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Zoom r8 microphone issue

I have tried a condenser and two dynamic mikes, but the silhouette hiss still prevails. the ZNR is effective at eliminating background hiss but does not get rid of the mentioned after hiss. I have tried reducing the treble frequency but this after a certain point destroys the clarity.I don't know whether this is an inherant fault or if there may be a solution.I would appreciate your comments.

Posted by Anonymous on

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 5603 Answers

SOURCE: Some Headphones have an inherent

Hiss is a problem of statistical noise in electronic devices due to the laws of physics plus circuit design.

One thing to do is to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by properly setting gains. It is POSSIBLE that the IEM's you are using are too low impedance for the receivers resulting in you having to use excessive gain at the receiver. Your receiver gain control should not have to be above 60% of the way up. If you are above that, the ear buds are probably lower impedance than the receiver is designed for... and remember the manufacturer will LIE on the capability of the thing they are trying to sell.

The receiver is speced at 32 ohm drive... IF your ear buds are less than that impedance, they are NOT suitable. Conversely if they are too high, thaat will ALSO cause you to turn up the receiver gain too much and result in poor SNR.

You want to make sure the transmitter is being driven at line level so receivers get adequate input audio so gain doesn't have to be run too high.

Posted on Jan 04, 2011

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SOURCE: I feel that the 'normal'

No, that will not help. The his is a function of the receiver NOT receiving a signal from the transmitter as they apparently do NOT have a "squelch" circuit to mute the receiver noise when no signal is being received. The noise level when no signal is received is pretty high and apparently the volume control is not enough to reduce the hiss.

To solve this, LEAVE the transmitter ON and make yourself a switch at the receiver. DO this using one of those little in line lamp switches that fit on zip cord. Make one on a short length of zip cor with mating connectors to fit the received jack and the headphone plug. Don't worry about unshielded wire as the impedance is very low. Then you use this switch to mute the headphones when you want to. There are other switch types you can use, I am just suggesting what might be readily available to you.

Sennheiser SHOULD have include a mute switch on their unit as turning the power off on the receiver would be a pain. They could have used a volume control with switch to kill the audio line out... simple solution... oversight on their part.

Posted on Mar 25, 2011

  • 28 Answers

SOURCE: i am using the SL

Your dynamic mics should be fine, phantom power provides one positive 48 volt potential to one side of the coil, and a negative 48 volt potential to the other side of the coil so your mics will effectively see 0 volts as these potentials will cancel each other out ( hence the name "phantom" power).
so provided that your microphones are wired properly internally, and your xlr leads are in good condition you will not damage any of your equipment.

I hope this has been helpful

Posted on Apr 03, 2011

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SOURCE: im using a behringer ucg102

Try this using a differeent computer. Some computers generate a lot of digital noise. Also use a lot of gain from the guitar to improve the signal to noise ratio.

Posted on Jul 24, 2011

mrwtech727
  • 75 Answers

SOURCE: My Behringer mixer Eurorack UB802

Here's the manual. page 8 Good Luck!




http://ec1.images-amazon.com/media/i3d/01/A/man-migrate/MANUAL000064843.pdf

Posted on Sep 03, 2011

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Your dynamic mics should be fine, phantom power provides one positive 48 volt potential to one side of the coil, and a negative 48 volt potential to the other side of the coil so your mics will effectively see 0 volts as these potentials will cancel each other out ( hence the name "phantom" power).
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However if the frequency is around 50hz (the G 2 1/2 octaves below middle C on a piano) it is most likely due mains electricity interference or an earth (grounding) issue.
Here are a few things to try to identify the source.
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Hi my zoom g1x fx is having some sound issues,it creates unpleasant noises and the sound kinda fades. I noticed the fading of the sound when i'm picking the thinner strings but it sounds so loud on the...


Hello I have this pedal too and have experienced similar problems..
If you are using battery power only use Duracell Ultra (or equivalent) never re-chargeable batteries. However I am assuming you are using the mains power adapter rather than batteries.
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