Question about SanDisk Sansa m250 MP3 Player

1 Answer

MP3's appear on the player but not on the desktop

On my player I have a bunch of songs that are protected WMA's; I also have MP3's of things I recorded off of vinyl. For some weird reason, the groups that I downloaded from MP3 appear on the player, and can be played; however they do not show up on the desktop, or under Media Player, or Rhapsody. To them it is like those songs don't exist. The problem is that now I cannot delete these songs. I cannot figure out how to get to them, short of reformatting the unit. Any ideas?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 8,596 Answers

Change your settings in Windows Media Player to allow the display of those songs

Posted on Jul 06, 2008

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

On all tracks when i press play i get message ''media engine error! drm license not available'' i have a gogear sa1942


Your song (.WMA) are copy protected by 'Microsoft Windows Media digital rights management (DRM)' and appears to be requesting a license key which needs to be loaded to your player.
Solution:
- Media Player will automatically load those licences keys to your player for your authorised music/media files.
- Alternatively, remove DRM (for song that you own ...) by some third party means software (including burning them on CD with appropriate options)
- Use alternative songs encoding (such as .mp3) that do not this protection.

Dec 28, 2009 | Philips Audio Players & Recorders

Tip

How to Convert Protected AAC to MP3 / WMA


Apple is now promoting its AAC music pricing at 3 leyers across the board by encouraging consumer to upgrade to iTunes Plus for DRM-free, although Apple listed various advantage of music in AAC over MP3, people keep looking for "AAC to MP3 converter" to convert AAC to MP3/WMA, why?

Why Convert Protected AAC to MP3 / WMA?

(1). iTunes AAC music has two types --- DRM protected AAC (with .m4p file name); Non-DRM AAC (with .m4a file name).
(2). For Non-DRM AAC (M4A) music, most of the popular digital devices can't play them, for example, if you have iriver and want enjoy iTunes M4A music on it, sorry, no luck!
(3). For DRM protected AAC (M4P) songs, only Apple's ipod, iPhone are authorized to play them, of course, with limited number of iPod players and computers to which to transfer.
(4). MP3 and WMA are the most popular audio formats for most of the digital players including PSP, PS3, Zune, Xbox 360, creative Zen, Archos, Iriver, Blackberry, Samsung, Sonywalkman, HTC, Sansa, Cowon etc.

Converting protected AAC to MP3/WMA needs a all-round application that can remove DRM and convert AAC to MP3 both.

Why Choose DRM Music Converter to convert Protected AAC to MP3 / WMA?

DRM Music Converter can:
(1). Remove DRM from online stores like iTunes, Zune Marketplace, Napster, Rhapsody etc.
(2). Support input audio formats: protected AAC (M4P), protected WMA, M4A, MP3, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA.
video formats: M4V (protected MP4), protected WMV, protected ASF.
(3). Support output audio formats: WMA, M4A, MP3, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA.

Then you can:
(1). Convert AAC to MP3, WMA, M4A, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA;
Convert AAC (M4A) music to MP3, WMA, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA;
Convert protected WMA to MP3, M4A, WMA, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA;
Convert protected M4V / WMV / ASF video to MP3, M4A, WMA, AC3, OGG, APE, WAV, MKA.
(2). Transfer iTunes music on non-Apple AAC-compatible digital players; Play protected WMA at will.
(3). Play and share music in whatever format on whatever player you l

How to Convert Protected AAC to MP3 / WMA?

1. Free download Aimersoft Music Converter and run it, then add your protected files:

e3043af.jpg

2. Settings for converting AAC to MP3:

6535563.jpg

3. When go through the first 2 steps, hit 'start' button lower-righted on the main window, converting AAC to MP3 will be soon done, then you can freely enjoy or share iTunes AAC music on your digital palyers!


on Jul 28, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I can't get my MP3 to download and play WMA Format


Here is the asterisk behind WMA compatibility - there are two types of WMA files - protected and unprotected. 90% of WMA files are DRM-protected, hence they are either not usable in mp3 players that say they can play WMA's, or the song has a DRM restriction on it that prevents it from being played on an mp3 player without purchasing additional rights.

