Question about Dryers

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Gas dryer will not heat

I have tested the thermal fuse, the igniter, the High Temperature sensor, the thermistor and the coils. There is continuity in all the previous components or the correct resistance across terminals 1,2,&3 at the two gas valve coils. I get no voltage reading at the igniter connector while the dryer is set to high temperature and working. What else can I test?

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  • Dryers Master
  • 14,553 Answers

I am not an expert in this area but have fixed a few problems like yours---If the Igniter is ceramic and white look to see it is not cracked or broken near the middle.

Note my area of expertise, just trying to help.

Posted on Dec 04, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

aasc
  • 1606 Answers

SOURCE: Whirlpool duet electric wil not heat

Remove 1 wire from the element . Your 220 V comes from ...110 motor , 110 control board . Check which wire is not getting 110 V , trace it and see which it comes from . That will tell you which one is defective .

Posted on Aug 01, 2009

KevinWhite
  • 1902 Answers

SOURCE: Whirlpool gas dryer model WGD9200SQ0,

Hello & Welcome to FixYa

The problem is with the door switch or the flame sensor that is bad and needs replacement, you can test both these parts and let me know the result. Please get back to me if you have any other questions.

Kevin

Posted on Jul 19, 2011

oldTech2332
  • 2341 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore elite gas dryer won't

Hello Chuck,
In addation to what you have checked here is a list of what else to check

Flame switch...black box on burner tube...check for continuty

Ignitor...check for 120 vac too it

Timer/control board heat relay..on models w/timer check for contunity in heat circuit on timer. ON models w/control check that heat relay on board is closing and has continuty

Motor switch..check that heat circuit is closed and has continuty when motor is running and motor switch has closed for heat circuit(the start winding switch on motor will be open when running)

WARNING..WHEN PLUGGED IN FLAME SWITCH WILL BE LIVE ALL THE TIME AND SHOCK YOU WHEN TOUCHING..BE SURE TO DISCONNECT POWER BEFORE CHECKING

Gene

Posted on Aug 09, 2011

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1 Answer

Non Glowing Igniter


What solenoids are you referring to?

When you set the timer and heat selector switches on your dryer and press the button [switch] to turn it on, the direction of 120VAC passes through the heat selector switch through the timer switch through the cycling thermostat through the hi-limit switch, through the thermal cut-off fuse to the burner assembly's gas valve.

Simultaneously, as the current is traveling through a path to the 1st gas valve coil, current is also traveling through a path to the flame sensor- and then to the igniter.

The igniter will begin to glow and when it gets hot enough, the flame sensor will detect the heat and switch off. which then diverts current to the second gas valve coils.

The second gas valve coils activate plungers in the gas valve which allows gas to flow out into the burner housing. The igniter still being hot, ignites the gas to a long blue flame.

To maintain the proper air temperature, the heat in the blower housing is monitored by the cycling thermostat. During normal operation, air temperature should be between 120 degrees Fahrenheit and 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

When the air reaches the proper temperature specific to your dryer model, the cycling thermostat will switch off the voltage to the burner assembly.

The hi-limit thermostat and thermal cut-off fuse monitor the drum air temperature. If there is an air flow problem [restriction or total blockage], the hi-limit thermostat may switch off the voltage to prevent damage to the dryer.

Eventually, if the air flow problem [restriction or total blockage] is not corrected, the thermal cut-off fuse will fail (blow) and the dryer won't heat at all.

Check continuity to the following components, thermal cut-off fuse, hi-limit thermostat, igniter, flame sensor, and cycling thermostat. Of course you will take your readings with the power cord of the dryer unplugged from the wall outlet.

You will either disconnect [isolate] any of the wire leads going to their respective components during the test [using a multimeter (analog or digital)]; OR remove each of the components entirely from the dryer to test them.

