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Won't record on Large tape

I have a 43 minute show that I try to assemble record on a large tape and recording wlll just stop somewhere along the way. No problem with small 30 minute stock.

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Re: Won't record on Large tape

Check the cassette housing - the flexible cable in the housing may break, resulting in problems with large tapes.

Posted on Jul 10, 2007

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I taped a TV show. But I can't fast forward to see the end part that I want to watch. It just advances to the end.

I'm not surprised that it advances on the end. The VCR doesn't know where the end of the taped programme is. You will have to search manually for it. Start at the end of the tape and rewind a few minutes worth of recording then press 'play' and see what you get. If not successful rewind further and try again, etc,etc. Alternatively you could press "play +rewind" which should allow you to watch the record on what is fast (=x2) rewind. It will help you if you know how long the show was and at what point the tape was when recording started.

Mar 26, 2015 | VCRs


How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems

A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | VCRs

1 Answer

VCR won't record, just ejects tape

You have not mentioned the make and model number of the vcr. Any way the problem is due to end sensor or related circuit. End sensors are photo diods which you can check the shorting with a multy meter.

Jan 13, 2013 | Emerson VCRs

1 Answer

VCR Model Panasonic NV-J45:- Until just yesterday, it worked fine, only last night I tried to play a tape, the green auto-tracking light flashed a few times as usual, then the tape just kept stopping, no...

The problem is caused by the idler assembly which controls play, record, rewind, and fast forward. If the take up reel stops, the vcr senses a problem and will stop the tape. The only other thing it can be is the drive belt, sometimes it will stretch and fall off or break. I suggest a tv technician or somebody that knows their way around a machine.

Jan 14, 2011 | Panasonic PV-9451 VHS VCR

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Recording instructions

well if the vcr is hooked up and you can watch a show on it put in a tape that has a movie on it then press play if you can see the show take out that tape put in your blank tape find the show on your tv u wish to record press record try this before the show comes on record a little bit of a show like 30 sec or so then rewind and play back to see if it did record if it did just repete this when the show that you want to record comes on hope this is helpfull....

May 30, 2010 | Panasonic AG-DV2000 Mini DV VCR

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Panasonic vcr super drive MOd NV-SD-400EA - looking for a 'felt' wheel that runs against the large recording spool inside the vcr - this appears to pick up excess tape residue to allow clear showing of...

To be honest they are not much good, if it's worn out forget about it. Instead get some Servisol Video 40 spray and clean the video head with that. You can get it from Maplin (UK) Radioshack (USA) or Electrical parts type shops. Even seen it on Amazon!

Dec 25, 2009 | VCRs

1 Answer

DSR 11 won't record DV tape to its end

You need to use longer tapes. The DER-11 is a DVCAM deck which when recording, uses a faster tape speed then mini DV. Think of your older VCR's. They had SP, two hours, and EP or SLP, which would be six hours. The SP speed would give a better picture. DVCAM is more like an SP recording except digital and a lot better. More information is laid down on the tape.

You'll have to jump up to the full size DVCAM tapes in order to record the full hour.

Apr 10, 2009 | Sony DSR-11 DV / Mini DV VCR

1 Answer

Can the Panasonic AG-DV2500 play 90 minutes Minidv tapes?

the DV2500 will not play LP (90 minute) tapes. when an LP tape is inserted, it will play for 2-3 seconds, and then eject.

Nov 28, 2008 | Panasonic AG-DV2500 DV/Mini DV VCR

1 Answer

Changing from sp to ep

it will automatically play at the speed the tape was recorded at. but if you want to change record speeds here's how: you should be able to access menu functions from the front of the vcr, if so, put a tape to be recorded into the unit and then set the timer for a couple of minutes.while you are on the timer menu it will ask you for recording speed. set the timer record speed to ep and let it record for two minutes and let it record for the full time untill it stops recording. the record speed will automatically change settings to whatever you used last on timer record.

May 01, 2008 | Sharp VC-A560U VHS VCR

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