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Believe we are missing a couple of lenses. objects are upside down. thru big scope and finder scope. what gives ?? do i need to return it for another one?

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You are not missing any lens. All astronomical telescopes present the image upside down and reversed. This is normal--- no up or down in space!

Posted on Jan 11, 2009

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How to adjust the finder scope


Mount the finder securely on the main scope tube, and make sure each of its adjusting screws is at about mid-travel (BTW a lot of finder scopes have a rubber ring fitted between the finder and its mounting tube. If this is missing a rubber band is a good substitute).

Place a low power EyePiece in the scope (this will be the longest focal length EP you have), and then in daylight, find a distant object like a tower or distinctive treetop. Swing the scope and center this object in the EP (it will be upside down in a standard EP). Then center it in the crosshairs of the finder.

Change to a lower focal length EP (more powerful) and repeat this procedure . Then at night, swing the scope to an obvious target like a planet or a bright star, and repeat the procedure until everything is centered. If you handle and store the scope carefully between observing sessions there will not be much correction needed next time.

Mar 24, 2015 | Vivitar Telescopes

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Cant get an image.Is it right that the view finderimage is upside down


The image of all astronomical telescopes are upside down (SCTs are upside down and reversed). RACI (right angled, correct image) finders do produce a right-side up image. For daytime use a erect image prism eyepiece.
Follow below instructions (except 7 in your case)

  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Feb 28, 2013 | Vivitar Viv-tel-76700 75x/350x Reflector...

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How to set up the lense


First thing to do is align the finder with the telescope. Do this during the day. Point on a feature at least 100 yards outside and center the finder on it. Next, use your lowest power eyepiece (25mm) and focus on the object. If the scope is not on the object, move the scope until the object is centered. Now adjust the finder so it is centered on what you see in the scope.
At night, let the scope cool down before you start using it. The best way to start is to find the moon. Practice on the moon until you feel comfortable Do not use the barlow until you get good. Always use the 25mm before you use higher power eyepieces, it makes it easier to center the object

Dec 21, 2011 | Telescopes

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No image through lenses


1. During the daylight point the telescope towards an object (water tower, building ) something about 1/2 mile away.
2. Locate the object in your finder.
3. Use the 12.5mm lens (50x) and look through the telescope. Do not use the erect prism
4. Align the finder to what you see in the scope.
5. You can use the 4mm to fine adjust the finder.
6. On a good, clear night.Leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium ( about a hour) Point the finder towards the moon
7. Use the 12.5mm and then focus on the moon.

Note: This is NOT a quality scope. Avoid any scope with .965 eyepieces and silly magnifications! Max power on this scope on a PERFECT night is 200x and Huygens (H12.5) eyepieces give very narrow and poor viewing. Do not use the 3x barlow or the erecting prism. the erecting prism is for terrestrial viewing only and the barlow, although it increases the eyepiece by 3x, will also narrow the view.
Good Luck!

Dec 05, 2011 | Rokinon 62550 Telescope

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We are trying to test out viewing land based objects using the 30X eyepiece, which according to the instructions, should appear right side up and not upside down! This is not happening.


It's NOT really a problem. ALL reflector style telescopes show upside down images. This will not affect your star gazing since there is no UP OR DOWN in outer space. Read my tips on my profile page.

You can buy an "erecting diagonal" for terrestrial viewing- BUT this is not what an astronomical telescope is actually used for.

So align the small finder scope on a distant object like the top of a telescope pole during the day time. Point the main tube at the pole and get the tip top in the main tube's eyepiece. Without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs on the finder scope on the exact same spot. The moon should be your first target at night and you can check and refine the finder scope on the moon.

Mar 12, 2011 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope 60% OFF w/...

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We have our telescope set up but cannot see anything out of the lenses. we have tried all different lenses but without success. Currently there is one star we can see with our naked eye. We cannot see it...


If you look at the PICTURE in your qusetion FIXYA has the scope POINTED at the ground! :)

You have a reflector style telescope. The mirror is the bottom of the scope, and the focuser is on the UP end of the tube pointed UP. Many beginners mount these scopes UPSIDE DOWN with the focuser on the bottom instead of the top (side) of the tube.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one. Take the scope outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. You must also line-up the small finder scope on top with the main tube.

POINT the scope at the top of a distant telephone pole. Without moving the main tube, adjust the cross-hairs on the finder scope so they point at the same spot as the main tube.

Read my TIPS on my profile page.

Feb 26, 2011 | Tasco Luminova 40114675 (675 x 114mm)...

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I have a new Brookstone compact telescope. The image in the smaller viewfinder is upside down making it difficult to line up with image in main telescope. Is this normal? And if so, any suggestions for...


Astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Telescope manuals recommend that you align the finder scope in daylight, by pointing the main scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

Jan 22, 2011 | Telescopes

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I need a manual for the deep space hunter 6 inch purchased around 2002. model number DSH-6


Why would you need a manual for a simple Dobsonian reflector telescope.

The Company does not exist-- anymore.

A manual only showed how to assemble the telescope, it DOES NOT tell you how to USE the telescope to find objects in the sky.

This is a good beginner telescope by the way. Here is how to get started using it:

1. During the day time align the small finder scope and the big scope on the same distant target. Then you can use the finder scope to locate and POINT the main tube to objects in the night sky.

Also during the day put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. This is your LOWEST magnification. Practice focusing on a distant object. The image will be upside down--- this is perfectly normal. Nothing is wrong with the scope.

The moon should be the first target at night.

Buy two books: Turn Left at Orion and Nightwatch.

Download the free monthly star charts at:
http://skymaps.com/downloads.html

You can watch there videos to learn about Astronomy for beginners--

http://vimeo.com/channels/tas

Aug 26, 2010 | Hardin Optical Deep Space Hunter 6 (240 x...

1 Answer

When i look in the finderscope the objects r upside down but when i look in the big one theres nothing,even when i try and zoom in and out thers nothing moving


Some finders show things upside down. There is no up or down in outer space.

During the daytime focus on an object like the top of a telephone pole a good distance away.

Without moving the telescope adjust the finder scope so that the "crosshairs" in the finder are centered on the same object as the main tube. Most astronomical telescopes show upside down and reversed images.

Nov 04, 2009 | Meade (r) TeleStar Manual 60mm Refractor...

1 Answer

Things are upside down looking thru the eyepiece on main telescop


If things are upside down in your telescope, you probably have a reflector telescope.it has curved mirror in the sealed end.take off the cover near the finder and point in the general direction of what you want to see.Make adjustments with the stuff on the mount.If you are viewing terrestrial objects, you will need an inverting lens to correct the image.It is called a Barlow lens and is much longer than the other lenses that come with the telescope.Good Luck

Mar 25, 2009 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

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