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Dryer won't heat

Have replaced heating element and the thermostat mounted on the heater case. Am about to go replace the other thermostat which is mounted outside the blower.

This model ( Kenmore 11076930100, from 1987) has just those two thermostats and no fuses that I can find.

Can it be anything else but those three components (element & two thermostats) that would stop it from heating?

Dryer spins and blows just fine and main fuse box is fine.

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I know you said the fuse box is fine but check and see if you have 220 volts at the dryer cord we need to start there let me know what you find
bill

Posted on Jan 10, 2009

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Electric dryer getting way too hot


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3-5 ACCESS TO THE BLOWER WHEEL OR THERMOSTATS

To get to the blower wheel, remove the back of the dryer.

The blower wheel is under the bottom of the lint screen duct to your left, as you look at the back of the dryer.

The operating thermostats are at the blower wheel outlet.

In electric models, the hi-temperature cutout thermostat is mounted to the heat riser.

3-6 TEMPERATURE CONTROLS AND HI-TEMP SAFETIES

These clothes dryer machines use operating thermostats to control the temperature inside the drum, and hi-limit thermostats to prevent overheating of the dryer drum.. Many machines also have extra temperature controls, such as bias thermostats and heaters, hi-temperature cutoffs, and thermal fuses.

Bias thermostats are just like regular operating thermostats, except that they are mounted inside a bias heater. When the bias heater is energized, it generates a small amount of heat, which causes the operating thermostat to open sooner, keeping the dryer drum cooler inside. Thus a bias heater allows a single operating thermostat to act like both a hi-temp and a lo-temp operating thermostat.

A thermal fuse is found on the blower outlet, right next to the operating thermostat(s.) This fuse will blow when too high a temperature is sensed at the outlet; usually when one of the operating thermostats has failed. If it blows, the motor may not start, or you may get no heat (no voltage to the burner.)

A thermal cut-off is mounted on the clothes dryer heater box. It is a back-up for the hi-limit thermostat. Whenever you replace it, you should replace the hi-limit thermostat, too. A high-temperature condition causes it to open, an overheated grounded heat element may also cause it to open.

Dec 01, 2013 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Not getting hot


Hello there and welcome to fixya
There are many things that can cause a no heat symptom in an electric dryer, here is a list of possible causes in order of likelihood or ease of access.
  1. An open fuse/breaker in the house fuse panel. There are 2 fuses or breakers for the dryer, both must be good in order for the dryer to function properly. If one is open, it is possible for the dryer to run but not generate heat. In the case of breakers, try resetting them as sometimes one of the two can open but not physically tip the mechanical lever.
  • An open thermal fuse in the dryer. Some models use a thermal safety limiter or thermal fuse which could open the circuit to the heat element. These are used to prevent a runaway or over heat condition and are often found mounted to the blower or heater element housing (see the links below for examples). These devices are a fairly current development and may not be found on very old dryers.

    alertbubble.gif Note: If this is the cause of your current problem (pardon the pun), I strongly suggest you check the vent for obstructions and ensure its length meets the manufacturers recommended limitations, the shorted the better. Failure of this part could be the first indication of a potential fire hazard in the dryer!
  • The element coil is burnt out. Dryer elements are bare wires coiled like springs, when they fail the wire will break opening the circuit. This breakage could be intermittent, only opening as the element expands as it heats. Sometimes the element coil has to be physically checked for breakages, especially where the coil goes through ceramic insulator which could hide a breakage from plain view.
  • Depending on the brand and style, the replacement element may be just the coiled wire that has to be mounted into the original element housing. On other models the element assembly comes already mounted on a frame that then in installed into the element housing or directly into the dryer. Whichever the case, the element coil has to be replaced not just joined together using connectors.
    Open switches.These can include the heat selector switch mounted on the console panel, one of the thermostats (from 2 to 5 on some models) mounted in various locations of the internal dryer ducting, the motor switch or the heater contacts of the timer or a 'heater relay' on newer models with an electronic heat control mechanism.

    Aug 16, 2011 | Dryers

    1 Answer

    My kenmore dryer is blowing only cold air. What is wroge? We already checked the heating element and timer...???? This dryer is only 4 years old.


    The heating circuit is composed not only by the heating element and the timer but also with a high-limit thermostat, a thermal cut-off, and a cycling thermostat. The high-limit thermostat and the thermal cut-off are both mounted on the heater housing to monitor and regulate the heater temperature while the cycling thermostat is mounted on the blower housing to monitor and regulate the temperature of the exhaust air.

