Question about Refrigerators

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I have a Samsung refrigerator, RS261MDBP. It cools, but doesn't get child enough. The evaporator coils are almost bare (very, very small amount of frost). Temperature controls for freezer and fridge are at the max. Compressor gets warm. What do I check next?

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  • Refrigerators Master
  • 9,472 Answers

Start by checking the thermistor. It is located in the freezer by the coils. At room temperature(75 dgrs F.), your thermistor should read 5.1k ohms. Here is the part to order in case it is bad.

Posted on Dec 04, 2012

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: I have a Kenmore 106.5666502

your on the right track with the frost issue. but make sure your fan is running at the evaporator durning normal compressor run time. if there is not alot of frost build up at the evaporator the only other thing it could be is low on freon

Posted on Jun 24, 2009

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: Whirlpool SXS.....1. compressor cooling fan quit so fridge and freezer stopped working. 2. replaced cooling fan and fridge and freezer working again. 3. Now the fridge and freezer works but runs nonst

My problem is came home to a burning plastic smell. Pulled the plug and cleaned in and out of the refrigerator. Plugged it back on and turn the temp switch up and bingo the smell came back and the plug on the motor with the relay began to smoke. I quickly unplugged the fridge. Since reading I thought maybe the relay is bad, but it does not shake or rattle like indicated. Seems like the relay not burnt but smells bad. Even the motor smells bad. Need help.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012

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I have no cold air in my refrigerator or Freezer. It defrosted everything.


Condenser Coils are Dirty
If the refrigerator is not cold enough the condenser coils may be dirty. The condenser is like a radiator and must stay clean in order to dissipate the heat which was removed from the inside of the refrigerator. As the coils get dirtier the refrigerator becomes less efficient, which makes it work harder to cool down. If the coils are dirty enough, the unit will never be cold enough and will not be able to cool the inside of the refrigerator to the proper temperature.
Evaporator Fan Motor
If the refrigerator is not cold enough, the evaporator fan motor might have failed. Every refrigerator has a set of coils called an evaporator. The refrigerator may have one or more evaporator fan motor(s) depending on the model and evaporator locations. The evaporator fan motor circulates the cold air from the coils thru the compartment. If there is only one evaporator it is in the freezer side. If the fan is not working, no cold air will get to the refrigerator compartment. The freezer may still get cold.
Condenser Fan Motor
If the refrigerator is not cold enough there might be something caught in the condenser fan motor blade, or the condenser fan motor might be defective. The condenser fan motor draws air over the condenser coils to cool them. The condenser fan motor is located underneath the refrigerator near the back. Pull the refrigerator out from the wall and remove the access panel to access it.
Start Relay
If the refrigerator is not cold enough, the start relay may be defective. The start relay is a small device mounted to the side of the compressor. It provides power to the run winding along with the start winding for a split second at start-up to help get the compressor started. If the start relay is defective the compressor may run intermittently or not at all and the refrigerator will not get cold enough. The start relay should be replaced if defective.
Temperature Control Thermostat
If the refrigerator does not get cold enough the temperature control thermostat might be defective. The thermostat allows power to flow through to the compressor, evaporator fan and condenser fan. If the cooling system fans and compressor are running, but the refrigerator or freezer is not cooling correctly check for an airflow or defrost system problem.
Start Capacitor
If the refrigerator isn't cold enough the compressor might be having difficulty starting. The start capacitor serves as a battery to give the compressor a little boost during start-up. If the start capacitor is burned out the compressor might not be able to start and run as often as it should. Test the start capacitor first with a capacitance meter, they don't fail often. If it's defective, replace it.
Thermistor
If the refrigerator is not cold enough the thermistor might be defective. The thermistor is a sensor which monitors the air temperature. It is connected to the control board. If the thermistor is defective the refrigerator does not cool or may cool continuously.
Temperature Control Board
If the refrigerator is not cold enough the temperature control board might be defective. The temperature control board provides the voltage to the fan motors and compressor. These boards are often misdiagnosed. Check all other components to be certain this is the cause of the problem.
Compressor
If the refrigerator is not cold enough, the compressor might be defective. The compressor is a motor which compresses the refrigerant and circulates the refrigerant through the evaporator and condenser coils. There are several other components which are more likely to be defective if the compressor doesn't work. If the compressor itself is defective a licensed professional will need to replace it.
Main Control Board
If the refrigerator is not cold enough the main control board might be defective. This is not common. Check the defrost system, cooling fans, and cooling controls first.

