Question about Compaq Presario SR1000T (568657) PC Desktop

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Front panel Ac Switch failing to start computer.

The power company I have has had several power failures in the past and after one such power failure my computer failed to boot back up immediately. Pushing the power button resulted in no responce,... however after several attempts it booted fine. I had since left the computer running and began researching the problem. When trying to start the computer the front panel switch LED lights up momentarily,... both the internal and external fan spin and then the computer goes dead again. Another power failure had occured. The hour long process of repeatedly pushing the switch usually resulted in many flickers and short bursts of power to the internal fans with an inevitably successful boot up. There has been no responce at all. No flickers, no fan movement, just a dead computer. Current suggestion is the power supply being faulty,... the LED light on the back of the AC Power Supply is always on when plugged in,... but,... if I unplug it and watch that LED light as I depress the Front panel switch,... it does not immediately go off. I believe the switch just isn't connecting anymore. Can you help me understand this problem and how I might fix it?

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Try these steps.
If Power supply light does not turn on (or no power supply LED)
Perform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure:
NOTE: If the Power Supply fan spins when the PC is turned on but the light does not come on, it is possible the LED is defective. If this is the case, use the section Power supply light comes on or flashes .
1. Disconnect everything from the PC, including the power cord.
2. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the computer. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
3. Replace the power cord with another power cord, like the one used by the monitor.
Test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
4. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America.
5. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position, wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location.
This ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region.
6. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
7. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.
8. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it.
9. Use a vacuum cleaner to remove the build-up of dust from the power supply fan vent holes. Make sure that the PC is turned off and that the power cord is plugged into a grounded outlet. Only use the end of the vacuum hose near the outside of the fan entrance.
Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.
10. If all of the above steps have been tried and the power supply light remains off, use the steps in the next section, use the next section Power supply light comes on or flashes , to reseat the cables and check the power switch connector.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • Ganesan Chandraiah
    Ganesan Chandraiah Jan 12, 2009

    If Power supply light on or flashes

    Perform the following steps, in order, until power is restored or it is determined that there is a hardware failure:

    CAUTION: This product contains components that are easily damaged by ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). To reduce the chance of ESD damage, work over a non-carpeted floor, use a static dissipative work surface (like a conductive foam pad), and wear an ESD wrist strap that is connected to a grounded surface, like the metal frame of a PC.



    1. Disconnect everything from the computer, including the power cord.

    2. With the power cord disconnected , press the power button on the front of the computer for five seconds. Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.

    NOTE: If the power supply fan makes an inconsistent grinding sound or stops and starts erratically, replace the power supply

    3. With the power cord removed, flip the red voltage selector switch to the opposite position. Wait about five seconds, and then switch the red voltage selector switch back to its original location. Ensure that the voltage selector switch is on the correct setting, 115V for North America.

    Performing this step ensures that the voltage switch is engaged and set correctly for your country/region.

    Plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.

    4. Plug a lamp into the same outlet to see if the wall outlet has power. Try the computer in a different outlet in order to eliminate the outlet as a possible source of the issue. Test both to see if the wall outlets have power.

    5. Remove all extension cords, power strips, surge protectors and any converters that remove ground. Plug the power cable directly to the wall outlet. Test for power. If this fixes the issue, find the device that is causing the issue and do not use it.

    NOTE: If you find the device that was causing the problem was a surge protector, resetting a breaker or fuse on the surge protector may fix the issue.

  • Ganesan Chandraiah
    Ganesan Chandraiah Jan 12, 2009

    1. Remove all attached devices except for keyboard, mouse, and monitor.

    2. Remove any internal component that was recently added, such as video card, memory, CD, DVD, and hard drives. An added device may take more power than the power supply is rated for. If the problem goes away when the component is removed, the only option is to upgrade the power supply to power supply with a higher wattage rating.

    3. Check the power switch:

    a. With the power cord disconnected, press the power button on the front of the PC. The button should release easily and not stick in the socket.

    · If the button sticks, it should be replaced or serviced.

