Question about Cameras

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Haze behind front lens of Canon FD 50mm Macro lens

I can't figure how to remove the front lens. The shade in the barrel which sits on top of the lens rotates but doesn't unscrew. I think if I could get it out there would be a ring holding the lens in place (like the rear) which could be removed with a spanner wrench. Anybody know how to remove that shade to get to the lens, and then remove the lens?

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  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    I don't see where the clip locking may be or how to uplift the assembly without cracking the plastic edge. Could you provide more info please.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    Thanks but the link isn't working...is there an alternate address?

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    I tried the filter wrench before my original posting...the lens mount itself remains steady and the lens shade rotates freely but doesn't unscrew or show any signs of extracting itself. I originally thought maybe very fine threads, but gave it 20 full rotations and measured it with a micrometer and no forward or rearward movement.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    Sorry Gowthank, you're mistaking removing the lens from the camera. I'm talking about removing the front element of the lens to clean it.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    Sorry, that doesn't address the issue of how to remove the lens element. The issue could well be between cemented surfaces, but the only way to tell is to remove the element and see where the haze lies. I already checked the rear elements and they are fine.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    The nFD version of this lens, unlike the previous SSC version has no name plate to remove...the cone like "lens shade" appears to be merely sitting in place, and can be freely rotated in place, but doesn't extract, fall out or have any forward (or rear) movement when rotated while holding the lens body (and front element) steady. There are no slots for a spanner wrench on it, no external screws...nothing.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    Sorry, but the question I am seeking help on has nothing to do with filters. It has to do with removing a shroud which is a part of the lens construction to get to the front element so that I can clean the rear side of it.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    Cation007 - I need to remove the front element to remove a haze which has been deposited on the rear side of it. I am familiar with removing most front lenses, but the unique construction of this one has me puzzled as a shroud (similar to a lens cap, but built into the housing) has to be removed before the front lens element can be removed. See earlier comments as to what has been tried and what is different on this lens front from most lenses.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    You guys are all missing it...this is not the breech lock version of the lens, but rather the nFD version. The breech lock looks like it would be a piece of cake once the lens ring and screws were removed. This model has no lens ring and no screws holding the shroud in place.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    I have the official Canon repair manual, this lens is not covered...the construction of this lens is nothing like the usual 1.8 or 1.4, or 1.2L lenses. Please read what I have been repeating...there is no lens name plate nor screws nor slots for a spanner wrench on the front of the lens. There is a deep funnel (approx. 1.5 inches deep) extending from the front of the barrel, immediately behind the filter ring threads on the inside of the barrel, to the outer face of the front element. THIS IS A DIFFERENT SETUP FROM THE OLDER VERSION OF THIS LENS, which has the features many responders suggested trying. Does anybody have specific experience with this lens???

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    The part you suggest removing with the rubber pad wrench rotates freely but does not extract...THAT IS WHAT I AM SEEKING HELP ON. The rear of the diaphragm blades are clear with no signs of oil...I checked that last night when I took out the rear elements. To fully see the front of the blades, I need to remove the front element...and in order to do that I need to remove the funnel shaped shroud...that's where the problem is. So far everybody's recommendations are applicable to an earlier version of the lens which has the screws and name flange holding it in place. This later version does not. I own both lenses and can tell you there is a significant difference, and in spite of having removed and cleaned lenses and diaphragm blades for other lenses...this one is a puzzle re the front element.