1.) A good thermal cut-off fuse will have 0 Ohms of resistance. On the other hand, if the needle [on a an analog tester] does not move OR the digital display [on a digital meter] has not changed significantly, there is NO continuity - which means the fuse has burned out and needs to be replaced

2.) A dryer's Hi-Limit Thermostat is activated by hi-temperature changes (between 250 degrees Fahrenheit and 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

A good hi-limit thermostat will have 0 Ohms of resistance at room temperature.

To test the thermostat's response to temperature change, place the component on an electric griddle or skillet. Set the heat on the skillet or griddle to the appropriate temperature according to the temperature rating stamped on the hi-limit thermostat you are testing. If the hi-limit thermostat switches off within 5% of that temperature, the part is functioning properly. However, if the hi-limit thermostat does not switch off OR switches off prematurely, the hi-limit thermostat is faulty and will have to be replaced. [Remember, when the switch turns off at the appropriate temperature level- you should get a high resistance reading to show that the circuit is "open")

3.) Perform the same procedure as step 2 to test the Cycling Thermostat: First at room temperature and then its response to temperature change. The only difference is, the test temperature range will be somewhere between 120-160 degrees Fahrenheit Once again, refer to the temperature rating stamped on the component you are testing- and the 5% tolerance remains the same, too.

4.) The resistance reading for the igniter is between 50 and 400 Ohms of resistance; anything else, it's faulty- toss it and replace it.

5.) You should get a resistance reading of 0 Ohms at the flame sensor-

Flame sensors are tricky though. Flame sensors could still short out and
allow the igniter to glow- but would prevent voltage from reaching the gas coil. For example, the igniter will glow and not turn off and a flame will not be established because there was no voltage at the gas coil to open up and release gas for ignition.

Hope this info helps...I would appreciate a follow-up from you when you resolve this problem- to gain more knowledge and skill.