To avoid the problem completely, only download songs that are in mp3 format. It may be more expensive initially, but they are better in the long-term - even if you found a WMA file that eventually works with your mp3 player, the protected WMA files have an expiration date, so they would stop working after 30 days, 90 days, 1 year, or 2 years depending on the specific license for each song. Mp3 files never expire, never give you error messages, and work with nearly (if not all) 100% of mp3 players.

Good luck!

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Mar 30, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Protected mode on songs


Some (most) WMA and AAC files are protected and some are unprotected - you cannot "unprotect" them, except by downloading illegal-to-use software such as Tunebite.

To avoid a future recurrence of this problem, only load songs that are in mp3 format onto your player. They are all unprotected.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Mar 24, 2009 | Insignia Kix MP3 Player

1 Answer

About adding songs to ZEN Mosaic


The first one is a DRM error and should be solved by the FairUse4WM which you can download for free from the following link.:
http://undrm.info/remove-DRM-protection/FairUse4WM-freeware-DRM-removal-Windows-software-Strip-copy-protection-from-WMV-ASF-WMA-Windows-Media-Player.htm
This will rip the DRM off the tracks and you should be able to listen to the without problem.

The other problem could be caused by codec differences. With GSpot you can check what codec was used to create the mp3s /both the working ones and the others/. If different codecs appear than you just have to reconvert the non working ones using the codec which workes.

You can download GSpot from here, for free.:
http://www.headbands.com/gspot/

Feb 14, 2009 | Creative Labs Creative Technology Zen MP3...

1 Answer

Wont copy songs to mp3 player because of write protection


To adjust the copy protection setting on your ripped music files,
  1. Open the Tools tab at the top of your Windows Media Player.
  2. Select Options and then select the Rip Music tab.
  3. Under this menu, you will be able to choose the type of music file as well as the quality with which you would like to save the music.
  4. Make sure the box next to Copy protect music is left unchecked.
Your GPX player has the ability to play music files in both the MP3 and WMA format. Make sure to use MTP when transferring copy-protected WMA files.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Nov 04, 2008 | GPX MW3836 MP3 Player

1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Transferring Audio Filles


The songs are perhaps in the wrong format.  This player will not accept copy-protected iTunes (AAC) files.  Also, the license on your files may not permit transfer to mp3 players. Definitely check the bitrates on your files, b/c this Sony can only accept certain ranges of bit rate.
This is my general spiel about music formats, but note that your Sony does accept DRM-protected files with transfer rights, so not everything in the following blurb applies fully to you: All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.
-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 09, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

Device is operating slowly, reset...


Make sure the device is fully charged. Make sure the songs are in the correct format - Mp3 is best; iTunes/AAC will not work; check the bit rate of the songs to make sure they are at acceptable levels.
Also, make sure you are using the Media Manager to convert files. Formatting the player, in this case, might have been a bad idea, b/c it is possible that it erased key system files - I do not see where Sony has the original firmware/software for this particular product on their website, so it is going to be difficult to reload it if that is the case.
Here is some general info: I have seen quite a few threads in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in theMp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” 
All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 04, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

Unknown Format


It sounds like these wma files have DRM protection.

You can still play these songs on your mp3 player, but you must use Windows Media Player to transfer them.

To do this, connect your mp3 player to your computer, then open Windows Media Player. In WMP select "Sync" & you should see your mp3 player in the right-hand pane. Drag & drop your wma files across. It's a slow way to do it, but the only way to transfer wma files with DRM.

Let me know how you get on!

Jan 05, 2008 | Nextar MA566 MP3 Player

Not finding what you are looking for?
SanDisk Sansa m250 MP3 Player Logo

48 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top SanDisk Audio Players & Recorders Experts

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Gyula Lacz

Level 3 Expert

486 Answers

Mohamed Ismail
Mohamed Ismail

Level 3 Expert

462 Answers

Are you a SanDisk Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...