  • scl8 Jan 11, 2009

    A fine link, but it doesn't address my issue of how how to release the shroud to access the front element of the lens. BTW the pamphlet was issued long before my lens was manufactured.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    I would be quite surprised if this problem couldn't be solved. Any lens which is constructed can be deconstructed. The manufacturer hasn't made these lenses for a number of years...mine is dated 1980.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Please read the issue - this isn't about removing the lens from the camera or lens cap...it is about removing the front element from the lens.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    The lens hasn't been made since the late 1980's and the manufacturer no longer works on these lenses nor has parts for them. I can't believe nobody can answer this question of how to remove the shroud to get to the front lens element for cleaning. C'mon guys...somebody must have worked on one...they aren't uncommon even in this digital age.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Sorry, but that answer is inaccurate. There are not hermetically sealed elements in this lens. As I said, I was quite easily able to remove the rear elements last night, clean them and inspect the rear of the diaphragm blades. The issue is getting to the rear side of the first front element.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    I got an exceptional price from an estate sale. Anyway, had I bought it from a store, asking them how to repair it would have been like asking a used car salesman how to fix a valve train problem...salesmen aren't repair technicians in most cases.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Thanks. Yes that is a picture of my lens, correct model, etc. I have used mir.com as a reference source for a number of years. However I paid to have expert advice specifically on how to fix the lens on this site.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Thanks for suggesting the silica gel. The lens has sat in very low humidity for several weeks, it definitely appears to be haze rather than condensation, which is why I need to remove the shroud and get to the rear of the lens.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    I already have the user manual your link refers to, it does not address repairs or removal of the front element.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Thanks for the thought. The issue is I haven't been able to get to the retaining ring on the lens, as the shroud at the front of the lens needs to be removed first. Prior recommenders apparently are unfamiliar with this lens' configuration (with 1 exception), but he didn't have any specific recommendations on how to remove the shroud.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Sorry, but in order to repair the lens, the shroud must be removed. Every well designed lens in the last 100 years has been designed to produce specific results as well as be repaired. This lens isn't a toss-away low end consumer lens, but a special purpose rather complex lens assembly (although the lens elements by today's standard are less complex) which is designed to produce a flat field with high resolution and contrast, focusing from infinity to 1:1. It definitely was intended to be repaired.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    That was very interesting, but my intention is not to remove the diaphragm blades, but to merely remove the first element of the lens from the front for cleaning. Are you saying that the helicoid must be removed from the focusing barrel through the back of the lens housing to access the front element? That would be highly unusual. Most front lenses are readily accessible from the front, and rear lenses from the rear. The Canon lens repair manual (which preceedes the production of my lens by 8 years) shows frontal access on other 50mm lens elements. The design of this lens is different in that it has no visible means of holding the shroud in place. BTW, the link in your message turned up spam for a Mexican drug pharmacy.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Abhisheck33 - not related to my problem.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Hokuwho understood the problem but thought it wasn't worth spending the time to fix. Since the time is mine and I paid for expert advice in how to remove the front element of this lens, I will continue to seek answers until one provides clear instructions appropriate to this lens...up to this point, I've never had one I couldn't figure out, look up, or get pretty quick corect technical advice on. So keep them coming.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Thanks, but as I already indicated, I own and use the Canon Lens repair manual...but it was published before my lens was designed, and it's predecessor version isn't in the manual either. It is easy to look up the diagrams on the situating of the lens elements within their groups, but there doesn't appear to be a ready source for removal of the shroud which allows access to the first element's retaining ring.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    ac dr - if you are talking about the shroud, see my earlier comments. It rotates freely about the central axis when I press my fingers against the interior surfaces, but neither moves forwards nor backwards...there is something holding it in place. I thought it might need to be pulled forward while being rotated, perhaps to catch a thread, and then unscrewed, but since it doesn't move forward at all, that doesn't seem to be a possibility.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Thanks Niraj, but those links aren't relevant to the problem I'm seeking help for.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Sorry - you missed the whole point...this is not about removing a lens from the camera, it is about removing a shroud to remove the frontmost lens element. Thanx for trying.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Blueextc3221 - the Oleson link works now (unfortunately the lens featured doesn't have a front even vaguely similar to mine, or I wouldn't have needed to post in the first place, as I've worked on those). The new links, unfortunately refer to lenses of radically different physical construction from mine, the EF series were developed long after mine and basically share nothing in common except the Canon name. One of the new links provided brought me to a Nationwide Insurance ad. Thanks for trying.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    That's interesting information, but it has nothing to do with the issue I'm seeking an answer for. Thanks for trying, however.

  • scl8 Jan 12, 2009

    Somebody already recommended that link...that lens was manufactured much later than mine and the only similarities are the Canon name. Mine is an nFD (new FD mount), which is for a manual focus lens...not an electronic focus lens (EF), the design and construction of which are radically different.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    squidget23 - there is nothing on the front of the lens, including a filter ring, holding the shroud in place on this version of the lens. Additionally, as I mentioned earlier, the frontal surface of the shroud has no tabs, slots or holes for a spanner, nor screw holes. The shroud rotates freely when I place my fingers inside the funnel shape, but neither moves forward nor backward. Your father having the same camera is interesting, as I never mentioned what camera I have. This is merely a lens we are talking about, not a camera. Thanks anyway.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    Thanx - I'll rerun my trojan & adware scans...don't get too many as I'm running on Linux.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    Hello hi99ins - do you know that the whole assembly has to be removed from the rear from personal experience with this lens or can you cite a specific reference, as that approach is not very common for this specific manufacturer at the time the lens was made, especially for such a small front element. If your answer is "yes" on personal experience or you have a valid cite, I'll call it quits.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    I apologize if it sounded sarcastic, it is just that so many of the replies have been either filled with erroneous information, references to the wrong lens, speculation, or not related to the problem...and a slip like yours, in that context, suggested perhaps you hadn't read the issue, or at least opened you up to a credibility issue. No offense intended, hopefully none taken.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    Ser71 - fascinating information for opening the diaphragm, but it doesn't relate to my problem of accessing the rear side of the frontmost element.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    Thanks, I know how to clean it....the problem is opening it.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    CRTN -http://tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:B2nG... . This image is the front of my lens. A previous expert identified it as well, but didn't propose a solution.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    hi99ins - I extended the focus mechanism to its full macro position and examined the helicoids and the tracks the mechanisms they run on...it is quite a job to remove the whole assembly. The fact that the front shroud rotates freely while sitting about 0.5mm off the surface of the front lens element, and has a lip around the front perimeter suggests to me that it can be removed from the front, but there doesn't seem a way to grip or extract it. It feels like some sort of snap clip inside the barrel but I don't know. The screws you mentioned on the rear of this lens appear to be for disassembly of the diaphragm linkage mechanism...rather than the usual camera mount removal. Thanks for getting back at me...I think I'll see if anybody has specific experience with this lens.

  • scl8 Jan 13, 2009

    Postage would be outrageous as I'm located in the USA. There are several FD repair shops scattered around the country, but, as you know, I'm trying to do this simple lens cleaning myself if I can just get that shroud removed to get to the lens retainer ring.

  • scl8 Jan 14, 2009

    Thanks, I have a lens manual. I am seeking specific repair info.

  • scl8 Jan 14, 2009

    Thanks for the thought - but not related.

  • scl8 Jan 14, 2009

    Not related to the issue

  • scl8 Jan 14, 2009

    Thanks Worldvet - I was hoping in the vast array of fix-it-uppers somebody had the the specific experience to provide a solution which would allow me to fix this lens as I have many others.