Thank-you and best wishes on your project

Jul 15, 2013 | Whirlpool LGR3624JQ Gas Dryer

Tip

Whirlpool Dryer Various Test Procedures - Part 2


TEST #4 Heater
This test is performed when either of the following situations occur: Dryer does not heat Heat will not shut off
This test checks the components making up the heating circuit. The following items are part of this system:
Harness/connection, Heater relay, Thermal cut-off, Thermal fuse, High limit thermostat, Gas burner assembly,
Centrifugal switch, Exhaust thermistor, Machine control electronics, Gas supply. Dryer does not heat:
1. Unplug dryer or disconnect power.
2. Remove the back panel to access the thermal components.
3. Perform TEST #4b. If the thermal fuse is OK, go to step 4.
4. Perform TEST #4c. If the thermal cut-off is OK, go to step 5.
5. Locate the high limit thermostat. Measure the continuity through it by connecting the meter probes on the
red wire and blue wire terminals. If there is an open circuit, replace the high limit thermostat and thermal cutoff.
Otherwise, go to step 6.
6. Perform TEST #4d. If this is OK, replace the machine control electronics.
Heat will not shut off:
1. Unplug dryer or disconnect power.
2. Access the machine control electronics, remove the P14 connector, then measure the resistance between P14-3 (red-white wire) and P14-6 (red-white wire) at the connector. If 5–15 k ohms are measured, replace the machine control electronics. If the resistance is greater than 20 k ohms, replace the exhaust thermistor.
TEST #4a Exhaust Thermistor
The machine control electronics monitors the exhaust temperature using the exhaust thermistor, and cycles the heater relay on and off to maintain the desired temperature. Begin with an empty dryer and a clean lint screen.
1. Plug in dryer or reconnect power.
2. Start the Timed Dry cycle.
3. If after 60 seconds, F-22 or F-23 flashes in the display and the dryer shuts off, the thermistor or wire harness is either open or shorted. Unplug dryer or disconnect power. Check wire connections at the machine control electronics and thermistor. If wire connections are OK, check exhaust thermistor resistance per step 5.
4. If F-22 or F-23 does not flash in the display, the connections to the thermistor are good. Therefore, check the exhaust temperature value at any or all of the temperature levels in question, using the Timed Dry cycle, and the following process: Hold a glass bulb thermometer capable of reading from 90° to 180°F (32° to 82°C)
in the center of the exhaust outlet. The correct exhaust temperatures are as follows:
TEMP
SETTING HEAT TURNS
OFF* HEAT TURNS
ON High 155° ± 5°F
(68°± 3°C) 10–15°F
(6–8°C)
below the
heat turn off
temperature Medium 140° ± 5°F
(60°± 3°C) 10–15°F
(6–8°C)
below the
heat turn off
temperature Low 125° ± 5°F
(52°± 3°C) 10–15°F
(6–8°C)
below the
heat turn off
temperature Extra Low 105° ± 5°F
(41°± 3°C) 10–15°F
(6–8°C)
below the
heat turn off
temperature The measured overshoot using the glass
bulb thermometer in the exhaust outlet can
be 30°F (17°C) higher.
5. If the exhaust temperature is not within specified limits, or you have come here from step 3, remove the P14 connector, then measure the resistance between P14-3 (red-white wire) and P14-6 (redwhite wire) at the connector. If the resistance is OK, check P14-3 and P14-6 to machine ground. If resistance is greater than 0 (zero), replace wiring harness. NOTE: All thermistor resistance measurements must be made while dryer is
disconnected from power. The following table gives temperatures and ranges for the associated thermistor resistance values.
Temp
F C
Res
kΩ
Temp
F C
Res
kΩ
50° (10°) 19.0 -22.0 80° (27°) 8.5-10.5 60° (16°) 14.8-16.8 90° (32°) 6.8-8.8 70° (21°) 11.5-13.5 100° (38°) 5.0-7.0 If the thermistor resistance does not agree with table, replace the exhaust thermistor. If the thermistor resistance checks agree with the measurements in the table, replace the machine control electronics.
TEST #4b Thermal Fuse
The thermal fuse is wired in series with the dryer drive motor.
1. Unplug dryer or disconnect power.
2. Access the thermal fuse by first removing the back panel.
3. Using an ohmmeter, check the continuity across the thermal fuse. If the ohmmeter indicates an open circuit,
replace the failed thermal fuse.
TEST #4c Thermal Cut-Off
If the dryer does not produce heat, check the status of the thermal cut-off.
1. Unplug dryer or disconnect power.
2. Access the thermal cut-off by first removing the back panel. .
3. Using an ohmmeter, check the continuity across the thermal cut-off. If the ohmmeter indicates an open circuit,
replace the failed thermal cut-off and high limit thermostat. In addition, check for blocked or improper exhaust
system.

TEST #4d Gas Valve
1. Unplug dryer or disconnect power.
2. Access the gas valve by removing the front panel and drum assembly.
3. Use an ohmmeter to determine if a gas valve coil has failed. Remove harness plugs. Measure resistance across terminals.

on Apr 11, 2009 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

No heat from tumble dryer


Hi.

If dryer is electric check for lint obstructions, check ventilation, test thermal fuse, thermistor, cycling thermostat and high limit, element and fan.

If dryer is gas check for lint obstructions, check ventilation, test thermal fuse, thermistor, cycling thermostat and high limit, igniter, coils, burner, flame sensor and fan.

Dec 14, 2011 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

Dryer air is not getting hot. All other functions still work.


There are several things that can prevent a dryer from not heating.. Unplug Power Before checking.
Electric Models
1- Power- Your dryer runs on 220volts. 110 runs the entire dryer and 110 runs just the element. Your breaker may have half tripped. Check to see if you are getting the correct amount of power by using a ohm meter. Also check the power cord for burn marks on the plugin and the cord itself.
2- The thermal fuse can prevent this from heating. The thermal fuse is a sensor on the blower housing the measures the temperature of the air. There is a cycling thermistat near the thermal fuse. If the dryer temp gets over 190-220 degrees the thermal fuse will blow to cut power to the element to prevent fire. You can test this by using a continuity tester.
3- High limit and/or thermal cutoff. These are both sensors on the heating element housing. Thermal cutoff is at the top and the high limit is near the bottom above the heating element connectors. Test these with a continuity tester.
4- Heating element- Just below the high limit on the heater housing. Test for continuity.
5- Motor- The motor has to reach a certain rpm to activate a sinfrigrial switch inside the motor. If the rpm is not reached it will not allow current to go to the element.
6- Timer- Make sure you are trying this on timed dry. Sometimes people use air fluff and forget to change it back. The timer could also not be sending current to the heater.

