1:3.3-4.5 Macro c Yashica lens AF 35-70mm 1:3.3-4.5 Do they work of different form?


I would think that the difference is in the "Macro".

Meaning the Yashica lens AF 35-70mm 1:3.3-4.5 Macro would be able to take close-up photos of smaller things like insects.

I hope that helps.

Apr 29, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

I want to know the service center address and contact number of yashica in manila, quezon city or makati- philippines.thanks


For all inquiries regarding Yashica film cameras, the closest center to any of those locations is:

line_dot_600.gif KYOCERA Hong Kong Logistics Co., Ltd. 6th Floor of Niche Centre, No.14 **** Tai Road, Kowloon Bay, Kowloon Hong Kong, China TEL: 852-2343-5151
FAX: 852-2343-2472

From their website:
"If you are located in Asia, the Middle-East, or Oceania and have an inquiry related to YASHICA film cameras, please contact KYOCERA Hong Kong Logistics Co., Ltd. in Hong Kong."

please see:
http://global.kyocera.com/prdct/optical/global/#s02

Mar 30, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

What are the differences between lenses? I know some are made of plastic and some from glass..Thanks!


There are couple of materials in which sunglassess are made of. 1. Glass Lenses
- it's has number of advantages: -Exceptional scratch resistance (don't need scratch resistant coating).
-Excellent optical clarity.
-Anti-reflective (AR) coating adheres to glass very well.Disadvantages are:-At least twice the weight of plastic or polycarbonate lenses.
-About 25 to 40 percent thicker than polycarbonate and high index plastic lenses.
-Can shatter or chip easier than lenses made of other materials.
-Require a special coating to provide 100% UV protection Second type is Plastic Lenses:Advantages:

Lightweight - About half the weight of glass lenses.
Plastic lenses accept tints easily.
More shatter - resistant than glass lenses.


Disadvantages:

About 20 to 35 percent thicker than polycarbonate or high index plastic lenses.
Require scratch-resistant coating for added durability.
Require a special coating to provide 100% UV protection.
Another type is Polycarbonate Lenses:Advantages:
Safest lens material - 10 times more impact resistant than other lenses.
Thin - About 20 to 25 percent thinner than plastic or glass lenses.
Lightweight - About 20 percent lighter than plastic lenses.
Blocks 100 percent UV rays without needing a special coating.
Disadvantages:
Requires scratch-resistant coating for durability.
Peripheral vision may be slightly less clear in strong prescription powers.
More lens reflections than glass or plastic lenses (AR coating recommended). High Index Plastic Lenses-Advantages:

Lightweight - Between plastic and polycarbonate lenses in weight.
Thin - About 15 to 30 percent thinner than plastic lenses.
Better peripheral optics than polycarbonate lenses (for prescription sunglasses).
Disadvantages:
Requires scratch-resistant coating for durability.
More lens reflections than glass or plastic lenses (AR coating recommended)

Nov 07, 2010 | Clothing Accessories

1 Answer

What other cameras accept Ricoh lenses? We have a great 600mm f8 lens for our 35mm SLR and would like to find a digital camera that will accept this and other Ricoh lenses. Thanks in advance for any...


Ricoh used the Pentax K-mount.

Pentax are one of only two manufacturers whose current SLR's will accept the older lenses but there will be significant compromises:-

Not all K mounts will work; there's no definitive list so it's "**** it and see".

Most KA mounts should work (KA are the autofocus versions).

All lenses designed for 35mm film SLR's will behave as if they have an approximately 1.5x teleconverter fitted: a 50mm standard lens becomes a 75mm portrait lens, a 28mm wide angle becomes a 42mm and almost indistinguishable from the 50mm standard lens. A typical 80-200mm zoom becomes a 120-300mm zoom and your 600mm becomes a rather less useful 900mm although the effective aperture remains the same.

There will be little if any communication between the lens and the body: K mounts use a mechanical coupling to transmit aperture settings to the body, and the body stops the lens down during exposure with another mechanical coupling. This will no longer work. Some KA lenses will exchange information and automatically stop down. If your current 600mm is a catadioptric (mirror) lens then this is not an issue as it will only have a fixed f8 aperture.

Your current lenses will be to a far inferior optical specification compared to modern lenses. Genuine Ricoh/Rikenon lenses were generally no match for regular Pentax models of the time, and they in turn are generally nowhere near as good as modern lenses. This is because the old models not only use inferior materials technology, but also because modern optics are computer designed and modelled and are optimised for the particular requirements of a digital imager. However, you will generally find that the actual build quality of your old lenses will be superior to modern offerings and they'll be more robust. Also, unless you regularly make large prints or selective enlargements AND regularly use a tripod you may not see the difference in optical quality in real life amateur use. You definitely won't see the difference if you only ever display the photos on a monitor.

Personally, I cannot recommend Pentax dSLR's over any other brand on the basis of legacy use alone, and if the 600mm is the one good lens then I'd seriously consider selling it as there is a demand for good 35mm lenses. I'd give the same advice whichever brand of 35mm you previously used, unless you had a lot of high-end Canon AF/Nikon lenses and were going to buy an expensive full-frame digital SLR. Look at all of the competing offerings and choose what currently suits your photographic needs.

Hope this has helped to clarify things for you, all I ask in return is that you take a brief moment to rate my answer.

Feb 01, 2010 | Ricoh XR-7M II 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a number of Contax lenses I inherited from my father and I was wondering what digital camera bodies they would fit.


Without adapters, none. Contax shared their CY lens mount with Yashica and both produced fine cameras and lenses but neither manufacturer survived the transition from film to digital so there are no digital cameras which can use them as standard.

With the correct adapter you can mount most of them to Olympus Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds for certain but some CY lenses may have rear elements which project backwards too far into the camera body. You'll also find that there will be no automatic stop down and no communication of aperture, zoom or focus settings to whichever digital body you fit them to.

Many CY lenses are excellent Carl Zeiss T* units but like almost all old 35mm lenses the optical designs were designed by engineers using slide rules and calculators. Except for the occasional "accidentally good" lens you shouldn't expect the optical performance to match contemporary designs which have the benefit of computer aided design and the latest advances in optical technology. This is especially true at apertures wider than around f8.

You may find adapters from CY to anything else to be hard to obtain/expensive simply due to lack of demand: even at their peak, Contax and Yashica SLR cameras were infrequently encountered and had very low sales volumes.

Although this may all sound negative, my advice is to check ebay for an adapter; many good Chinese sellers offer excellent and cheap adapters but research their feedback. Your lenses should be much better than the average 35mm SLR lenses and if you can accept a few compromises are still capable of producing very good photographs under the right conditions. Alternatively find a good used body like a Contax 139 or Yashica FX-D and scan the 35mm negatives afterwards for best results.

Sep 02, 2009 | Contax Cameras

1 Answer

Yashica Kyocera


There are a couple of those on eBay, several days to go on the auctions

Feb 20, 2008 | Kyocera 24mm f/2.8 Lens

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

244 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76673 Answers

Are you a Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...