Jun 28, 2017 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

FREEZER COOLING OK BUT FRIDGE LOW COOLING


Remember that most all refrigerators only have cooling to the freezer... the refrigerator depends on stealing some of that cold to be cool, so here's my top 3 guesses...
Cause 1 The defrost heater is defective, so frost accumulates on the evaporator coils, and the coils will become plugged with frost causing the airflow through the coils to be restricted, and the refrigerator not to cool. Check the evaporator coils to determine if they are frosted over. If the evaporator coils are frosted over, test each component of the defrost system after clearing any restrictions to the cooling fan and defrosting with a hair dryer.
Cause 2
The evaporator fan motor draws cold air over the evaporator coils and circulates it throughout the freezer. If the evaporator fan is not working, the freezer or refrigerator will not cool adequately. To determine if the evaporator fan motor is defective, try turning the fan blade by hand. If the fan blade does not turn freely, bench test it for function and use a multimeter to test the motor windings for continuity. If the windings do not have continuity, (very odd) replace the evaporator fan motor.
Cause 3
Damper Control Assembly The air damper control opens and closes to let the proper amount of cold air into the refrigerator compartment. If the damper does not open properly, it won't let enough cold air into the refrigerator. Check the damper control to determine if it is broken or stuck closed or that an inadvertent bump has shut it off to the refrigerator compartment

Apr 09, 2016 | White-Westinghouse WRSZ28V8GM Side-by-Side...

1 Answer

I have a daewoofrg1820brb I've had it plugged in 4 2 hrs now freezer is cold but the bottom isn't getting cold


Remember that most all refrigerators only have cooling to the freezer... the refrigerator depends on stealing some of that cold to be cool, so here's my top 3 guesses...
Cause 1 The defrost heater is defective, so frost accumulates on the evaporator coils, and the coils will become plugged with frost causing the airflow through the coils to be restricted, and the refrigerator not to cool. Check the evaporator coils to determine if they are frosted over. If the evaporator coils are frosted over, test each component of the defrost system after clearing any restrictions to the cooling fan and defrosting with a hair dryer.
Cause 2
The evaporator fan motor draws cold air over the evaporator coils and circulates it throughout the freezer. If the evaporator fan is not working, the freezer or refrigerator will not cool adequately. To determine if the evaporator fan motor is defective, try turning the fan blade by hand. If the fan blade does not turn freely, bench test it for function and use a multimeter to test the motor windings for continuity. If the windings do not have continuity, (very odd) replace the evaporator fan motor. Cause 3
Damper Control Assembly The air damper control opens and closes to let the proper amount of cold air into the refrigerator compartment. If the damper does not open properly, it won't let enough cold air into the refrigerator. Check the damper control to determine if it is broken or stuck closed or that an inadvertent bump has shut it off to the refrigerator compartment

Apr 09, 2016 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

Where is the evaporator fan motor? My Freezer and fridge would quit cooling/freezing. I took the back panel off in the freezer a week ago and the evaporator coils were completely frozen over with ice. I...


I do not believe the problem is the fan. sounds like the frig. is low on Freon this is what will cause the ice build up. you need to find the leak, you can do this by spraying soapy water on coil tubes & watch for bubbles. repair leak & recharge.

May 25, 2015 | Samsung RS261MDBP Side by Side...

1 Answer

Need manual for dac 8075ee air conditioner


I split this into 3 sections since I'm verbose.
1. Reasons to use it
2. Theory behind a/c and how it works
3. Steps you need to take

1. This is an easy method of reducing your FE losses due to A/C while retaining some of its benefits. I have to use my A/C when I'm dressed up in a shirt and tie as well as when my wife and/or baby are in the car, and I use this to keep everyone, including my wallet, happy.

2. Basic air conditioner theory: Your air conditining is operated by an engine driven compressor, then two "radiators"; a high pressure, hot one that is warmer than the outside air, and a low pressure, cold one that is cooler than outside air. Thermodynamically speaking, when the compressor does work on vaporized refrigerant to compress it into a liquid, its temperature increases. This is an adiabatic process. The high pressure refrigerant travels from the compressor to the condenser, which is in front of your car's engine-cooling radiator. Since it's now very hot, it loses energy to the outside air flowing through it. After losing energy, it travels to the inside of the car, passes through an expansion valve that allows a small amount of refrigerant to pass through. The refrigerant then enters the evaporator core, an area of low pressure. The liquid refrigerant evaporates, absorbing energy from the air inside your car, and then returns to the compressor.
Your compressor does not run all the time your car is on; it also doesn't run all the time your a/c is turned on. Most cars' expansion valves are thermostatic; they work to maintain a constant temperature within the evaporator core. If the expansion valve only allows a small amount of refrigerant through, the pressure in the high side of the system doesn't drop. A sensor detects this and disengages the clutch on your a/c compressor.
Therefore, if you do what you can to keep the evaporator core cool, you can decrease the percent of time your compressor is running.