    · If the power button does not stick and appears to be functioning, continue using these steps.

    b. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.

    c. Follow the wires from the power button on the front of the computer to their connection on the motherboard.

    d. Look at the power switch cables connected to the motherboard. If the cable has become disconnected, connect the power switch cable connector to the connector on the motherboard.

    e. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord and test to see if the computer can turn on. If not, continue using these steps.

    4. Find the defective part:

    a. With the power cord disconnected, remove the case or side panel.

    b. Disconnect all power cable connectors from their connectors on the motherboard and from the back of internal devices (the back of drives). Make sure to label or remember where each cable connects for future reference.

    c. Replace the side panel, plug in the power cord, and examine the light on the back of the power supply:

    · If the LED is on solid and is not flashing, the power supply is probably good and the problem is most likely caused by a defective component (processor, memory, PCI card) or a defective motherboard. Have the computer serviced, or remove the components and replace them, one at a time, to find and replace the defective component.

    · If the LED is still flashing (it should not flash with all connectors removed), plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED still flashes, the power supply should be replaced.

    · If the LED light is now off, plug the power cable into a different power outlet that is known to be good. If the LED stays off, the power supply should be replaced.

    NOTE: If an electrical storm or power surge has recently occurred, then it is more likely that the power supply, the modem, or motherboard is damaged and requires replacement. If the power supply was damaged due to power outage or storm, this may not be covered under the "act of nature" policy in the warranty statement. Refer to the warranty statement that came with your computer for more information.

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Or you can buy a new power supply. because if you not qualified
best to leve it alone

Posted on Nov 20, 2013

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1 Answer

Computer wont come on


does it boot up completely or just a blink of logo or ?
could be power failure due to what?? power module, cpu chip fan
failure, clock/battery dead, ...just searching my mind for ideas.
could also be a motherboard capacitor over heating in which case
will fail completely at some point. remove chasis and check those round capacitors(like tiny oil barrels shape) all over MB. if bad they will be swollen at top where the + is. if cpu fan is not spinning then a failsafe error happens so cpu won't burn up. how old is machine?
also, ac adapter may be failing to provide power.

Aug 22, 2012 | Gateway ZX6800-03 All-in-One Refurbished...

1 Answer

My HP D530C does not power on. The power LED flashes 4 times. What is the fault? Pls let me know asap. Thanks.


HP xw6200 Workstation - Diagnostic LED Code: Four Flashes ISSUE: When the workstation is powered on, the front LED might flash red four times, once per second, followed by a two second pause. SOLUTION: The front LED flashing four times is a sign of a power failure. To fix this issue, complete the following steps:
  1. Open the access panel, and check to see if the four-wire power supply cable is properly connected to the system board.
  2. There may be a faulty device. Locate it by removing all devices and then reinstalling them one at a time until the workstation fails. Replace the device causing the failure. Continue adding devices to ensure all are functioning properly.
  3. Verify the power supply functionality, as follows:
    1. Disconnect AC power.
    2. Remove all internal power supply cables from the system board.
    3. Plug in AC power.
      • If the power supply fan spins, and the BIST LED illuminates, then the power supply is good. Replace the system board.
      • If the power supply fan does not spin, or the BIST LED does not illuminate, replace the power supply.

Dec 13, 2011 | HP Compaq d530c PC Desktop

1 Answer

I reboot every once in a while and sometimes my computer will not turn on again. That is no power to screen or keyboard. The hard drive has the light on and you can hear the motor inside working?


This is directed to a desktop computer.

Bad Power Supply.

Weak voltage power rail.

[ There are three main voltage power rails, in a desktop computer Power Supply.

A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail

1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply

2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply ]

Enough power to light LED lights, maybe spin fans, but not enough power to turn the Processor on.

A) ALL of the LED lights on at once use less than 1 Watt of power.

B) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

C) A typical processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power,

Depends on what Processor it is, as to how much is the maximum Wattage that it will use.

No Processor operating, there is nothing to find the Boot Record on the Harddrive.
The Harddrive just sits there, and spins in an endless loop.

[You are hearing a motor operating.
It is the Harddrive's spindle motor.
The motor that spins the Platters on the Spindle.
To explain,

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/hard-disk.htm ]

No Processor operating, No computer.
No computer operating, No Signal to the monitor.
(No video signal)

Do power supply's just go bad all of a sudden? You go to turn the computer on, and nada?
Yes, sort of.