  • scl8 Jan 14, 2009

    Thanks Jan - I even peeled the grip off the focusing ring to see if there were hidden screws underneath (as in some other lenses I've cleaned), but alas, none. The shroud ("lens hood") looks like its base rests about 0.5mm off the front of the first lens element, and like its top is resting on a ledge (think of a funnel resting set in a hole) the inner edge of which is below it in the filter holder. The shroud freely rotates in circular motion clockwise and counterclockwise, but can't move down because of the lip and doesn't move up and outward even when I apply upward and rotational pressure in either direction. I thought there might be some hidden threads it would catch on when rotated and forced toward the front and then merely unscrew past the filter threads but that doesn't seem to be
    the case.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    Thanks - as I said before, I have the Canon Lens Repair Guide, which was published well before the introduction of this lens. The link you supplied to mir.com will give a description of the lens generally, the arrangement of the elements/groups, and an exterior photo but no repair info...I've used this site for years as well as www.Kyphoto repair site and others. This particular lens has a shroud/built in shade which needs to be removed to get to the front element...I am seeking info on how to remove that shroud so I can get to the retaining ring which holds the front element in place. Everybody has tried to be helpful, but without specific experience with this lens, everybody is just guessing, as am I. So, if anybody has specific experience please stand up and be heard.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    Thanks - the rear side of the front element does need cleaning, a task I have done with many other lenses over the years. If there is a way to remove the shroud to gain access to the lens retaining ring, I will do it myself, as I am experienced in this activity. The issue is removing the shroud.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    Ginko - I have the service manual that diagram came from. However this lens front is constructed differently....there is no front ring to remove...please see the attached pictures one or two posts ahead of yours and descriptions of the shroud construction. The front lip of the shroud is where your diagram shows screws...there aren't any screws...the shroud rotates freely as many turns as you want both clockwise and counterslockwise.This lens was manufactured about 7-8 years after that guide was issued...it is an entirely different construction and different frontal configuration. The one you show is a piece of cake - I've done that kind at least 15 times.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    My issue has nothing to do with trying to open the diaphragm. I appreciate your trying to help...but if you read the ongoing comments you will see it deals with removal of an internal shroud to reduce reflections to the first element of the front lens group.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    Oh Wow - not even close, but thanks for continuing to try to come up with a solution. I think the solution will be dependent on somebody who has actually worked on this type of lens and knows the trick of removing the shroud.

  • scl8 Jan 15, 2009

    The lens has been stored in a dry environment, so I don't think moisture is the issue, but rather the haze may be an outgassing from lubricants, or smoke which could easily get inside the lens housing behind the elements through the open draw at the rear of the lens when extended in the macro position; it cleaned right off the interior of the rear elements with no problem. The front of the front element and rear of the rear element had obviously been carefully cleaned before I bought it at the estate sale.

  • scl8 Jan 16, 2009

    Smot_poker - interesting thought...there aren't dealers in my area who are both familiar with the nuances of nFD macro lenses (they were discontinued a number of years ago) & who are experienced repairpersons. Maybe 35 years ago, but not now. I am taking it to Photorama this weekend, weather permitting, as there are usually some experienced repairpeople who come in to tout their services.

  • scl8 Jan 16, 2009

    Junoon007 - The lens haze does have an effect on the contrast...I also have an earlier version of this lens in breech lock mount (so the exterior construction front and rear is different, although the optics are the same) and there is a definite difference in contrast in spite of the same optical construction. As far as filters go, that is a very different subject - but yes inappropriately using one or using a damaged one can introduce flare. Edge separation isn't an issue, the first frontal element is a single lens, the 2nd group consists of 2 cemented lenses, etc...etc. It is the first element I am trying to get to for cleaning.

  • scl8 Jan 16, 2009

    I already cleaned the rear element...piece of cake. I can't get to the front element due to the shroud. I'm guessing it removes similar to the rear, but the shroud effectively hides even the lens retainer ring.

  • scl8 Jan 16, 2009

    On the off chance it might do the job I tried it, but it had no effect on the haze -which looks more like a thin layer of smoke than moisture condensation.

  • scl8 Jan 16, 2009

    Vegakitten - the link didn't work. The camera type is irrelevant, as the lens mounts on any Canon which accepts FD mounts (before the days of autofocus, DSLRs, etc).

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    Muggs01 - I don't think it is a sealed lens, as that type of construction is inconsistent with Canon's mfg. processes for consumer lenses at the time of manufacture. Further, the rear two groups (3 elements) are easily removed for cleaning.

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    Rebelyes1 - no, that has been discussed several times earlier...this lens doesn't have those features making access easy...see earlier descriptions of how this lens differs from the one you found a picture of.

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    Wiz - sorry, but you're way off base. Canon stopped repairing FD lenses over a decade ago...only independents still repair them. 2nd - you're mistaken about it being a sealed system...you're thinking of another lens. I've already had the back end apart for cleaning...that's the way lenses were made in the 1970s & 80s.

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    Crafty_Maria - Yes, I'm sure you're right, either clips or a screwed in lens retaining ring. The problem is removing the shroud to get to the lens so that the clips or retaining ring can be removed. If you know how to remove this shroud, please let me know...FYI it is not like the ones you will find in the Canon Lens Repair Manual, as that was written approx. 8-9 years before my lens was introduced. nor is it like the pictures on Oleson's site. There are several photos others have turned up which have links to them. If you are familiar with this particular lens, please get back to me.