Gas models
1- Electric ignitor- Inside the flame tunnel inside of dryer near where gas line hooks up. Usually if it glows than it is still good but check to see if it is sending and amp signal to the heat coils.
2- Heater coils are two valves that open up when the ignitor send signal saying the ignitor can ignite the gas. Heat coils will not open to send gas if it does not receive a signal from the ignotor. They look like two round disk with two wires running from ignitor.
3- Flame sensor- Change if you change the heater coils. The flame sensor could not be detecting the flame inside so it shuts down the ignitor.
4- Motor- See above
5- Timer See above

If you have any further questions or need further assistance please feel free to comment me back

Jul 28, 2011 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

2 Answers

Dryer is running, but heat will not turn on


There are several things that can prevent a dryer from not heating.. Unplug Power Before checking.
Electric Models
1- Power- Your dryer runs on 220volts. 110 runs the entire dryer and 110 runs just the element. Your breaker may have half tripped. Check to see if you are getting the correct amount of power by using a ohm meter. Also check the power cord for burn marks on the plugin and the cord itself.
2- The thermal fuse can prevent this from heating. The thermal fuse is a sensor on the blower housing the measures the temperature of the air. There is a cycling thermistat near the thermal fuse. If the dryer temp gets over 190-220 degrees the thermal fuse will blow to cut power to the element to prevent fire. You can test this by using a continuity tester.
3- High limit and/or thermal cutoff. These are both sensors on the heating element housing. Thermal cutoff is at the top and the high limit is near the bottom above the heating element connectors. Test these with a continuity tester.
4- Heating element- Just below the high limit on the heater housing. Test for continuity.
5- Motor- The motor has to reach a certain rpm to activate a sinfrigrial switch inside the motor. If the rpm is not reached it will not allow current to go to the element.
6- Timer- Make sure you are trying this on timed dry. Sometimes people use air fluff and forget to change it back. The timer could also not be sending current to the heater.

Gas models
1- Electric ignitor- Inside the flame tunnel inside of dryer near where gas line hooks up. Usually if it glows than it is still good but check to see if it is sending and amp signal to the heat coils.
2- Heater coils are two valves that open up when the ignitor send signal saying the ignitor can ignite the gas. Heat coils will not open to send gas if it does not receive a signal from the ignotor. They look like two round disk with two wires running from ignitor.
3- Flame sensor- Change if you change the heater coils. The flame sensor could not be detecting the flame inside so it shuts down the ignitor.
4- Motor- See above
5- Timer See above

If you have any further questions or need further assistance please feel free to comment me back.

Jul 27, 2011 | Kenmore Dryers

2 Answers

Dryer will not heat


Check the reset inside the dryer. You will need to open the machine. The part looks like this one. If this is ok, then check the heater element for continuity with a multimeter. If you need the heater element, here is a link to the part.

Dec 26, 2010 | Fisher and Paykel SMARTLOAD DE62T27G Gas...

1 Answer

Workes fine no heat


the temperature thermostats and or heater are bad, on electricdryers, you can ohm out to see what is defective.

There's no heat dot_lineone.gif 1. Gas valve coils
Igniter glows, then shuts off without igniting gas - the problem is probably with defective coils (black, located on top of the gas valve). It is recommended to replace all coils (usually two or three) if found defective.

Note: Sometimes the whole gas valve may be defective, thus not letting the gas out. However, this problem is not common.

