Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-T3 Digital Camera

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Over Exposure in bright lights

I must have turned on something on the camera. Thw pictures were always great and now they over exposed particularly in bright light . we have just been to Gran Canaria . Pictures over exposed. Have lost instruction booklet where can we get a replacement. Thanks

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Please click Sony Support to download user manual of DSC-T3

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

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When taking a picture in daylight and the background is bright the background comes out as white-no colour. I've tried fill in flash and also exposure compensation to no avail. Very frustrating-please...


Your camera is setting its exposure to your subject, which if it's darker than the background will cause the background to over expose. You need to set the exposure to the background which then will cause your background to be properly exposed and your foreground or subject to be darker. With a point n shoot camera, accomplishing this might be a difficult task. But if you expose to the background and use the fill flash, you should then get your properly exposed image.

Jun 04, 2014 | Nikon COOLPIX S5100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Downloaded pix from Rebel XT turn out really dark on my PC


Hi Dborror,
This is a very nice camera, it would not be good not to use it, because of a silly problem such as this.
The first thing to remember, is that the camera has a very bright light to look through the photos to prevent glare and other problems.
  1. Look at the histogram when you shoot, may need to compensate the exposure, make sure it isnt set to something by factory default.
  2. Another factor to consider with fluorescent lights is that they 'flicker' 60 times a second rather than being on continuously like an incandescent bulb. This isn't obvious to the naked eye but if your shutter speed is less than 1/60 it can, and will, affect your exposure.
  3. One of your problems is that you expect the result out of the camera to be perfect.With most digitals, and with this camera you might have to do the tweaking yourself, the odd time. Personally most of my shots come out a bit on the dark side becuase I know that is better than being over exposed and I tweak in my editing programs.
I hope I've sheaded some light on your problem, and if your problem persists I'll mess around with mine to ee if I can help you a bit more. Have a good evening, and happy new year.

Dec 30, 2007 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Whenever I'll take a picture specially in outdoor enviroment, when I download the to my computer it seems the picture has so much light appearance. It's seems picture is over expose for the light...


It may be that you have inadvertently set your camera to shoot 'bracketing up' - ie over exposing for every shot. You need to look at the exposure ruler which looks something like this: l---l---l---l---l The centre bar is the correct exposure. But there is a little block that sits where you have got your +/- setting at. +/- is the sign for BRACKETING - where you tell the camera to over expose (+) or under expose (-). With Canon if the little block is to the right of the centre bar then you are telling the camera to over expose. Where is your little block? If it is to the right of the centre press your +/- button and turn the dial to the centre bar. NOTE: As digital cameras are WEAK in capturing highlights it is often better to shoot slightly under exposed - with your block set on the first or second horizontal line to the left of the centre bar. This means you are shooting 1/3 or 2/3 of an f/stop under exposed. Hope this helps.

Dec 31, 2010 | Canon PowerShot A470 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures bright on camera LCD and dark on computer


You can set the camera's "exposure compensation" to a higher number.

Jun 06, 2010 | Kodak EASYSHARE Z1485 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

3 Answers

Over exposure


Hey - have the same problem. All my still pictures are coming out overexposed, no matter what setting I use. Tried resetting, tried new battery, tried new memory card, tried different exposure settings. Nothing fixed it or affected it. However, my movie exposure works great so I can take movies just fine. Are you able to take movies with no overexposure?

Jul 25, 2008 | Canon Powershot SD450 / IXUS 55 Digital...

2 Answers

Canon Powershot S330 Picture Brightness Help!!!


It sounds like the camera exposure system is out of whack and may need to be serviced. You may want to ensure that exposure compensation is set to 0. Check one of your overexposed images with the display in the 'Detailed Display' mode (two lines of information at the bottom of the LCD). If the second item on the top line is not ±0, the exposure compensation is not at its default value. To set, put the camera in M(anual) shooting mode. Press the Exposure/White Balance button until you see a scale along the bottom of the LCD from -2 to +2. Use the left or right button to set it at 0. If the value is already at 0, you will probably need service.

Apr 28, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S330 / IXUS 330 Digital...

1 Answer

Nikon d50


the flashing means that the exposure is not correct for that area. if that area was the subject, then you might want to adjust the settings to reduce sensitivity in order to view that area correctly. if you spot meter the 'true subject' in the frame, there will often be areas outside that subject that are either brighter or more dimly lit. but exposure will be right for the subject. it can't all be correctly exposed if there is much variation in lighting. fill flashes will provide more light to the subject, thus resulting in a reduction in sensitivity of the resulting settings. (shorter exposure time or smaller aperture or a combination of both) and that will let the brighter areas move closer to 'not washing out' or being over exposed as some people refer to it. in either approach, its not a defect or problem unless it bothers you. the flashing just lets you know that you can modify settings if it matters that the photograph has high levels of contrast beyond what you may want. sometimes the subject is not in the center, and thus not metered for. but the framing is set to include something off to the side. you can reset exposure by adjusting exposure compensation so that while you are reading a darker area than that of the subject, you don't want the camera to use that area for light settings necessarily.
recap: exposure control via exposure compensation or fill flash
mark

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark


learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck
mark

Sep 01, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera...

2 Answers

One of the pictures has a great blue sky but the green tree is very dark and the other one has the green tree and very bright sky?


The two pictures were shot at dramatically different exposures - the "dark" one at 1/1600 shutter speed, f7.3, the "light" one at 1/320 shutter speed, f4.0. This accounts for the great difference, as the exposure conditions for the "light" one allowed much more light into the image during the exposure period. You didn't tell the whole story of how you set this up, I think you were shooting in a "spot" metering mode, where the particular exposure conditions the camera uses would vary considerably whether you were aiming at a dark area (making the picture light) or a light area (making the picture dark). I would make two recommendations: Switch your metering mode to "center weighted" (the mode labeled "[(•)]"), and also change your ISO setting to AUTO, as there would be no reason for shooting these photos at ISO 200 that I can think of.

Sep 04, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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