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    Calvinreub87 - another poster suggested the hair dryer trick, but it had no effect; the lens has been stored in very low humidity for some time. I believe the lens was indeed meant to be serviced, as every single other FD lens manufactured by Canon was serviceable, AND, it was quite easy for me to service the lenses (3) grouped to the rear of the diaphragm.

  • scl8 Jan 17, 2009

    fixer1950 - do you have an authoritative source to cite, a lot of people have been speculating but nobody has either had experience with this lens, nor been able to cite an authoritative source for their speculations. BTW, if the lens unit was hermetically sealed (which it wasn't and isn't) it would be unserviceable except in a chamber, such as the ones used by Focal Point when they redo lenses. There is free access to the rear elements, as I have stated numerous times, as well as the rear of the diaphragm blades...so there goes the hermetically sealed hypothesis.

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48 Answers

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If the built in lens hood has a rubber grip ring at its base, it is possible that the ring conceals access holes for grub screws that lock the ID ring in place. The ID ring is obviously the hood retainer as well as filter mount. Even if no rubber ring, the disassembly instructions may have you removing the whole front section so that hood goes rearwards - revealing grub screws. If the ID ring seems reluctant to move do not force it, Look for one or more lock screws.

Posted on Jan 14, 2009

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Hi scl8
This link below seems to be helpfull but you need some special tools to try this work .
http://www.f20c.com/stuff/canon/partslist/EF%2050%201.8%20II.PDF
good luck.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • 685 Answers

What kind of camera is it?

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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Friend, You've exhausted all the information you are going to receive here.

You need to make, fashion or obtain the ring wrench needed to unscrew your lens or bite the bullet and have a camera clinic do the work for you. That's about it . There are no tricks, tips or shortcuts left to offer.

Sorry about that, use the accumulated advice or have it fixed professionally. I know these lenses are worth the cash to repair compared to replacing them as a SLR film camera buff with a really nice Nikon rig and Darkroom myself.

That's about the extent of it, you've exhausted everything here for advice.

Regards and good luck,
Worldvet

Posted on Jan 14, 2009

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The plastic sunshade is fixed as a snap-in construction. So you have to lift it with some power to access the lens from the front. There are three plastic snappers holding it in a rim of the metall barrel. If you can make a ring of thin metal and push it inside the gap you can release those snappers and pull the sunshade out with no risk of breaking it. I managed it with a knife and gentle lifting to pull it out. The older version of the macro lens was better, there you could shrew it out. This snapping one is a real cheap solution.So this solution comes a little late - but maybe someone will be happy with it either. There is no need to disassemble everything to access the front lenses for cleaning.

Posted on Jul 27, 2012

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  • 38 Answers

I agree with the other people who posted that this is not a system that was ment to be taken apart. However, if you do get it apart, you may consider that you may not have the proper tools to put it back together again with the lens calibrated right. However - You may consider that if the moisture got in somehow, you may get it back out by heating it, maybe try placing it in an oven at the loswest tempeture you can for maybe 10 minutes or so.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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There are just some small lock clips holding the rim with the lens on the cylinder usually. You just have to carefully pry it to remove so you can clean lens and remove or wipe away any dirt or moist that is on it.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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Here's a blow-up of your lens, let me know if this is what your after...

http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-161.html

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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  • 71 Answers

Thats probably a sealed lens and you may need to go to a canon repair depot to get it fixed

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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  • 66 Answers

I had one do that, And i got a blow dryer to it for a little bit.It worked on mine. Condensation what can get in there.

Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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Let me quote you.
I think the solution will be dependent on somebody who has actually worked on this type of lens and knows the trick of removing the shroud.
Sounds like you need to take it to a dealer and have them show you in person. You can then tell everyone here how to fix this problem once you get it done yourself.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

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If it is that difficult to remove then it should be done at the shop, so that you do not do any damage that cant be fixed and have to throw the whole thing away, if the haze is suspected moisture in the camera, then get a bucket of Damp rid, it is a dessicant that will draw moisture out of anything, put it in an airtight container and let sit until the moisture is gone. can be time consuming but it is a simple fix without having to expose the insides of your camera to the outside elements, especially dust.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

  • Christopher Lipscomb
    Christopher Lipscomb Jan 15, 2009

    If it is that difficult to remove then it should be done at the shop, so that you do not do any damage that cant be fixed and have to throw the whole thing away, if the haze is suspected moisture in the camera, then get a bucket of Damp rid, it is a dessicant that will draw moisture out of anything, put it in an airtight container and let sit until the moisture is gone. can be time consuming but it is a simple fix without having to expose the insides of your camera to the outside elements, especially dust.

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From the Looks of it your camera requires cleaning. You are right about that. Hoqwever trying to play around wit the lens is not at all a good idea. These lenses are extremely delicate and you may end up losing it altogether. The best thing will be to give it for proffessional cleaning. It shouldn't cost you much. About 20-30$ is the usual price.
I dont expect to get paid for this but I am just trying to save you some money here.

Sai.

Posted on Jan 15, 2009

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Hi You have not mentioned which camera you have i guess it be a Canon Canonflex RM
You could remove the front element of the standard 50mm f1.8 lens and screw on one of three other lenses produced by Canon: a 35mm f3.5, a 95mm f3.5 and a 125mm f3.5. Only the EX-Auto and the prior EX-EE used these lenses.