3. What to do: Two things will allow you to keep your evaporator core cool and your compressor clutched off. First, always use the recirculate function on your climate control. Already cool, dry air flowing through the evaporator won't warm it up as much as warming fresh air from outside.
If your car doesn't have a recirculate switch, chances are that it has a "normal a/c" and a "max a/c". Use the MAX! This seems counter-intuitive, but since the recirculating a/c works better, it's labeled as such, and it's also more efficient.
Second, once you get your car to a cool enough temperature, adjust the blower fan to the lowest speed setting. You still get cold air blowing on you, but the smaller volume of air that flows through the evaporator, the cooler it will stay.
Using these two steps, you can have your a/c and afford to eat for dinner too

Jun 08, 2012 | Danby DAC8003D Air Conditioner

1 Answer

The fan is working. The fridge, freezer & coils are not iced up. There is good room for air circulation. I vacuumed most of the dust from the coils, etc. The compressor is just slightly warm to the...


Good day to you sir John,


A refrigerator or freezer that doesn't cool well enough may have a problem with its evaporator coils, condenser, or condenser fan motor. Frost build-up on evaporator coils, or condenser coils that are covered with dirt, dust, or lint can reduce how well a refrigerator can cool. If you notice ice getting thicker on the inside walls, inside bottom, or inside ceiling of the freezer, you have what is called a frost build-up. The problem is either with warm, moist air getting in through an old inefficient door gasket or the defrost system. Self-defrosting refrigerators have coils and a cooling fan that need to be cleaned regularly. If the coils get coated with any contaminants, they may not cool the refrigerator properly. The coils are usually thin and black and they go through fins that dissipate heat, just like a car's radiator. They are located behind the lower kick-panel or on the back of the refrigerator. To clean them, turn the power off and use this condenser coil cleaning brush, or this condenser coil cleaning brush, and your vacuum cleaner. Even if your coils are below the refrigerator, you won't be able to get to all the condenser coils from the front, so it's a good idea to pull the refrigerator out and clean the coils from the front and the rear of the refrigerator. Give the fan a dusting as well. Sometimes other things can be the reason behind poor cooling, like the condenser fan motor. Anytime the freezer fan is running, the condenser fan should also be running.
A frost build-up inside the refrigerator usually means that there is a problem in the self-defrost system. You may even have damaged door gaskets. When you open the refrigerator door, you also let in a blast of warm, often humid air. This moisture usually freezes onto the evaporator coils immediately. Self-defrost refrigerators are supposed to self-defrost between two and four times out of every 24 hour time-frame. They basically turn off for a few minutes several times a day. A defrost heater kicks on to melt any frost build-up on these coils, which allows the frost and ice to melt, then it drains off to the pan underneath most refrigerators. Unfortunately, when a defrost component fails, too much frost builds up on the evaporator coils. When this happens, the circulating fan can't draw air over these coils. With no air flow over the evaporator coils, the refrigerator compartment will lose its cool.
To determine if the self defrost system is faulty, it's best to remove all the food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn your thermostat to the Off setting, and just leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours, and let the refrigerator defrost. Keep an eye out for an overflow of water from the drip pan on the bottom of the refrigerator.
After everything has completely melted away, set the thermostat back to a regular setting. If your refrigerator starts operating properly, the symptoms lead to there being a problem with one of three other components in the self-defrosting system, the defrost heater, the defrost timer, or the defrost thermostat.
If, after testing these components, the refrigerator still doesn't get your foods cool, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level and you will need to contact a professional appliance repair person.

I hope this solution will be helpful...

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Oct 23, 2011 | Frigidaire PLHT217TA Top Freezer...

1 Answer

Hi, I have an Admiral Refrigerator Model Number RSCA207AAM. I think it was purchased over 12 years ago. The refrigerator part is not cooling enough. Can you tell me how old this refrigerator is? Is...


Good day!!!!