2. Thermal fuse
Most dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.

Note: It is recommended by most dryer manufacturers to replace a hi-limit thermostat when replacing a thermal fuse.

3. Igniter
Igniter may burn out or break. Replace the igniter if found defective.

Note: Igniters are very fragile and break easily. It is recommended to handle the igniter only touching the ceramic part of it (usually white in color).

4. Flame sensor (or radiant heat sensor)
Replace the sensor (located near the igniter) if found defective.

electric dryer

1 Heating element
A burned out heating element will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Replace the element if found defective.

2 Thermal fuse
Most dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.

Oct 27, 2009 | Candy CDC266 Dryer

1 Answer

Kenmore Gas Dryer won't heat!


On the back of the dryer near the fan blower housing is a thermal fuse, if this opens up ( no continuity ) the gas burner often quits but the motor will still run. If the thermal fuse is open/bad, always clean, change, adjust the venting system and vent hood first and clean out the dryers air ducts. Sometimes it is a good idea to replace the operating thermostat at the same time.
Thermal fuse parts help link...on blower housing cover, can not be re-set, must be replaced if is open (no continuity between pins).

Jul 11, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

No Heat


Hello
Welcome to Fixya


Remove the vent line from the rear and try the dryer.
If it heats then that means there is a clog or kink in the vent line blocking the vent air from exiting which will stop the dryer from getting hot!
If not then it's another one of these problems.

Defective Ignitor (Gas Only)
When heated the ignitor used on your gas dryer must obtain a specific high temperature
in order to activate the flame sensor. This ignitor is fragile and susceptible to cracking.
A hairline fracture that is barely visible to the naked eye is enough to change
the resistance of the ignitor to a point that is will not work properly.
You can test the resistance of your ignitor. You should get a reading of 50-400 ohms of
resistance.

If the ignitor gets hot and then goes off after about 10-15 seconds and there is
no ignition, the problem is probably not the ignitor. It is most likely the gas valve
coils that are defective.

If the ignitor comes on and stays on, it is the flame sensor that is defective.

If the ignitor is not getting hot it could also be one of the thermostats that is defective.
The power for the ignitor is passed from the timer, through all of the thermostats,
limit switches and fuses to the ignitor. So if you are not getting power to the ignitor
during ignition, you should check the continuity of the individual thermostats and fuses.
DRYER DOES NOT HEAT



Defective Gas Valve Coil (Gas Dryer Only)

If the gas dryer will light once but will not relight until it cools down, it is likely the gas valve coils are faulty. These coils loose some strength when subjected to heat. When they become old, the addition of heat may be enough to prevent them from opening the gas valve when hot. However the coils still work when when cool.

An easy way to diagnose the coils when the burner is not lighting, watch the ignitor. If the the ignitor glows for 10 to 15 seconds but no flame is created, then the coils are faulty. If the ignitor is not glowing the problem is elsewhere.

Recent Customer Symptoms:
The dryer burner doesn't always come on when starting. If the burner does come on, once it goes off if won't come on again until the dryer cools down.



Defective Flame Sensor (Gas Dryer Only)
The flame sensor's job is to monitor the ignitor for sufficient heat
to ignite the gas. A properly operating flame sensor will pass a
continuity check under room temperature.

Common Symptoms
If the flame sensor is defective in the open position,
the ignitor will not get hot when the dryer is started.
However, if it is defective in the closed position the ignitor
will get hot, but the flame sensor will not allow the flame to ignite.
In this case, the ignitor will usually stay hot for a long period of
time.



Defective Thermostat
The thermostats are responsible for maintaining the proper temperature
in the dryer. Check the exhaust temperature of the dyer and if the
temperature is above 150 degrees, you will most likely need to change
the operating thermostat.

The thermostat can also fail in the opposite mode.
It can prevent the element from heating at all.
A failed continuity check at room temperature will verify this condition.