Generally Electrolytic Capacitors go bad. They are the usual 'culprit'.
Electrolytic capacitors are used as Filters in a Power Supply.
They are used in the Input Stage, and Output Stage.

Simple explanation of an Electrolytic Capacitor's construction, is to state that it is a small aluminum 'can', that has Electrolytic paste inside.

When the paste goes 'bad' the paste develops a gas inside the aluminum 'can' case. (Hydrogen Gas)

The gas expands inside the case, and pushes against a seal on the bottom of the case, (Bung), and a partial split on the top of the case, (X or K)

When the seal at the top, and/or bottom is compromised the paste begins to leak out. (Oozes)

So much paste loss, and the capacitor can operate at a weakened state.
Too much paste loss, and the capacitor fails.

This is why the Power Supply can seem to work okay one day, and not on the next day.

(Electrolytic Capacitor failure. Details on motherboards, but the theory applies to electrolytic capacitors used in Power Supply's also,

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/

Most of the time Power Supply failure can be attributed to three main factors;

1) Computer is dirty inside, as well as inside the Power Supply.

2) Poor quality Power Supply used by pre-built computer manufacturer.

3) Power surge due to the utility company, or a lightening strike.

[Computer designers know that Electrolytic Capacitors will eventually fail.
They use capacitors that are 50 percent better than is needed.
As the capacitor breaks down, it eventually reaches the level needed ]

Regards,
joecoolvette

Dec 01, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Power won't stay on. I have unplugged the computer and reconnected and it still won't stay on.


carmanz1gal, and olik2,

Power won't stay on - Bad Power Supply

Computer restarts - Bad Motherboard

[olik2,

Bad Motherboard:
Electrolytic capacitors used in the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit, are failing, or have failed, is the general cause of motherboard failure.

Part of what the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit does, is to regulate Voltage for the Processor.

A Processor must have a Steady, 'Clean', supply of Voltage, and it must be within a VERY tight tolerance range.

Electrolytic Capacitor failure, also applies to the Power Supply 'tip' you read.

When the 20/24-pin ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard, it supplies power to the Motherboard, Processor, Ram Memory, optical drives, cooling fans, and a graphics card, if used.

(Provided the graphics card does not require additional power, from the power supply, via an attached power cable)

1) ALL the LED lights use less than 1 Watt of power

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts

3) A typical Processor can use up to 51 to 125 Watts.
Depends on what Processor it is.

Unplug the 20/24-pin ATX main power cable, and the failing Electrolytic Capacitors in the Power Supply, have a chance to build up a full charge again.

[A capacitor slowly builds up a charge, then releases it all at once.

Think of a capacitor as a large swimming pool, being slowly filled up by a garden hose. Then one wall of the pool is taken down all at once ]

Plug the 20/24-pin ATX main power cable back in, and the stored charge is enough to turn the Processor on, and keep it running.
It's all due to the Electrolytic paste's chemical composition, and amount, at the time.

Electrolytic Capacitors used in the Power Supply, and on the motherboard, are essentially small aluminum 'cans', with electrolytic paste inside.

There are three strips inside the 'can' case.
1) One is a metal strip, and is thin aluminum foil. The Positive lead is connected to it.
It is the Conducting strip.

2) One lead is also a thin aluminum foil, and has a non-conducting medium applied to it.
It is the Non-Conducting strip, and has the Negative lead attached to it.

3) The last strip is composed of a paper-like substance, and is soaked with Electrolytic paste.

The Electrolytic paste soaked strip, is placed in-between the two metal strips, and all three strips are rolled up tightly, then placed in the aluminum can case.

At the top of the aluminum can case is a flat, thin aluminum disk.
The disk has a shape etched part way into it.
The shape is usually a K or X.

At the bottom of the can case where the Positive, and Negative lead protrude, there is another seal.
It is called a Bung.
The Bung is a round, flat synthetic rubber disk.
The Negative, and Positive lead protrude through it.