A refrigerator or freezer that doesn't cool well enough may have a problem with its evaporator coils, condenser, or condenser fan motor. Frost build-up on evaporator coils, or condenser coils that are covered with dirt, dust, or lint can reduce how well a refrigerator can cool. If you notice ice getting thicker on the inside walls, inside bottom, or inside ceiling of the freezer, you have what is called a frost build-up. The problem is either with warm, moist air getting in through an old inefficient door gasket or the defrost system. Self-defrosting refrigerators have coils and a cooling fan that need to be cleaned regularly. If the coils get coated with any contaminants, they may not cool the refrigerator properly. The coils are usually thin and black and they go through fins that dissipate heat, just like a car's radiator. They are located behind the lower kick-panel or on the back of the refrigerator. To clean them, turn the power off and use this condenser coil cleaning brush, or this condenser coil cleaning brush, and your vacuum cleaner. Even if your coils are below the refrigerator, you won't be able to get to all the condenser coils from the front, so it's a good idea to pull the refrigerator out and clean the coils from the front and the rear of the refrigerator. Give the fan a dusting as well. Sometimes other things can be the reason behind poor cooling, like the condenser fan motor. Anytime the freezer fan is running, the condenser fan should also be running.
A frost build-up inside the refrigerator usually means that there is a problem in the self-defrost system. You may even have damaged door gaskets. When you open the refrigerator door, you also let in a blast of warm, often humid air. This moisture usually freezes onto the evaporator coils immediately. Self-defrost refrigerators are supposed to self-defrost between two and four times out of every 24 hour time-frame. They basically turn off for a few minutes several times a day. A defrost heater kicks on to melt any frost build-up on these coils, which allows the frost and ice to melt, then it drains off to the pan underneath most refrigerators. Unfortunately, when a defrost component fails, too much frost builds up on the evaporator coils. When this happens, the circulating fan can't draw air over these coils. With no air flow over the evaporator coils, the refrigerator compartment will lose its cool.
To determine if the self defrost system is faulty, it's best to remove all the food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn your thermostat to the Off setting, and just leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours, and let the refrigerator defrost. Keep an eye out for an overflow of water from the drip pan on the bottom of the refrigerator.
After everything has completely melted away, set the thermostat back to a regular setting. If your refrigerator starts operating properly, the symptoms lead to there being a problem with one of three other components in the self-defrosting system, the defrost heater, the defrost timer, or the defrost thermostat.
If, after testing these components, the refrigerator still doesn't get your foods cool, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level and you will need to contact a professional appliance repair person.

I hope this information will be helpful...Thank you for consulting fixya..

Aug 31, 2011 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

I have a whirlpool refrigerator model #GT15HTYMQ81


The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited. Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system: Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets. The defrost timer The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

Aug 21, 2011 | Whirlpool GT1SHTXM Top Freezer...

1 Answer

Compressor working, cooling coils hot, but unit won't cool below


When you say fully charged, did you weigh the refrigerant? These small systems cannot tolerate overcharging by even small amounts because it will result in overpressure on the suction side. If there's too much refrigerant you get hot coils and cool but not cold evaporator. I typically pump the refrigerant into a recovery tank and then weigh it back in to get exactly the amount on the mfg label.

Dec 12, 2009 | True 598-TSSU608ADA SandwichSalad Unit 155...

1 Answer

Fridge-side not cold enough


A refrigerator or freezer that is cooling, but cooling poorly, may have a problem in one of several areas:

Evaporator coils
Condenser
Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils or a condenser that is clogged with dust, lint, and dirt.

Evaporator coils Poor cooling is often the result of a heavy frost build-up on the evaporator coils. You can't see these coils without removing a panel on the inside of your freezer. A sure sign that there is a build-up is the presence of any frost or ice build-up on the inside walls, floor, or ceiling of the freezer. Such a frost build-up usually indicates a problem in the self-defrosting system or damaged door gaskets.

The refrigerator is supposed to self-defrost approximately four times in every 24 hour period. If one of the components in the self-defrosting system fails, the refrigerator continues to try to cool. Eventually, though, so much frost builds up on the evaporator coils that the circulating fan can't draw air over the coils. There may still be a small amount of cooling because the coils are icy, but with no air flow over the coils, cooling in the refrigerator compartment is quite limited.

Here's an inexpensive, though inconvenient, way to determine if the problem is with the self-defrosting system. Remove all of the perishable food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn the thermostat in the refrigerator to Off, and leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours. (Be sure to have several towels ready in case the melting frost and ice causes the drip pan to overflow). This allows the refrigerator to defrost "manually." When the frost and ice build-up has completely melted away, turn the thermostat back to a normal setting. If the refrigerator then cools properly, it indicates a problem with one of three components in the self-defrosting system:

  • The defrost timer

  • The defrost thermostat (also called the bi-metal switch)

  • The defrost heater

If it still does not cool properly, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level or the compressor. You may need to consult with a qualified appliance repair technician to further diagnose the problem


Jul 29, 2009 | Hotpoint HSS25GDMWW Side by Side...

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