    All of these components are wired in series and a failure in any of them results in the dryer not heating. The proper troubleshooting is by checking the continuity of each of these components with a volt-ohmmeter and replacing the ones found without continuity (open).

    A continuity check can also be done by bypassing each of the three components, never the heating element, and then starting the dryer. The dryer should heat, otherwise the problem is somewhere in the timer, the heating element, or the centrifugal switch within the motor. When the dryer heats up, unplug it then un-bypass one of the bypassed components and start the dryer. If the dryer stops heating then you have found the failed component; replace it. If the dryer does not stop heating, do the same to the remaining components until you find the failed one. Just make sure the dryer is unplugged before touching the components.

    Replace both the high-limit thermostat and the thermal cut-off if any of them has failed. Indicate the exact model number of the dryer if you need further or more specific advice.

    Jun 12, 2010 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

    1 Answer

    Will run but will not heat up


    Most likely a bad heating element and or bad thrmostats. you'll need to check these by ohming out after removing the rear panel to your dryer.

    NOTE: The heating circuit should be troubleshot with the dryer UNPLUGGED. Dangerous voltages are still present with the dryer turned off. Resistance readings are as follows:

    Heating Element (located inside heater box) – remove the two leads from the ceramic terminals on the heating element and take a reading across the terminal points. It should read 9 - 13 ohms.

    Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) (mounted to the heater box.) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

    Hi-Limit Thermostat (mounted to the heater box, closest to the heating element leads) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

    If any of the above readings are abnormal, replace the component. NOTE: If the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat is defective it is highly recommended by most manufacturers to replace BOTH components at the same time. They are often sold as a set. Without doing so, these components can cause potentially fail again.

    Oct 26, 2009 | Whirlpool Dryers

    1 Answer

    It keeps running non-stop but wont heat up


    Your temperature thermostat or heater coil is most likely bad, you can test by ohming each. NOTE: The heating circuit should be troubleshot with the dryer UNPLUGGED. Dangerous voltages are still present with the dryer turned off. Resistance readings are as follows:

    Heating Element (located inside heater box) – remove the two leads from the ceramic terminals on the heating element and take a reading across the terminal points. It should read 9 - 13 ohms.

    Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) (mounted to the heater box.) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

    Hi-Limit Thermostat (mounted to the heater box, closest to the heating element leads) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

    If any of the above readings are abnormal, replace the component. NOTE: If the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat is defective it is highly recommended by most manufacturers to replace BOTH components at the same time. They are often sold as a set. Without doing so, these components can cause potentially fail again.

    Oct 26, 2009 | Whirlpool LEB6300 Electric Dryer

    1 Answer

    Procedure to replace heating element on 84152 electric dryer


    This is a simple repair. Just follow these steps:

    1. UNPLUG dryer. Dangerous voltage is still present even with the dryer turned off.

    2. Remove the dryer vent exhaust hose and remove the back of the dryer.

    3. The heating circuits are located on the right hand side (as viewed from the rear). The heating element is located inside the heater box. Simply remove the mounting screws on the heater box and remove the two wires on the heating element terminals. NOTE: You can leave the two remaining components (Thermal Cut-Out and Hi limit Thermostat) connected on some models. If you need to remove them in order to remove the heating element make sure you label the wires.

    4. Locate the mounting screw(s) on the outside of the heater box that hold the heating element in place.

    5. With the mounting screw(s) removed the heating element will slide out of the heater box.

    6. Insert new heating element, making sure you avoid touching the coil and align the screw holes so you can reinsert the mounting screws.

    7. Re-install the heater box and any remaining components.

    Now...are you sure you have a bad heating element? Just because a dryer does not heat, does not necessarily mean the heating element is bad. The following link explains:

    http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

    The most common fail item that causes a dryer heating circuit failure is a blown TCO caused by poor dryer ventilation. Just something you may consider.

    If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

    Aug 22, 2009 | Kenmore 84152 Electric Dryer

    1 Answer

    Kenmore Elite He4 Dryer Model Number 110.85872400 won't heat up and dry clothes; husband thinks it is the heating element but is having a hard time gett it out


    Before assuming you have a bad heating element, read through the following link:

    http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

    Most dryer heat related problems are attributed to poor ventilation which, in turn, causes the dryer to overheat to the point of failure. More commonly the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) fails. The component acts as a fuse and must be replaced if bad. In addition, if the TCO is determined to be defective, it is recommended that you replace the Hi-Limit Thermostat at the same time. Both these components work in conjunction with the heating element and are mounted on the heater box. The TCO is located on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat is located adjacent to the heating element leads. These two components are often sold as a kit. If you fail to replace both of them you can experience premature failure of the component you do replace.

