Question about Shaw Robert RS-9420 Thermostat

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WHITE ROGERS THERMOSTAT

THEREMOSTAT READS 90 DEGREES HOUSE IS FREEZING HEATER WILL NOT TURN ON. HOW CAN I GET IT TO WORK? AIR CONDITIONING WILL TURN ON TRIED IT.

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Hey, did you ever figure out how to fix this?? Mine is doing the same now.

Posted on Jan 19, 2013

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My robertshaw 9620 thermostat is stuck on 70 and i can not change setting frim temp or time.


Here's how I fixed my Robertshaw thermostat that was stuck at a 70 degree reading for almost 2 monthes. When I turned on the air conditioner or heater it wouldn't stay on. I removed the cover panel and dusted off the inside which the guy at local hardware store suggested. That didn't work. Then I noticed the words "reset" right on the green circuit board on the left side. There's a very small silver button. I pressed on it and everything reset. Less than a minute later the thermostat is reading the correct room temperature. Now my air conditioner and heater are working properly.

Mar 16, 2014 | Robertshaw 9620 digital...

1 Answer

Just cut on 8 year old Goodman CPLE24-1 AC for the summer. Ran 8 hours fine, Next morning noticed outside unit running, very little cool air blowing out of inside floor vents (like the blower fan was...


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

I think I have it covered above. Let me know if you need something more specific. Thank you. Roger

Apr 12, 2011 | Goodman CPLE24-1 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

The air conditioner will work for a while but then shut down by itself.


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Please read the above paragraph and see if we can narrow the possibilities. How long does it stay off? Does it restart by itself? Does it blow any cold air while running? Thank you. Roger

Apr 11, 2011 | Sharp AF-S100MX Thru-Wall/Window Air...

1 Answer

Unit only stays on for a couple of minutes before shutting off


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Does this help to narrow it down for me? How long does it run? How do you restart it? Roger

Apr 11, 2011 | LG LS-K1830CL Cool Mini Split Air...

1 Answer

There is no cool air coming through my vents from my Lennox Hp13 heat pump. Only room temperature air seems to come through.What might be wrong?


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Take a look at everything above. Let me know what type of help you need. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Have an Amana air command 80 sse... and a HOT house! The AC comes on for a few minutes and then shuts off. The filter is clean... am wondering if there's a reset button. I have looked all around and...


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know. Roger

Most condensing units have low pressure safety switches in them. If your system is low on refrigerant, the compressor will run a little and shut off. When the pressures across the compressor equalize, it will come back on. This cycle will repeat on till enough gas has leaked to stop resetting the pressure switch. If this is what is happening, shut the condenser off. Short cycling will over heat the compressor. You will need a technician to find and fix the leak. Also to recharge your system when repaired. Let me know if I failed to help. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Hi- how do i add refrigerant to a rheem classic super quiet 80?


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know. Roger

There are service ports on the ends of the two copper lines at the condenser. Be VERY careful not to get any air in the system. Air carries moisure which will create acid and destroy the system. Don't touch the the smaller line. Pressure there is usually over 200 PSI. You sound like you have done this before. If not, let me know. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

PA10JA048-H Payne Air Conditioner outside unit not working but is getting power from circuit breakers. Need help.


Please read through the following and see if you can pin point the problem. Write back if you need with more information and I'll walk you through what ever you find. Roger
Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Flame symbol showing on theremostat


It's not your thermostat. Go to where your heating system is and give us a make and model number so we may help you.

Feb 11, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Thermostat sensor is not reading correctly


No you need to change your t,stat. Go to home depot or Lowes and get one easy to install Any problems please get back to me I will walk you thru. Rus

Oct 29, 2009 | Honeywell Electronic Programmable...

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