Posted on Jan 14, 2009

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Here's a manual for your lens

i hope this helps!!!!

http://www.canonfd.com/50macrolens/canonmacrolensfd50mm.pdf

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

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Is There Anyway I Can Get You To Try And Find An Exact Picture Of Your Lens Via Google images? I Searched It Here

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • Michael Fisher
    Michael Fisher Jan 13, 2009

    This Isn't At All Helpful? Click Here
    Just A Shoot In The Dark


  • Michael Fisher
    Michael Fisher Jan 13, 2009

    Oh Yeah But You Need To Know About The Shroud. Sorry

  • Michael Fisher
    Michael Fisher Jan 13, 2009

    Here Is Just Some Info Maybe It Will Better Determine Some Things.
    I'm Sorry If I'm Way Off This Is Far From The Stuff Of Today.


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After opening u can clean it by industrial sprit i would help u out

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • nematics
    nematics Jan 13, 2009

    still it complicated u can get serviced by a cheap in Clay Cross

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The two rectangular pins are safety locks that depress when the lens is mounted on the camera. So take a pencil or some pointed sharp object and press down on those two rectangular safety lock pins and at the same time turn the inside area of the lens in the direction of the arrows (clock wise). Try the pin closest to the red dot first and try to turn will pressing the pin. it should slightly shift then push the other pin while turning and that should unlock it. Then turn it all the way and the lens should be wide open and the lens locking pin (the one you push to remove the lens should have popped up. To turn it back push the pocking pin on the side of the lens barrel (the one you use push when you mount and unmount the lens) and turn it back counter clock wise till it clicks in place.

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • Sergio Scalfaro
    Sergio Scalfaro Jan 13, 2009

    The two rectangular pins are safety locks that
    depress when the lens is mounted on the camera. So take a pencil or
    some pointed sharp object and press down on those two rectangular
    safety lock pins and at the same time turn the inside area of the lens
    in the direction of the arrows (clock wise). Try the pin closest to the
    red dot first and try to turn will pressing the pin. it should slightly
    shift then push the other pin while turning and that should unlock it.
    Then turn it all the way and the lens should be wide open and the lens
    locking pin (the one you push to remove the lens should have popped up.
    To turn it back push the pocking pin on the side of the lens barrel
    (the one you use push when you mount and unmount the lens) and turn it
    back counter clock wise till it clicks in place.

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The lenses are fitted from the back to the front. To remove the front lens, the contact assembly ( the bit that screws onto the camera body) is removed via a couple of small screwws
The rest of the lens dissembles from the back and is not really a home service item. You need a full service manual to do the job properly.
I am a mechanic and I wouldn't take one apart...

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

  • Tim Higgins
    Tim Higgins Jan 13, 2009

    I appreciate your comment - If there are screws on the contact assembly I think that it was assembled from the rear. I haven't specific experience of this lens and I should have mentioned that, but that assembly method seems to be fairly standard on many lenses.

    I made the mistake of trying to fix my Minolta SRT101 SLR and experienced mechanisms that were very hard to reassemble ( I messed it up and a camera place fixed it..:(



    so I just didnt want you to have the same (painful) experience, I dismantle engines and they are complex enough lol! I dont expect a fixya response just bein helpful...

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My dad has the same camera.

How it works is, there are two tiny tabs on both sides of the cap. The cap MIGHT be attached by a filter screw.

Turn the clock counterclockwise until it stops and then pull it out.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • Mandee Jan 13, 2009

    I meant lens, not camera. No need for sarcasm :) Hope you figure it out.

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Please look at page 35 of this pdf file I do believe this is a FD camera. It should help you.
http://www.canonfd.com/pdf/f1.pdf

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Just move n anti clok direction then open lense.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • kishor khatri
    kishor khatri Jan 21, 2009

    ther eis 1 lock unlokcit then pull the lense

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I am not a camera "repairperson" but I have found a site that sells lens repair manuals . .here it is

I understand that you have already "paid" for help .. but apparently the help all of my colleagues have given just hasn't quite taken care of the problem.

We are only here to try and help .. And ALL of us are doing that ..

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Sir, you need a REAL EXPERT to answer your question.
Contact this fellow:
http://www.fixya.com/users/hokuwho

He will give you a genuine answer.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Hi friend see this i hope its will be helpful for u
http://www.ejarm.com/photo/ef5018iidis/

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • sandip panchal
    sandip panchal Jan 12, 2009

    or try to move it anti clcok wise

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Hi talked about this before : when i decided to have a mini35 adapter i chose nikon lenses. a 50mm 1,4 and a 28mm 2,8 to be precise.
i also have a really nice TOKINA ATX 35-200mm f/3,5-4,5 but it's a canon FD mount.... my brain start to work (for the first time ever) and i had this idea : 
the focal flange of the canon fd is shorter than the nikon, so i just have to build an adapter to reduce the focal flange ... yeah that's stupid but i was persuaded that playing with the rings will allow me to reach a solution.
and this is what i've done :

1. put away my nikon 50mm + the nikon to canon eos adapter
2. put away the bayonet ring
3. put the canon fd mount with the adapter i've made.
4/5. the adapter is made of a rear canon FD lens cap(i made the hole) and a macro extension tube number 1 ( i had one left) and sort of glue the two (the screws are a temporary solution)
6. i screw the adapter on the canon FD lens.
7. this how it looks. this is really rigid. 