    Pay particular attention to the section that discusses proper dryer ventilation. If you haven't checked or cleaned the exhaust ducting any time recently, now might be a good time to do so . A dryer left in a clogged or poorly ventilated condition will cause repeated failures in the heating circuit. Not to mention this creates a fire hazard.

    If you read through the link and determine that you have a bad heating element, follow these steps to remove:

    1. Unplug the dryer and remove the lower panel under the door.
    2. Remove the lint screen from the dryer door.
    3. Remove the blower fan housing vent cover.
    4. Disconnect and label the component wiring on the heater box.
    5. Loosen the mounting screw on the heater box front support.
    6. The entire heater box, with element inside, should slide out of the dryer.
    7. There should be a couple of mounting screws on the component side of the heater box that you need to remove and the entire element slides out.

    If you still have questions, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

    Jun 12, 2009 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

    1 Answer

    Dryer runs too hot.


    Remove power from the unit. You want to use a multi-meter set on an ohms scale. Remove the wires from each terminal at the heating element. Check resistance to ground at the heater by putting one meter lead to the case of the heater, and the other meter lead to each terminal at the heater. It sounds as though your element has gone bad and is shorted to the case. The resistance should be infinite. If you read any resistance from the element to the case, replace the heating element. The no heat setting should be exactly that....no heat.

    May 22, 2009 | Dryers

    1 Answer

    Kenmore Dryer


    If you go to searspartsdirect.com, type in your model number in the Search menu, then look under the "Bulkhead" menu option, you will see an illustration of your dryer. You will need to remove the heater box cover (item #5) to get to the heating element. The element should slide out of the bottom of the heater box housing. Removing the housing from the dryer first makes it easier. Sometimes you may need a little muscle in getting the heater coil to come out.

    Have you checked the thermal cut-out(TCO)/hi limit thermostat? This is item #1 in the drawing. If your dryer runs, but does not heat, this is normally the culprit. You are right to assume you could have a heating element problem, but the element tends to be more resilient. In my experience with electric dryers, the thermal cut-out tends to go bad first. It's easier to check and easier to replace as it is mounted on the outside of the heater box. Check for the following:

    With the heater box STILL installed, the TCO will be a small component mounted at the top of the heater box housing. The hi-limit thermostat will be mounted at the bottom of the heater box housing next to the ceramic terminal of the heating element. With the dryer UNPLUGGED, disconnect the wires to the TCO and do a resistance reading. It should read 0 ohms if good. Do the same with the hi-limit thermostat. It should also read 0 ohms if good. Last of all perform a reading across the leads of the heating element with the wires unplugged. You should get a reading of 9 - 13 ohms if it is good. If you determine the TCO or hi-limit thermostat to be bad, it is HIGHLY recommended that you replace them BOTH at the same time. They are sold as a set (part #279769). Failure to replace both components could result in part failure. The part number for the heating element is 4391960. I hope this helps you.

    Mar 17, 2008 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

    1 Answer

    Blowing cold air


    There is not a reset button on an electric dryer that I know of. If a dryer is blowing air at all, that tells me that the blower assembly and drum motor are working. If you have not heat it is generally caused one of the following:

    1. Bad thermal cut-out - located near the heating element housing. Should read a SHORT (0 ohms on an ohm meter) if good. If bad, it is generally a good idea to replace the TCO along with the Hi-Limit Thermostat (mounted right next the TCO in most cases) because the TCO is designed to protect the thermostat and heating element. If the TCO fails, it is likely that the thermostat could also be damaged.

    2. Hi-Limit Thermostat failure - located near the heating element housing. The thermostat opens when the internal heat reaches about 157 degrees (on most dryers). This helps regulate the dryer temperature and helps protect the heating element. If it reads a constant OPEN (infinity reading on an ohm meter), replace it along with the TCO (as mentioned above).

    3. Bad Heating Element - located under the drum on some dryer models and in the rear on others. The element should read about 9-11 ohms if good. If they go bad, the element will generally burns itself OPEN.

    I will need you model number (located near the dryer door opening) in order to give you better advice on how to access the inside of the dryer. Post back with comments and let me know. I hope you find this helpful.

    PS I hope I didn't insult your intelligence, but some people are little more saavy than others, so I try to explain things in the simplest of terms.

    Jan 14, 2008 | Dryers

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