There are some special thermostats that are single pole double throw.
These thermostats are often used to control the timer when set to the
Automatic Dry cycle. If the dryer timer will advance in the Timed Dry
cycle but not the Automatic Dry cycle, then the thermostat could be the
problem.


Defective Thermal Fuse
The thermal fuse is in series with one leg of power to the motor.
If the fuse is open (no continuity) the motor will not run.

Location:
The thermal fuse is located in different locations according
to the model and brand of dryer.

Solution:
Check the thermal fuse for continuity with a volt/ohm meter.
If it is open, it will need to be replaced






Thank You For trusting us with your question
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Jan 25, 2009 | Kenmore 73952 Gas Dryer

1 Answer

Want heat up


The first thing we must determine is the type of dryer we are servicing. There are only two types; Gas or electric. If your dryer is electric, meaning it uses electricity instead of flame to produce heat, step one is to verify that the breaker to the dryer's electrical circuit is fully on. Since electric dryers require 240 volts to run, their circuit is run through a dual breaker switch. Sometimes only one half of the breaker switch will be off or fail which will supply enough power to make your dryer tumble but not enough for it to produce heat. Pop the breaker to your dryer off and on again and then see if the dryer will now produce heat. If it does, then have the breaker replaced. If it doesn't, you can verify that the dryer outlet is fully powered by testing it with a volt meter, You can learn how to use a volt meter here. If the outlet is fully powered then the problem definitely rests within the dryer.
Let's next deal with the failure common to both types.
You will need a continuity tester for this process.
After you have removed the power from your dryer and shut off the gas, you will also need to access the internal workings of your dryer. Directions for achieving access, specific to your brand, can be found here.
Most dryers have a thermal fuse located in the exhaust path. Depending on your dryer, the fuse will be found toward the front or the rear of your unit. Generally, if there is a removable back on your dryer then that is where you will find the fuse.
The two most commons thermal fuses you might find are shown in Figure 1. They are each roughly 1" in size. You will notice that the contact points are easily spotted for a continuity test.
In older units and some electrically heated units you will find a series of thermal fuses, looking like small tin cans, at various points along the heater assembly. These will also need to be tested before you can rule out thermal fuses as your problem. If any of the thermal fuses fails the continuity test, then it needs to be replaced. You can find reputable parts dealers at the top of this page.


Electric Dryers After proving your thermal fuse(s) is/are good in your electric dryer it is time to move on to the next most likely possibility, the heating element. A typical heating element is shown in Figure 2. The element, as are all dryer electric heating elements, is comprised of metal coils supported on a framework with two contact points where wires are connected to the rest of the dryer. A break in this coil will stop the dryer from being able to create heat. Test the two contacts for continuity. If they fail, then you need a new heating element. You can find a diagram showing where each brand tends to place its heating elements here.
If both the thermal fuse and the element show continuity it is time to call a professional to service your electric dryer.
window.google_render_ad(); Gas Dryers Gas dryers use a burner system to create heat. This system has a number of parts that are known to fail over time. Some you can test, some you must simply rely on symptomology to form your decision to replace or not to replace.
In Figure 3 you can see an entire burner assembly with the various parts labeled. Not all of these parts can be tested with a simple continuity tester. An ohm meter is now required to find your problem part. Directions on how to use an Ohm meter can be found here.
The parts prone to failure in your burner assembly are:
  • Igniter
  • Coils
  • Flame sensor
A burner operates in a fairly simple way. Once the motor is turning, centrifugal force closes the Motor Switch allowing the electricity to reach the Flame Sensor. The Flame Sensor allows the electricity to reach the Igniter, allowing it to heat up to a temperature high enough to ignite natural gas. Once the Igniter is hot enough the Flame Sensor breaks the Igniter circuit which allows the electricity to run through the Coils that open the gas valve. Gas then flows out past the Igniter and catches fire and the heat is drawn into the airflow within the dryer.

Jan 12, 2009 | Kenmore 659 Electric Dryer

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