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • 3 more comments 
  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Jan 12, 2009

    check this 

  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Jan 12, 2009

    sorry i posted for Canon EF180mm f/3.5L USMMACRO ...

    You can get the aperture of a Canon FD lens to open and close, but there's a bit of a knack in doing it 8-)


  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Jan 12, 2009

    here it is



  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Jan 12, 2009

    1.depress the small sprungpin(a) to release thesilver breachlock ring,and rotate the ring clockwise(c)
    2.push the lever(b) counter clockwiseuntil it locks.you should now be able to see the iris diaphram open and close correctly as you change the appature/f-stop by rotating the apeture ring on lense


  • ABHISHEK.C
    ABHISHEK.C Jan 12, 2009

    if it fail do that try this

    FIG 2:
    2.depress the two thin pins(arrowed A and B)at the same time and rotate the inner part of the body in clockwise direction
    3.push the chrome lever (c) counter clockwise and use tape to hold it there.you should now see the iris and close as you rotate the apeture ring on the lense.
    4.to return the lense to normal state depress the bayone release button(f) and rotate the inner part of the lense body counter clockwise pushing on the lug (e)



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There are two versions of the FD 50mm f/1.8 SC lens: Version 1: Introduced in March 1973. The letter in the code on the back of the lens should be an N, O or P. There should be a small lever on the back of the lens that points to a red "L" or a white dot. The diaphragm should have six blades. Version 2: Introduced in March 1976. The letter in the code on the back of the lens should be a Q or a letter after Q in the alphabet. There should be no small lever, nor a red "L" or white dot, on the back of the lens. The diaphragm should only have five blades. I have repaired an oily diaphragm on a version 2 lens. Its construction is very similar to the FD 50mm f/1.4 SSC drawings on Rick Oleson's web site. The diaphragm can be removed from the front without the need to disassemble the focusing helicoid. However, I disassembled the helicoid. I couldn't get the lens back together because you can't mate the aperture levers properly from the front of the lens. I put the lens aside for a while in frustration. Recently, I revisited Rick's drawings and figured out how to reassemble the lens by removing the back of the lens which allows you to properly mate the aperture levers. Be aware that there are several small ball bearings, springs and the AE switch pin that can fall out and easily be lost. You need to work very carefully. If it wasn't for a large magnet, I would have lost some of these small items. After repairing a version 2 lens, I took a look at a version 1 lens with a bad diaphragm. This lens appears to be a little more complicated. From a cursory examination, it looks like the diaphragm can't be removed without disassembling the helicoid. I don't think it will be a problem to repair this lens, but I decided to put it aside until I'm in the proper frame of mind. If you decide to try your own repairs, I suggest you make notes as you go along. Note the orientation of the lens barrels when the focusing helicoid comes apart, as well as the orientation of the various moving parts.

This link is for the 1.4, however, both should disassemble similarly.
Good Luck!
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-161.html

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • 2 more comments 
  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 12, 2009

    i just clicked the link, and it took me to the correct page.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 12, 2009

    THIS LINK will provide you with the latter lense disassembly pics of the EF 50 1.8 II Lens.

    THIS LINK will provide you with the lense's part list/schematic blowup in PDF format that you can prit.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 13, 2009

    seems you have a virus or trojan on your PC. I have tried the links directly from the page on 3 seperate PCs.

    Adware run rampant.

  • blueextc3221
    blueextc3221 Jan 14, 2009

    Contaced a colleague, and he indicated Canon did not produce a manual for individual lenses in the nFD range. There is a parts list complete with exploded diagram for each lens. Then there are service notes for the various ranges of lenses, ie - wideangles, standard lenses, short teles, long teles and the zooms are split into three ranges depending on zoom ratio.



    He also stated that if you read the complete nFD lens repair manual, it becomes apparent that setting up the lens to give accurate exposures with the AE system is very critical. So while repairs may be done, but very rarely docan you get the original factory AE limits back.



    You need to get ahold of someone with a nFD Repair Manual (rare, and OOP)... or, as you stated - the needle in the haystack (hands on - successful experience disassembling of the nFD 50mm) that happens to be a FixYa Expert.



    Sometimes they can be found on eBay like this one (click to visit).... However they will denote the FDn Lense







    I am sorry that we cannot help you further, but without actually seeing what you are doing, we cannot tell what you are doing wrong - if anything.



    P.S. He said the proper nomenclature is FDn - (it may help in further research)



    Do some snooping around HERE and you may find more help.

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I dont think its meant to come apart,,you might check your local camera shop but i dont think it comes off

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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  • 58 Answers

I dont think removing the lens is the solution to this problem.  The haze behind the lens is most likely condensation.  I would place the lens assembly in my food dehydrator for a few hours at the lowest temperature for an hour and see if that solves the problem.    You could also put the lens assembly into a woven nylon bag (panty hose or stockings) then place every thing into a box and fill the box with silica gel ( dessicant ).  You can buy silica gel from a florist supply or at craft stores.  It is used to make dried flowers from fresh.     This is a  safer and more gentle solution.  I hope this suggestion works for you.   Best Wishes  Michael Mittelsdorf

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Click link below. They know everything there is about FD lens. Hope that helps.

http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/messageboard/lenses/index.php

Also there main pages have tons of info.

Is this what your lens looks like?