(The above is a description of a Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor)

When an Electrolytic Capacitor starts to fail, there is a gas developed inside the case. (Hydrogen Gas)
The gas expands, and pushes against the case, and the upper, and lower seals.

The top seal X or K will break open with enough pressure, and this action allows the Electrolytic paste to be pushed out.
(Oozes out)

The bottom Bung seal can also be compromised. One side of the rubber-like disk, will push out of the bottom of the can case.
This too allows the Electrolytic paste to be pushed out.

So much paste loss, and the capacitor will operate at a weakened state.
Too much paste loss, and the capacitor will fail ]


carmanz1gal,

You have a bad Power Supply.
Weak Voltage power rail.

Causes of Power Supply failure:

1) Most of the time due to the inside of the computer is dirty, as well as the inside of the Power Supply.

Computer unplugged from power, computer case open, a can of compressed air for computers used on a regular basis as needed, could prevent this problem.

A computer that is dirty inside is a Very common thing.

If one does not know how to open the computer case, or use the correct procedures, it may seem a daunting task.
To have a computer tech do the procedure cost bucks.

2) There are outside sources that can also add to the detriment of a Power Supply.
Power surges from the power utility company, brownouts, and the power utility company does not always supply THE correct voltage.

Example:
In the US, the common Voltage used is 120 Volts. The utility company is only required to keep the voltage between 108 to 127 Volts.
However the transformer on the utility pole outside your home, that feeds electricity to your home, may be stepped up too far.

I have had instances, where I had to call the utility company to have a lineman, turn the voltage down on the stepdown transformer to my home.
It was at 135 Volts!~

(If you have lightbulbs that seem to not last very long, you may want to have a licensed electrician, check the AC voltage amount coming into your home)

3) Lifecycle:

A computer Power Supply's usage is rated in hours.
So many hours of usage is it's Lifecycle.
Your Power Supply may be at the end of it's Lifecycle.

What HP Compaq d330 computer is it?

http://h20180.www2.hp.com/apps/Lookup?h_lang=en&h_cc=us&cc=us&h_page=hpcom&lang=en&h_client=S-A-R163-1&h_query=HP+Compaq+Desktop+D330&submit.x=9&submit.y=4

Jun 22, 2010 | HP Compaq Business Desktop d330

1 Answer

We have the same power supply failures


Hi,
I've seen PSU's go before but not how that's described (maybe in rare case)
If HP are/were sending units out like that it beggars belief that there is no recall because of the danger posed. A couple of years ago i remember laptop lithium batteries being recalled, but this case is exceptional because they are plugged in to a mains power supply so imagine the possible law suits that HP could be looking at!!!
Thanks for bringing this to our attention, i will be certainly informing my customers to be aware of this model and emailing HP themselves of this potentially lethal failure.


Many thanks

Jun 11, 2009 | HP Compaq d530 SFF PC Desktop

1 Answer

The Monitor Will Not stop saying emachine


You may have a failed motherboard or a failing/failed power supply unit (PSU) then. Failure of motherboards is usually due to breaking capacitors. A few years ago a capacitor company stole the "recipe" for making capacitors from another company and tried to make their own, unfortunately they did not get the ingredients right and the capacitors started breaking after 2-3 years of use. They sold these capacitors at very cheap prices and a lot of computer companies and power supply makers bought them. This is easy to diagnose. Look for capacitors (caps) (they look like little tiny soda cans) on your motherboard (mobo). They should be perfectly flat on top and not bulged or swelling or leaking anything. The dead giveaway is the fact that you are not getting anything after the "splash" screen. There are a few companies that will repair broken capacitor issues. Also if you add a bunch of extra components (bigger video cards, more drives, etc) without upgrading the power supply you can suffer underpowered situations and that can cause internal parts to fail.
To eliminate some other stuff you could remove the memory and disconnect all the power plugs from the drives and then try to start it up. If it does not change the behavior at all (no beeps, no change in flashing lights or move past the e-machines display) then you probably have motherboard issues. If you have another PSU that has the same or greater output watts you can try replacing that first. Make sure when disconnecting the memory chips (sticks) that you touch the metal on the inside of the case first to discharge static electricity. If it does change the behavior add 1 component or item back at a time to see what you can find out. Post back with what you find. And remember a bad PSU does not mean no power, just not enough to run the computer. Let us know.

