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A really bad 'off key' note

I have noticed on occasion a 'off key' note in the electric piano mode. Everything else seems to be fine. (think it may be the same key(s))

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What is make and model? I have owned several keyboards, with 2 of them Korgs in which I would connect a damper pedal. I noticed that when I help down the pedal, after so too much input within the cpu of the keyboard, it would 'short-circuit' and sound like I had played an 'off-key'

If you have been using the damper pedal, and even if you release a little on up on it, but not all the way, the 'off-keys' will still sound. I must always make sure the pedal is placed in a position that my leverage action of my foot will completely 'release' the overtones still being processed by the keyboard (whether they're audible or not)

Posted on Feb 26, 2009

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We bought this upright piano for our daughter to learn on but I can't seem to find any info on it. Serial number 23930. Any info would be fabulous. Thank you.


Remove the front of the piano. Remove the middle C key complete from it mounting pin. You may find the production date and its full service history written in pencil on the side of that key. A piano tuner told me this after I told him that I had removed all the keys to clean them and I was surprised to see the whole history. It said it was standard practice.

Here is some other information.

Concord Mission Style Upright Piano ' The Antique Piano ...

antiquepianoshop.com/product/192/concord-mission-style-upright-piano/ The Concord Piano Company was controlled and manufactured by the famous George P. Bent Piano Company of Chicago, and they built pianos for several ...

Concord ' The Antique Piano Shop

antiquepianoshop.com/online-museum/concord/ (SEE ALSO: CROWN, GEORGE P. BENT) The Concord Piano Company was ... and manufactured by the famous George P. Bent Piano Company of Chicago.

Upright Piano Value ' key-notes

www.key-notes.com/upright-piano-value.html Jun 16, 2014 - Question: I have a Concord upright cabinet grand piano, serial ... Albert's reply: Piano values are based on information such as manufacturer, ...

Piano Manufacturers in Illinois between 1842 and 1908

https://sweeneypiano.com/.../manufacturers/il_piano_manufacturers.cfm The names of Piano Manufacturers and the date year the company was established in the state of Illinois between 1789 and 1911. ... Company, Chicago. Foley & Williams Piano Manfacturing Company, Chicago ... Concord Company, Chicago.

Jan 19, 2016 | Musical Instruments

1 Answer

Key B2 playing to loud, not touch responsive


What is your piano brand and type?
Damage to the contact rubber can cause note plays loudly or,
note does not plays at all.
It is caused by:
1. Carbon rubber contacts dirty / dusty (yellow arrow). Clean with a pencil eraser (or cloth). Gently rub it.

key-b2-playing-loud-not-touch-wy0wtjmd43l3of51yru11dct-4-0.jpg

2.
Contact rubber is torn (your case). If this happen,it can not be repaired or glue. So, you have to replace one octave.
The yellow arrow indicates the side that is often torn.
key-b2-playing-loud-not-touch-wy0wtjmd43l3of51yru11dct-4-1.jpg

Rubber side that is torn, usually not seen, unless we move / pressing gently on top (In the rubber contact position is not installed on the board.)
Examples of this picture was yamaha psr.
key-b2-playing-loud-not-touch-wy0wtjmd43l3of51yru11dct-4-3.jpg
.

Oct 14, 2015 | Musical Instruments

1 Answer

QS8 keyboard. Why is volume in organ mode much louder than piano mode when I switch between modes without touching volume slide?


On organ mode, in general, almost all brands of the modern keyboard, velocity setting is not enabled. Setting velocity is used to determine how much the level of the sound that follows how strongly you press the keys. It is really just to imitate the sound of vintage organs, which in the past, electronic organ technologi not use the velocity on the keys. So, how strong / slow we press the keys, the sound level will remain the same.
At the Piano mode,modern keyboard using setting velocity. This also to imitate an acoustic piano, which, if we press the keys slowly, the sound level will be slow as well, and vice versa.
So, in your case,at the same volume slider, try to play on the organ modes, note level. Moving to the piano mode and press the keys securely powered (full power). Then the sound level should be equal to the organ mode.
On modern keyboards, also included organ sound that added velocity setting. Usually found on the user bank.

Sep 01, 2015 | Alesis Musical Instruments

1 Answer

Alesis QS8 keyboard. The volume of the organ is much louder than the keyboard when I switch between both modes without touching the volume slide. How can I fix this.


On organ mode, in general, almost all brands of the modern keyboard, velocity setting is not enabled. Setting velocity is used to determine how much the level of the sound that follows how strongly you press the keys. It is really just to imitate the sound of vintage organs, which in the past, electronic organ technologi not use the velocity on the keys. So, how strong / slow we press the keys, the sound level will remain the same.
At the Piano mode,modern keyboard using setting velocity. This also to imitate an acoustic piano, which, if we press the keys slowly, the sound level will be slow as well, and vice versa.
So, in your case,at the same volume slider, try to play on the organ modes, note level. Moving to the piano mode and press the keys securely powered (full power). Then the sound level should be equal to the organ mode.
On modern keyboards, also included organ sound that added velocity setting. Usually found on the user bank.

Sep 01, 2015 | Alesis Musical Instruments

1 Answer

My CVP-7 sounds a little off in some of the settings. Would replacing the motherboard help?


Possibly.
Depends what you mean by "off".
I know of an electric piano that sat in front of a window that leaked when it rained. Now the piano sounds like the vibrato is running at about 40 cps. It probably needs a new circuit board. But the owner doesn't notice it and he has no audience. "It sounds fine.", he tells me.
On the other hand, you may just have a lose part that physically vibrates inside somewhere when you play notes that resonate with it. It's hard to say without hearing it.