Haze behind front lens of Canon FD 50mm Macro lens - moz-screenshot.jpgfa6cd59.jpg

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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The lens element is not cemented. It's a single in the middle group of 3 elements, and the smallest in the lens. As it's a different composition to the others, I've assumed it's the SD element. I managed to easily clean other elements, but not this one.

stingOM, your lens almost looks like a bit of spotty fungus, along with haze in the last shot.
have had good success with the Lens-Pen type cleaners, followed by a wipe with a Carl Zeiss lens tissue. I've even had this treatment remove a mild case of fungus,

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jan 12, 2009

    ple contect tect service center is best
    Most
    front elements come out by removing the nameplate first and then the
    retaining ring, On others you can just remove the retaininging. If
    possible use a rubber crutch-tip of the proper size. It may leave
    behind a mess of rubber bits, but reduces the risk of scratching the
    lens. A spanner will then be needed to remove the retaining ring.



    use masking tape to protect the glass near the spanner slots from scratching.



    If it's just the front element, it fairly easy to fix. It can be a nightmare if it goes farther into the lens.



    The most difficult part is re-assembly without a lot of dust.



  • mohammed marika thambi
    mohammed marika thambi Jan 15, 2009

    You can just unscrew the front and rear elements by turning them
    counter clockwise. This removes the lens groups ,and I would suspect
    that its the back of the front element, and the front of the back
    element where the dirt is. The different groups of elements are
    cemented together and dirt can't get between them. To put the front and
    back elements back you just screw them back clockwise. If the back
    element can come out of its metal holder ,be sure and remember to put
    it back the same way it came out, one side might be concave. Good luck

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Hi welcome to fixya did you try taking it back to the store where you bought it so that they can show you how to do it in person

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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If you are able to open it, you will destroy it. There are gasses inside the lenses which prevent moisture. You should take it to a camera shop to be rebuilt.

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

  • David Shaub Jan 17, 2009

    The ring is pressed in and not intended to be removed.

  • David Shaub Jan 18, 2009

    I didn't say hermetically sealed, I said pressed in as in pressed fit, as in snap fit. The only way to remove it is to destroy it and replace it with a new one. There are a lot of parts that are snap fit that can't be reused. Electronics & optics companies are good at this.

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I have searched the web and found that this has to be replaced by the manufacture. 

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

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Welcome to Fixya! After Further Digging on this Subject, The Solid answer that I have found in other Places is That that Lens is Non Servicable. And will have to be Replaced by the Manufacturer. Wish there was an Easier Way to fix it.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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  • 199 Answers

Http://www.canonfd.com/1971lensinstructions/1971lenses.pdf
click the link and check out the instructions

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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Remove the lens assembly as others have already given instructions on how to do that. Once that is done check the diaphragm blades on the lens to make sure they are clean. Which could be causing your haze problem. to remove the front part of the lens

use a rubber pad wrench to remove the rubber ring

Then there will be four screws behind that you will need to remove

Remove the diaphragm assembly and you should be able to get out the front part of the lens.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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I dont know why you would want to dismantle the lens to clean. Are you sure the problem is inside the lens and not outside? Neways, You can normally dismantle by removing small screws on the lens mount surface or on the sides. These screws might be hiding inside small holes.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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Dear Sir/Madam,

Click this link to solve the problem

Link 2

Link 3


Thanks
Good Luck

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

  • Asfiya Ahamed
    Asfiya Ahamed Jan 15, 2009

    Sir,

    These are generally the best bargain lenses around.
    Often times you will get a lens with cleaning marks or with edge separation
    for literally pennies on the dollar. I once bought a Goerz Dagor lens for
    5 dollars because it had quite a few cleaning marks on the front element
    and there was some separation on some other elements. I shot the lens for
    years before I sold it, and I still have pictures that are sharper from
    that lens than from a much better looking Schneider Xenar lens.

    Edge separation is just that: edge separation.
    Most of the picture taking, especially in medium and large format photography,
    is done at f/16 to f/32 for maximum depth of field and increased sharpness.
    Such small apertures mean that only a small portion of the center of the
    lens is used to actually let light through. Where does the separated edge
    come into play in such a case? Nowhere! Of course, a lens with edge separation
    may be more prone to separate further, but most of them do not. If the
    separation becomes so serious that even shooting at f/16 - f/22 is a problem,
    that the lens is unfortunately gone for good. In the many years that I
    have done photography I have not yet seen such a lens. The moral of the
    story is: buy even separated lenses if they are not too bad. Use the separation
    as a bargaining point and drive the price down.


    Cleaning marks come from a zealous lens owner
    who did not read my web page . These marks have the theoretical
    ability to scatter the light and create more flare than your lens was already
    prone to, as well as the less desired (except for portraits) effect of
    image softening. In reality, a lens would have to have a huge amount of
    cleaning marks before it degrades the image significantly. Most often there
    will be no noticeable loss of sharpness even at your widest opening. If
    the marks are large, deep or they are actual chips in the glass, you can
    fill them in with a black magic marker (Yes, that is right, I have not
    lost my marbles) and shoot away. The black ink will eliminate the light
    scattering possibility and will avoid flare. The lens will take care of
    everything else and often you will not be able to tell that a certain negative
    was shot with a lens exhibiting the defects outlined in this paragraph.



    geovisit();


    If this not solved ur problem better to contact manufacturer's

    Thanks
    Good Luck





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Your description would indicate somewhat messy DIY handywork - half a tube of contact adhesive to hold the name ring in!! As I have stated before; the official Canon repair 'notes' are really an 'aide memoir' for the technician, and as such can be somewhat sparse in detail. The one for this lens is very sparse indeed. I do not have this lens, but I think you will be able to work it out with the lens in front of you. What is not clear however, is if you remove the focus ring before the optical group. My guess is that this is a typical 50/1.8 construction, hence the optics come out before the focus ring is removed.