May 17, 2009 | E-Machines etower 466id PC Desktop

4 Answers

My pc beeped twice and nothing came


Lack of video signal is usually 1 of 3 things, Power supply (PSU), Video card or Motherboard (mobo).
Situation #1: If you get a blank screen and no sounds or movement it either indicates that the power supply unit (PSU) has failed or something on the motherboard has failed, preventing normal startup.
Situation #1A: You might get some power lights coming on and some fans spinning but the video output does not happen, usually indicates that motherboard or PSU is going out or has gone out. Occasionally it will be due to a weak (damaged) PSU.
Situation #2: If you get sounds (normal Windows startup sounds) and lights but nothing on the screen then it indicates a failed or loose video card.
Always try a different power outlet that you know is working. (Eliminate the easy stuff first!)
If it is out of warranty, try opening up the case, with the power off, of course. If you have Sit #2 and have a video card that you can reseat (take out and then put back in) try that. If it is onboard video then you may have to buy a video card for it.
Also take this time to inspect the capacitors on the motherboard (they look like tiny soda cans) and check for tops that are bulging, swelling or leaking anything. Capacitors should be perfectly flat on top. If you find these then your motherboard is bad (well technically the capacitors on your motherboard are bad). The bad caps will need replacing to fix (not a job for an amateur). If it passes the visual inspection then it may just be your power supply is bad. Notice that a bad PSU does not mean you are getting no power, just not enough to start and run the computer.
A few years ago a company stole the recipe for making capacitors and started making their own capacitors at really cheap prices. The stolen "recipe" was not complete and not correct so these caps started failing after about 2-3 years of use. Emachines, DELL and Gateway were the computer companies most affected by the bad capacitor issues, although any of the big companies could have the same problem. These bad caps also affected power supply makers.
Do you hear anything else during startup, beeps, fans or drives spinning, lights on the front or back of computer flashing or lit up? Do you hear the Windows starting sound?
Let us know more then we can troubleshoot better. Do you have the 4 diagnostic (A,B,C,D) on the rear of the machine? What is the front power light on the CPU doing?

Apr 29, 2009 | Dell Dimension 2400 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Motherboard failure


Failure of motherboards is usually due to breaking capacitors. A few years ago a capacitor company stole the "recipe" for making capacitors from another company and tried to make their own, unfortunately they did not get the ingredients right and the capacitors started breaking after 2-3 years of use. They sold these capacitors at very cheap prices and a lot of computer companies and power supply makers bought them. This is easy to diagnose. Look for capacitors (caps) (they look like little tiny soda cans) on your motherboard (mobo). They should be perfectly flat on top and not bulged or swelling or leaking anything. The dead giveaway is the fact that you are not getting a monitor signal and if you listen to your computer as it starts up, a few of the devices may not start (hard drive, etc). A failed video card will also give you "No signal message", but the computer should sound normal when starting up. Mobos are usually expensive to replace because the computer makers have them made especially for them and only order so many. They usually do not have a lot of extras laying around. There are a few companies that will repair broken capacitor issues. Hope this explains why they can fail. They can also fail if overheated (like when a case cooling fan fails), the cpu is overclocked and not cooled down (which raises temps), the power supply fails or by lightning and power surges. Also if you add a bunch of extra components without upgrading the power supply you can suffer underpowered situations.

Mar 11, 2009 | Compaq PRESARIO SR1475CL AMD Athlon 64...

1 Answer

No Power / Start-up


if the power button on the front of the tower has no indications, then you most likely have a failure of the power supply.

Open the tower, and inspect for burnt wires. If you find no burnt wires, remove all PCI expansion card and all external connections, then connect the power cord and try to turn on. If no power, then you will most likely need to replace the power supply.

It is the least expensive part to replace on a no power situation. If replacing the power supply fails, then the front IO panel (Power button board) is next, then the motherboard is the 3rd most likely part that may have failed.

May 17, 2008 | Dell Dimension 5100 (D51L1) PC Desktop

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