Feb 26, 2015 | Musical Instruments

1 Answer

I was given an upright piano made by Sturz bros of ny....the serial number is 7015...can you give me any info on it such as age, value, and any history on it at all?


Warning: Very long-winded reply approaching.

Sturz Brothers pianos were established in New York state in 1871, and seem to have the reputation as "[Sturz Brothers]...pianos and piano-players are distinctly high-grade instruments" (per http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/).
I can't find any information as to when they ended making them.
All of which is great, but:
Be aware when dealing with antique pianos:
Many of the old (say, 1850 to 1940) pianos were made by companies that are no longer in business (failed, or bought out
by a competitor), or companies that built the instrument under another name.

Pianos back then were not really mass-produced, they were hand crafted- and each manufacturer made their piano very
differently, so:
Short Version: there will be parts that will work on only that *one* model of piano, so getting parts will be difficult if not
impossible.

Long Version: Musical instrument craftsmen (craftspersons?) love to innovate, for a variety of reasons: they may find a
new way, for instance, to connect the key to the hammer that strikes the corresponding note. It might be a better way to
do it, or, more often, it was to come up with a cheaper way to do it.
The point I'm making is that your Struz Brothers piano will have parts that are totally different from, say, a piano made by
either Krakauer Brothers, Doll, Jacob & Sons, or Mathushek & Son Piano Company (companies that started around the
same time as Sturz Brothers). The parts may vary from one year to the next, or even one model to another.

So, if your Sturz Brothers piano needs a key replaced, or the harp has bent under pressure, the soundboard is cracked,
or any number of things that can plague an old instrument, you'll need to either
A) find someone that is willing to sell parts from a similar model (if they're parting it out, it has more problems than
yours does), OR
B) you'll need to have the part manufactured from scratch by craftsmen that specialize is rejuvenating old pianos. This
will be expensive far, far beyond what the piano is worth- and these craftsmen live very well, BTW...

Last Caveat: Upright models sell for much less (and the term "Upright Grand" was just an advertising phrase, there is
no such animal.) Uprights (spinets particularly) sound very... tinny, is the best description I can think of. Tinny like the
toy piano your granma gave you when you were five- remember, the black keys were painted on? Tinny like that.
So, unless the piano is a Steinway & Sons, a B?sendorfer, or a Fazioli, don't count on huge offers for your instrument.
And if it came to you from your great-aunt Tilly and you can't bear to part with it, that's great, I understand sentimental
value. Just know that this will cost a great deal to bring to playing condition.

I'm often told "But the keys all work, the pedals are still tight, and the tuner told me that it's not a bad piano!" All this is
true. But please remember that professional buyers know all of these potential pitfalls won't offer much, and the guy on
Craigslist that needs to replace the piano for Great-Aunt Tilly can't afford much.
Good luck!

Nov 22, 2014 | Musical Instruments

1 Answer

Yamaha Electronic Piano- certain notes malfunctioning


Either the first or second closure matrix line for the "A" keys is bad.

This may be a cracked or shorted circuit board.

A bank of diodes is used to prevent sneak electrical path if more than one octave has notes pressed.

First thing is to clean ALL the key contact areas and the conductive rubber pills with 99% isoprophyl alcohol.

This involves dis-assembly of the key area. If you are not competent in electronics, best left to a pro shop.

The keys are scanned in a matrix, two contacts per key and all the individual notes are in common (all the "A;s", "B's"...) And each octave is strobed for the first set of contacts and then for the second set of contacts. an the whole octave is read in parallel.

The reason for two contacts is one closes first and then the other as a key is lowered. The time between these is measured and is the note VELOCITY which for a piano controls the loadness of the note. IF ONE of the two fail, the loudness will vary as yours does.

Nov 24, 2009 | Yamaha NP 30 76 Key Lightweight Digital...

1 Answer

Fredy 2 I am trying to play chords with my fingers, there is no sound, if it is on any other mode the chords work but i need it to be on fingered mode thanks doreen


OK... It wasn't clear from the original.

Sometimes the keyboard has a mode that splits for upper and lower part of the keyboard, usually splitting at the F#/G. Also CERTAIN voices will ONLY sound one note at a time. Piano setting would not have this problem of course.

When you play a single note does that sound? If it doesn't in the fingered mode, then there may be a processor problem in the unit/

If it does, there is probably a problem in the matrix that scans the keyboard electrically. If one of the keys were ELECTRICALLY stuck on, the processor within could not read whole sections of the keyboard.

To troubleshoot the problem, press exactly one key at a time... do they all work for say a piano voice while in the fingered mode.

Next press a key at the high end of the keyboard and try others. See if you can find an octave that fails to work.

The problem is likely imbedded in the electronics and could be anything from a dirty key contact to a cracked circuit board. It is NOT likely you can fix this yourself unless you are experienced in electronics.

Sep 28, 2009 | Casio Musical Instruments

1 Answer

Roland 3000 Digital Piano 88-Key Full-size weighted keyboard


It's not really for the faint of heart, but generally this is caused by gunk getting into the key circutry. Underlying the 3000's keyboard is a silicone pad with 2 contacts on it, the measurement between each being hit is the issue usually but yours just sounds like there's something in there causing a physical or contact obstruction.

What you really want to do is to remove the keys and clean everything but this isn't easy... You could try using 99% alcohol (from a pharmacy) to clean inside it which may well help you.

There's a good thread on a similar issue at:

http://www.electronicspoint.com/roland-hp-3000s-digital-piano-dodgy-note-t18946.html

Which may help you work out how to do the disassembly if you are brave, but I would start with pouring some alcohol in and poking it and hoping for the best 1st. It sounds crude, but it works amazingly well with some things.

Dec 29, 2008 | Yamaha NP 30 76 Key Lightweight Digital...

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