At whatever stage the focus ring is removed; you must rotate it to infinity and then scribe a datum onto the ring and the helicoid, before removing the three screws. In all the other wide angles, you can only see the helicoid when the optical group is removed. So I would think the procedure is as follows:-

Remove name ring.
Remove the three filter ring retaining screws and lift off ring.
Remove inner retaining plate.
Lift out optical cell/elements.
Remove focus ring as per above.

The optics seem to sit in a 'funnel' shaped baffle, which in the notes appears to just lift out. All the wide angle notes refer back to the 50/1.8 detailed repair notes when guidance is needed. So I do not think you will have much of a problem.

Your problem, will be removing the mess that has bonded in the inner retaining plate

Make sure your scribe datum lines on the iris assembly and inner helicoid - so you can replace in exactly the same location. If you do not, the f values will not be correct. Also only remove the iris assembly holding screws, and not the two that hold the iris housing front and back plates together...


Thanks.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 Jan 11, 2009

    uhmm thats the old version i believe u have....





    Read and follow :)





    First, I removed everything that has anything to do with FD mount. This was done by removing 3 screws (they can be reached by rotating the locking bring, between the bayonet cut-outs).
    For adaptor, I used one of M42-EOS adaptors (from ebay, ~$10.00) and machined it like shown on image, to be able to reach the focus of my 400D... the depth of cut was 1mm (still 1m left on adaptor, more than enough). Since this is still ~0.7mm out of focus, the focus stop had to be adjusted as well. To reach it, I had to remove (unscrew) the plastic ring with letters from the front of the lens, using a rubber tool that made good contact with the ring and yet no contact at all with the glass of the lens. Then there are two other rings to remove, before the focus stop was available...





    Thanks.

  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 Jan 15, 2009

    UPDATE THE FIRMWARE.



    Seriously - try not to push the lens to the end. When it reaches the end try rotating it backwards a little bit and see if it works. There's not much that could happen with EF 50/1.8 Mark II version. It doesn't have any screws on the mount....



    A NOTE - READ IT



    Just wondering, since I don't have a camera in front of me .. but still:
    Pentax lens for example, has a small *button* on the back which when pressed opens the aperture. Not sure if Canon is completely automatic, but if not could it be that post firmwire upgrade somehow the aperture ring got *locked* out. If your camera has DOF preview, try pressing/releasing this numerous times and then attempt releasing the lens. I know of 1 situation - this had helped, but not for Canon.
    finally, i would SERIOUSLY AND ADAMANTLY recommend you NOT TO give too much pressure on the whole thing. You have a $80.00 worth of lens attached right now to a +$800.00 worth of equipment. If push comes to shove you can hammer away the lens (break the thing) rather than break the camera mount! Take it to a service center but please - don't end up breaking a $800.00++ equipment for a $80.00 lens....





    THANKS.

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  • Cameras Master
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Here is the user manual follow instructions on manual here to remove the lens.

Removing the lens and drying the outer side may not fix the problem, often to fix this you have to take apart the lens assembly, in that case find a local repair shop, or call the service number listed on the owner manual.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

  • Ginko
    Ginko Jan 11, 2009

    You can get the disassembly procedure here.

    Remember to leave feedback afterward.

    thanks.


  • Ginko
    Ginko Jan 15, 2009

    I already told you how to disassemble the front end, once you take apart the first screws, the two shroud tabs will come out.

    Remove the outer ring holder using a rubber pad, then you find a set of three tiny screws.
    Remove the outer ring, and the curtain parts will come free.

    That at least is the way it works on similar models, I don't think yours is different.


    I post again the diagram below, the shroud is not pictured, it is located underneath the outer ring and the ring holder.




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To remove the lens, turn it counterclockwise,while pressing the lens releasing button,until it stops and pull it out.
*take care not to damage the pins and levers on its rear.always put this lens down with the rear facing up.
for further details download the manual from the given link below.

www.canonfd.com/50macrolens/canonmacrolensfd50mm.pdf

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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You can try using a filter wrench, cheap and readily available, they should be able to hold the front element mount steady whilst you turn the lens hood.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • John Thomas
    John Thomas Jan 23, 2009

    Just observe the camera carefully there must be some kind of locking system first try releasing it

  • John Thomas
    John Thomas Jan 23, 2009

    You can also look for some kind of child lock system

  • John Thomas
    John Thomas Jan 23, 2009

    May be there is some kind of system so that you can press inside which releases the lens

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It appears that your camera's len ses use a small retaining screw. You can get complete instructions and manual download here. Good luck.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

  • Dave Markley
    Dave Markley Jan 12, 2009

    I apologize for the bad link, I should have checked it first. Anyway, try this one - it works. Hope this helps.

  • Dave Markley
    Dave Markley Jan 12, 2009

    Sorry again, but that link isn't working either - found the problem. This one here should definately work..

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There is a small clip like screw locking which needs to be bit uplifted to open this assembly.handle with care or you may break it.

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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When removed from the camera involves pushing various pins and levers at the same time.

here is further step by step instructions that should make things alot easier for you.
http://www.canonfd.com/macrolens_vlad/50mm%20FD%20Macro.pdf

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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This is a sealed system and can NOT be taken apart!
I know this is not the norm for this company but it is a fact!

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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